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Profit & Loss Variance Report Example for a Retail Company

What is a Profit & Loss Variance Report ?

Profit & Loss (P&L) reports are considered perhaps the most popular monthly financial statement format and are used by executives and financial managers to review monthly results as well as variances against budget and prior year. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it is a dynamic, web-based report where users pick the month and entity to run the report for. The format below shows traffic lights to highlight significant variances. The rows expand dynamically based on filters that determine which accounts to include. Users can drill down on any number to explore the underlying transaction detail to quickly answer their questions.. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Monthly P&L Variance Reports

Retailer companies use Monthly P&L Variance Reports to provide professional, self-service financial results to their managers. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its focus on variances and profit analysis capabilities as well as reduce the chances that managers do not properly analyze reports because of old, hard-to-read legacy formats.

Monthly P&L Variance Report Example

Here is an example of a Monthly Profit & Loss Report with budget and prior year variances.

Retail – P&L Variance Report

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Corporate executives, controllers, store managers, regional managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Monthly P&L Variance Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Monthly P&L Variance Reports, along with general sales forecasts and budgets, balance sheets, cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data for competitors typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Direct Labor Safety Record Dashboard for a Manufacturing Company

What is a Direct Labor Safety Record Dashboard?

Safety record dashboards are considered operational analysis reports and are used by safety and plant managers to monitor manufacturing safety metrics. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it shows monthly trends for three KPIs: 1) Incidents reported, 2) Near incidents reported, and 3) Incidence avoidance quiz score. At the bottom of the dashboard (not visible in the screenshot below) is a report with the figures used in the charts. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Direct Labor Safety KPIs Dashboard

Manufacturers use Direct Labor Safety KPIs Dashboard to analyze safety and accident metrics that can improve the well-being of plant workers. When used as part of good business practices in a HR and Safety departments department, a company can improve its workers’ well-being with related positive impact on culture and performance as well as reduce the chances that executives don’t have good visibility to accidents and associated safety concerns that can detract from performance focus and competitiveness.

Direct Labor Safety KPIs Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Direct Labor Safety Records Dashboard with monthly trends in KPIs related to incident tracking.

Example of a Direct Labor Safety Record Dashboard for a Manufacturing Company

Example of a Direct Labor Safety Record Dashboard for a Manufacturing Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Plant managers, HR managers, safety managers and executives.

Other Dashboards Often Used in Conjunction with Direct Labor Safety KPIs Dashboard

Progressive HR and Safety departments sometimes use several different Direct Labor Safety KPIs Dashboard, along with general detailed incident reports, safety dashboards, workforce dashboards, workforce planning models, safety investment budgets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data for competitors typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Direct Labor Turnover Dashboard for a Manufacturing Company

What is a Direct Labor Turnover Dashboard ?

Employee turnover reports are considered workforce analysis tools and are used by human resource (HR) and plant managers to monitor key metrics for their direct labor teams. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard report is that it provides graphical workforce analysis of monthly trends as well as KPI benchmarking across plants. The three charts on the top shows: 1) Employee headcount trend, 2) Employee separations trend, 3) Employee turnover rate trend. The three charts on the bottom displays: 1) Employee headcount by plant, 2) Employee separations by plant, 3) Employee turnover rate by plant. At the bottom of the repoirt (not visible in the example) you find a report with the figures used in the charts. You find an example of this type of dashboard report below.

Purpose of Direct Labor Turnover Dashboards

Manufacturers use Direct Labor Turnover Dashboards to easily monitor turnover metrics for their direct labor workforce. When used as part of good business practices in a HR department department, a company can improve its margins and efficiency as well as reduce the chances that executives don’t have good visibility to employee retention which can lead to higher costs and ultimately lower profitability.

Direct Labor Turnover Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Direct Labor Turnover Dashboard with trend and plant comparison KPIs.

Example of a Direct Labor Turnover Dashboard for a Manufacturing Company

Example of a Direct Labor Turnover Dashboard for a Manufacturing Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard report?

The typical users of this type of dashboard report are: Plant managers, HR managers and executives.

Other Dashboard reports Often Used in Conjunction with Direct Labor Turnover Dashboards

Progressive HR department departments sometimes use several different Direct Labor Turnover Dashboards, along with general detailed HR transaction reports, workforce dashboards, workforce planning models, salary budgets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data for competitors typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Direct Labor Productivity Dashboard for a Manufacturing Company

What is a Direct Labor Productivity Dashboard?

