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Example of a Revenue Dashboard for Healthcare Providers

What is a Revenue Dashboard?

Revenue Dashboards for healthcare providers are considered performance analysis tools and are used by Executives and CFOs to monitor revenues metrics. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it gives users a very easy and clean interface to review: 1) Revenue by patient type, 2) Revenue by facility, and 3) Monthly revenue trend with actual and budget comparison. The filters enable users to slice the visuals into more granular data. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Revenue Dashboards for Healthcare Providers

Healthcare organizations use Revenue Dashboards to analyze trends and comparisons of income by patient type and from different facilities. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, an organization can improve its revenue generating strategies, and it can reduce the chances that important trends are missed with resulting impact on margins and surplus/deficit.

Example of a Revenue Dashboard for a Healthcare Provider

Here is an example of a Revenue Dashboard for healthcare providers with trends and budget comparison.

Example of a Revenue Dashboard for Healthcare Providers

Example of a Revenue Dashboard for Healthcare Providers

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, CFOs, analysts.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Revenue Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Revenue Dashboards, along with profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements, annual budgets and forecasts, billing dashboards, detailed revenue reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a CFO Dashboard for Healthcare Providers

What is a CFO Dashboard for Healthcare Providers?

CFO Dashboards are considered financial analysis tools and are used by CFOs and analysts to monitor key financial metrics. Some of the main functionality in this dashboard is that it provides analysis from eight different perspectives, including: 1) Actual and budgeted revenues by GL account, 2) Top 5 expenses – actual and budget, 3) Revenue by facility – actual and budget, 4) Accounts receivable (AR) – monthly trend, 5) Revenues – monthly trend with actual and budget comparison, 6) Expenses – monthly trend with actual and budget comparison, 7) Actual and budgeted expenses by facility, and 8) Bad debt – monthly trend. The user can filter on month and year on the top of the dashboard. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Healthcare CFO Dashboards

Healthcare organizations use Healthcare CFO Dashboards to track financial trends and budget variances. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, an organization can improve its decision-making speed, and it can reduce the chances that key financial issues goes undetected longer then necessary.

Example of a Healthcare CFO Dashboard

Here is an example of a CFO Dashboard for healthcare providers with financial trends and budget comparisons.

Example of a CFO Dashboard for Healthcare Providers

Example of a CFO Dashboard for Healthcare Providers

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, CFOs, analysts, controllers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Healthcare CFO Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Healthcare CFO Dashboards, along with profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements, annual budgets and forecasts, AR aging reports, bad debt reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a CEO Dashboard for Healthcare Providers

What is a CEO Dashboard for Healthcare Providers?

CEO Dashboards are considered executive business monitoring tools and are used by CEOs and other leaders to keep an eye on top level key performance indicators (KPIs). Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides analysis from eight different perspectives, including: 1) Actual and budgeted revenues by GL account, 2) Monthly trend in number of claims versus claims paid, 3) Patient population by type, 4) Patient satisfaction by facility (clinic or hospital), 5) Monthly revenue trend with actual and budget comparison, 6) Monthly expense trend with actual and budget comparison, 7) Average length of stay (ALOS) – monthly trend, and 8) Monthly supplier quality trend. The user can filter on month and year on the top of the dashboard. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Healthcare CEO Dashboards

Healthcare providers use CEO Dashboards to give executives an easy and interactive way to analyze the organization’s performance. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and executive departments, an organization can improve its strategic decisions, and it can reduce the chances that leaders lack important and real-time insights.

Example of a Healthcare CEO Dashboard

Here is an example of a CEO Dashboard for healthcare providers with KPI trends and variance analysis.

Example of a CEO Dashboard for Healthcare Providers

Example of a CEO Dashboard for Healthcare Providers

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, CEOs, CFOs, analysts, board members.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Healthcare CEO Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and executive departments sometimes use several different Healthcare CEO Dashboards, along with profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements, annual budgets and forecasts, revenue dashboards, scorecards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Yield Variance Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies

What is a Yield Loss and Variance Dashboard?