Labor productivity dashboards are considered efficiency analysis tools and are used by production- and plant managers to analyze monthly trends in labor productivity as well as for benchmarking between plants. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard report is that it can be executed for any month and will dynamically display periods and plants across the two charts. The bottom of the report (not visible in the example below) shows a table with the figures for the charts. The top chart shows the monthly trend in labor productivity and the bottom chart compares productivity across all plants. You find an example of this type of dashboard report below.

Purpose of Labor Productivity Dashboards

Manufacturers use Labor Productivity Dashboards to help managers track productivity numbers in order to quickly react if there are any discrepancies. When used as part of good business practices in a Production department, a company can improve its manufacturing output and margins as well as reduce the chances that executives don’t have good visibility to the efficiency issues are discovered later than necessary.

Labor Productivity Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Labor Productivity Dashboard to monthly trend and comparison between plants.

This example shows a Direct Labor Productivity Dashboard, which helps managers improve decisions related to trends in efficiency and related comparisons across plants. 100s of additional templates are available through the link below.

This example shows a Direct Labor Productivity Dashboard, which helps managers improve decisions related to trends in efficiency and related comparisons across plants. 100s of additional templates are available through the link below.

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard report?

The typical users of this type of dashboard report are: Production  managers, plant managers.

Other Dashboard reports Often Used in Conjunction with Labor Productivity Dashboards

Progressive Production departments sometimes use several different Labor Productivity Dashboards, along with general headcount and payroll reports, detailed efficiency and productivity reports, manufacturing process dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data for competitors typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a New and Existing Customer Sales Dashboard for a Manufacturing Company

What is a New and Existing Customer Sales Dashboard?

Customer sales dashboards are considered important revenue analysis tools and are used by sales managers and executives to analyze revenue streams from the biggest new and existing customers. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard report is that it can be run for any period and it will rank customers from high to low based on the revenues they bring in. The top chart shows sales to the top 10 new customers. The second chart shows sales to the top 20 existing customers. At the bottom of the report (not visible in the example below) there is a section with the figures used in the charts. You find an example of this type of dashboard report below.

Purpose of New and Existing Customer Sales Dashboards

Manufacturers use New and Existing Customer Sales Dashboards to give managers a quick snapshot of which type of customers contribute the most to the company’s revenues. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Sales department, a company can improve its sales and marketing strategies as well as reduce the chances that executives don’t have good visibility to the revenue break-down for new and existing customers.

New and Existing Customer Sales Dashboards Example

Here is an example of a Sales Dashboard showing revenue contribution from the company’s top new and existing customers.

Example of a New and Existing Customer Sales Dashboard for a Manufacturing Company

Example of a New and Existing Customer Sales Dashboard for a Manufacturing Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard report?

The typical users of this type of dashboard report are: Sales executives, marketing managers.

Other Dashboard reports Often Used in Conjunction with New and Existing Customer Sales Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Sales departments sometimes use several different New and Existing Customer Sales Dashboards, along with general sales dashboards, detailed sales reports, product dashboards, sales forecasts, sales kpi reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data for competitors typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Equipment Maintenance Report Example for a Manufacturing Plant

What is a Equipment Maintenance Report ?

Equipment maintenance reports are considered operational analysis tools and are used by operations managers to review monthly hours spent maintaining equipment and to compare to the prior year. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it it lists months across the columns and equipment down the rows. For each equipment is displays the maintenance interval (hours), days remaining until service, maintenance type, and current and prior year maintenance hours. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Equipment Maintenance Reports

Manufacturers use Equipment Maintenance Reports to easily analyze effort (hours) to keep equipment in a plant running and see if there are any anomalies. When used as part of good business practices in a Production department, a company can improve its efficiency as well as reduce the chances that executives don’t have good visibility to whether production lines have unexpected downtime due to service issues.

Equipment Maintenance Report Example

Here is an example of an Equipment Maintenance Report showing monthly service hours and maintenance intervals for the equipment in a manufacturing plant.

Equipment Maintenance Report Example for a Manufacturing Plant

Equipment Maintenance Report Example for a Manufacturing Plant

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Production managers, service personnel.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Equipment Maintenance Reports

Progressive Production departments sometimes use several different Equipment Maintenance Reports, along with Detailed service reports, service and operating expense budgets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data for competitors typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Capacity Utilization Dashboard Example with Manufacturing Plant Comparisons

What is a Capacity Utilization Dashboard?

Utilization analysis dashboards with comparative analysis are considered benchmarking tools and are used by operations managers to track utilization by plant and to easily see exceptions. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard report is that it it provides utilization analysis by individual plant and it also benchmarks these metrics across all the plants. You find an example of this type of dashboard report below.