Yield Dashboards are considered operational analysis tools and are used by Cost Accountants and Production Managers to analyze scrap-related metrics from the manufacturing of their products. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides yield loss and variance analysis from four different perspectives. These include: 1)  Monthly trend in yield loss for selected plant and for the company total, 2) Yield variance per product with metrics for produced quantity, input cost actual, input cost budget, actual yield, standard yield, material used, input cost per unit, yield loss amount and yield loss percent, 3) Yield loss with benchmark comparison across selected plants and % of company total, and 4) Yield loss per plant with loss % and loss amount and grand total. The user can select plant(s) and years on the top of the dashboard. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Yield Loss and Yield Variance Dashboards

Manufacturing companies use scrap-related dashboards to give managers an easy to understand and graphical analysis of yield loss metrics. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and manufacturing operations departments, an organization can improve its decisions related to cost and production efficiency, and it can reduce the chances that managers miss any trends or outliers.

Example of a Yield Loss Dashboard

Here is an example of a Yield Loss and Variance Dashboard with cross plant comparison and trend analysis.

Example of a Yield Variance Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies

Example of a Yield Variance Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Analysts, plant managers, production managers, cost accountants, budget managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Yield Loss Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and manufacturing operations departments sometimes use several different Yield Loss Dashboards, along with manufacturing dashboards, profit & loss reports, annual budgets, expense variance reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Utility Cost Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies

What is a Utility Cost Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies?

Utility Cost Dashboards are considered cost analysis tools and are used by controllers and cost accountants to track utility expenses. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it compares expenses over months, years and GL accounts. Analysis includes: 1) Utility cost metrics by GL account by month over the last four years, 2) Utility cost by GL account with benchmarking of the last four years, and 3) Total utility cost per year for the past four years. The user can filter the dashboard on years and GL accounts. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Utility Cost Dashboards

Manufacturing companies use Utility Cost Dashboards to provide managers with an easy way to compare utility expenses over a number of years. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, an organization can improve its expense control and profitability, and it can reduce the chances that managers miss any utility cost  or trends.

Example of a Utility Cost Dashboard

Here is an example of a Utility Cost Dashboard with monthly and annual comparisons across General Ledger accounts.

Example of a Utility Cost Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies

Example of a Utility Cost Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: CFOs, controllers, cost accountants, plant managers, budget managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Utility Cost Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Utility Cost Dashboards, along with profit & loss reports, cash flow reports, corporate financial dashboards, annual budgets, expense variance reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of an Open Orders Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies

What is an Open Orders Dashboard?

Open order-related dashboards are considered operational planning and analysis tools and are used by Analysts and Production Managers to monitor their ability to fulfill sales orders in a timely manner. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it enables managers to slice and dice orders and related production metrics from five different perspectives, including: 1) Monthly trend in Plant order value and total order value, 2) Each plants’ percent of total company orders, 3) Monthly open orders by month with metrics for order value, order product costs, sold quantity, available quantity, available quantity forecast, Net stock quantity (backlog), and production quality, metrics for order value by plant with order value and percent of total for all plants, and 5) Order quantity by product with metrics for: Total order quantity for all plants, order quantity by plant, index for plant versus company total. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Open Order Dashboards

Manufacturing companies use Open Order Dashboards to monitor their sales orders and ability to deliver product quantities to fulfill these orders on time and with expected quality. This includes benchmarking across plants. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and operations departments, an organization can improve and speed up its production planning, revenue optimization and related strategies, and it can reduce the chances that sales and profits suffer because of lack of management insights.

Example of an Open Order Dashboard

Here is an example of an Open Orders Dashboard for a manufacturing company with analysis of metrics like sales, forecast and backlog.

Example of an Open Orders Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies

Example of an Open Orders Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, sales managers, analysts, plant managers, production managers,.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Open Order Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and operations departments sometimes use several different Open Order Dashboards, along with profit & loss reports, cash flow reports, corporate financial dashboards, sales forecast, annual budgets, detailed sales order reports, inventory reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Safety Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies

What is a Safety Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies?

Safety-focused Dashboards are considered incident analysis tools and are used by Executives and Safety Managers to monitor safety-related metrics and trends. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides KPIs and graphical trend analysis that can be viewed for different years and plants. The dashboard includes: 1) Monthly incident trend per employee per plant compared to the company (all plants) average, 2) Total number of monthly incidents and near incidents, 3) Incident avoidance quiz score versus company-wide score, 4) Metrics by plant with average number of employees, safety incidents reported, near incidents reported and incidents per employee (FTE), and 5) Metrics by month with headcount, safety incidents reported, near incidents reported, incidents per employee and incident avoidance quiz score. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Safety Dashboards

Manufacturing companies use Safety Dashboards to analyze and improve safety at their plants. This includes benchmarking across plants. When used as part of good business practices in HR and operations departments, an organization can improve and speed up its safety records and workplace reputation, and it can reduce the chances that plant operations are disrupted due to safety-related issues.

Example of a Safety Dashboard

Here is an example of A Safety Dashboard for a manufacturing company.

Example of a Safety Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies

Example of a Safety Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, analysts, plant managers, production managers, safety officers, HR managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Safety Dashboards

Progressive HR and operations departments sometimes use several different Safety Dashboards, along with incident reports, safety reports, HR reports, budget models with safety targets, human capital planning models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Labor Productivity Dashboard for a Manufacturing Company

What is a Labor Productivity Dashboard?

Labor productivity dashboards are considered efficiency analysis tools and are used by Plant- and Production Managers to analyze headcount and related costs and productivity. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it gives the user four angles of analysis, including: 1) Plant headcount and total headcount – monthly trend, 2) Average direct labor cost per employee (for the selected plant) for all plants – monthly trend, 3) Monthly metrics for headcount, total direct costs, average cost per FTE, productivity, separations, turnover rates, and 4) Direct labor productivity versus company average – monthly trend. The user can select year and plant from the top of the dashboard. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Labor Productivity Dashboards

Manufacturing companies use Labor Productivity Dashboards to monitor trends in headcount, labor costs and productivity. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A), HR and operations departments, an organization can improve its revenues and margins, and it can reduce the chances that managers miss important efficiency trends or outliers.

Example of a Labor Productivity Dashboard

Here is an example of a Labor Productivity Dashboard with trends in headcount, costs and productivity.

Example of a Labor Productivity Dashboard for a Manufacturing Company

Example of a Labor Productivity Dashboard for a Manufacturing Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, analysts, plant managers, production managers, HR managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Labor Productivity Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A), HR and operations departments sometimes use several different Labor Productivity Dashboards, along with efficiency reports, profitability dashboards, human capital planning, HR reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Plant Capacity Utilization Dashboard for a Manufacturing Company

What is a Plant Capacity Utilization Dashboard?

Capacity Utilization Dashboards are considered operational analysis tools and are used by Plant- and Production Managers to monitor capacity and utilization metrics. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides analysis from three different angles, including: 1) Capacity utilization – current and prior year monthly metrics by plant with tons (weight), output and utilization %, 2) Chart that compares current and prior year utilization across selected plants, and 3) Capacity utilization trend for current and prior year. The user can select and unselect plants and years on the top of the screen. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Plant Capacity Utilization Dashboards

Manufacturing companies use Plant Capacity Utilization Dashboards to enable production and plant managers to benchmark utilization metrics across their plants as well as analyze trends. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and operations departments, an organization can improve its efficiency and process improvement focus, and it can reduce the chances that low performers or outlier metrics are missed for longer than necessary.

Example of a Plant Capacity Utilization Dashboard

Here is an example of a Capacity Utilization Dashboard with plant benchmarking and trend analysis.

Example of a Plant Capacity Utilization Dashboard for a Manufacturing Company

Example of a Plant Capacity Utilization Dashboard for a Manufacturing Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, analysts, plant managers, production managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Plant Capacity Utilization Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and operations departments sometimes use several different Plant Capacity Utilization Dashboards, along with efficiency reports, sales forecasts, production planning, backlog reports, open orders reports, profitability dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of an Inventory Analysis Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies

What is an Inventory Analysis Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies?

Inventory Dashboards are considered operational analysis tools and are used by COO’s, production managers, and inventory managers to monitor monthly inventory changes. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it offer analysis from four different perspectives, including: 1) Change in inventory value per month, year and item category, 2) Annual change in inventory value compared to prior year, 3) Monthly trend in inventory value versus last year, and 4) Monthly figures for available quantity, sold quantity, net stock quantity (backlog) and percent. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Inventory Analysis Dashboards

Manufacturing companies use Inventory Analysis Dashboards to give managers an important big picture view of changes in inventory and monthly trends. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and operations departments, an organization can improve its strategies as it relates to production volumes, inventory, sales and pricing, and it can reduce the chances that the business runs into regular inventory-related problems.

Example of a Inventory Analysis Dashboard

Here is an example of a Inventory Analysis Dashboard with trends, quantity and value metrics. You can also try the interactive version of this dashboard example here (use the <> buttons on the bottom of the dashboard to navigate to page 4