Purpose of Capacity Utilization Dashboards

Manufacturers use Capacity Utilization Dashboards to monitor plant performance for utilization metrics. When used as part of good business practices in a Production department, an organization can improve its utilization tracking and analysis as well as reduce the chances that executives don’t have good visibility to whether any individual plant becomes inefficient without quickly detecting it.

Capacity Utilization Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Capacity Utilization Dashboard to track multiple manufacturing plants.

Capacity Utilization Dashboard Example with Manufacturing Plant Comparisons

Capacity Utilization Dashboard Example with Manufacturing Plant Comparisons

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard report?

The typical users of this type of dashboard report are: Executives and Plant Managers.

Other Dashboard reports Often Used in Conjunction with Capacity Utilization Dashboards

Progressive Production departments sometimes use several different Capacity Utilization Dashboards, along with production dashboards, inventory reports, sales forecast, sales reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data for competitors typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Yield Variance Report for a Manufacturing Company

What is a Yield Variance Report?

Yield reports are considered production analysis tools and are used by production- and plant managers to analyze actual versus standard yield and compare the variances across manufacturing plants. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it is parameter driven so the user can run it for any period and any number of plants. One report per plant is automatically generated and displayed in the tabs at the bottom. Within a single report (which is for one plant), the products are shown down the rows and the columns display: Actual yield, Standard yield, Yield variance, Cost, and Yield loss. The last row at the bottom displays totals. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Yield Variance Reports

Manufacturers use Yield Variance Reports to help managers get a clear picture of production efficiency across their plants. When used as part of good business practices in a Production department, an organization can improve its production expense planning and capital investment strategies as well as reduce the chances that executives don’t have a good visibility to whether any individual plant underperforms as it relates to its yields.

Yield Variance Report Example

Here is an example of a Yield Variance Report with separate tabs (see bottom) per plant.

Yield Variance Report for a Manufacturing Company

Yield Variance Report for a Manufacturing Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Production managers and product managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Yield Variance Reports

Progressive Production departments sometimes use several different Yield Variance Reports, along with production dashboards, inventory reports, costing reports, benchmark dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data for competitors typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Utilities Cost Dashboard Example for a Manufacturing Plant

What is a Utilities Cost Dashboard?

Utilities cost dashboards are considered operational analysis tools and are used by accountants and plant managers to analyze utility expenses by department and by month. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard report is that it benchmarks costs across departments and compares to budgets. The report has eight charts as well as a section at the bottom with figures. The top four charts provides monthly trends for Electricity cost, Natural gas cost, Sewage cost, and Water cost. The four bottom charts shows the same KPIs but benchmarks them across departments. You find an example of this type of dashboard report below.

Purpose of Utilities Cost Dashboards

Manufacturers use Utilities Cost Dashboards to quickly understand major utilities expenses in order to produce accurate budgets and to analyze profit margins. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, an organization can improve its expense planning and margins as well as reduce the chances that executives don’t have a good understanding of utility expenses.

Utilities Cost Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Utilities Cost Dashboard with analysis of expenses related to electricity, natural gas, sewage and water.

Utilities Cost Dashboard Example for a Manufacturing Plant

Utilities Cost Dashboard Example for a Manufacturing Plant

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard Report?

The typical users of this type of dashboard report are: COOs, budget managers, accountants, plant managers.

Other Dashboards and Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Utilities Cost Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Utilities Cost Dashboards, along with profit & loss reports, expense budgets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data for competitors typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Materials Usage Variance Report for a Manufacturing Company

What is a Materials Usage Variance Report for a Manufacturing Company?

Materials usage reports are considered production analysis reports and are used by production- and plant managers to review actual versus standard costs and quantities for core products that their plants produce. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it displays a summary with comparison charts for all plants on the top of the report and then it shows details by individual plant and core products below. The columns shows Standard Cost, Actual Cost and Variance. Following that you see Standard Quantity, Actual Quantity and Variance You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Materials Variance Reports

Manufacturers use Materials Variance Reports to improve product decisions by easily analyzing and comparing actual and standard materials costs and quantities across products as well as plants. When used as part of good business practices in a Production department, an organization can improve its production efficiency and data collection as well as reduce the chances that a lack of benchmarking and analysis leads to competitive disadvantages.

Materials Variance Report Example

Here is an example of a Materials Variance Report with costing and quantity comparisons by product and plant.

Example of a Materials Usage Variance Report for a Manufacturing Company

Example of a Materials Usage Variance Report for a Manufacturing Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Production  managers, product managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Materials Variance Reports

Progressive Production departments sometimes use several different Materials Variance Reports, along with production dashboards, inventory reports, costing reports, benchmark dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data for competitors typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples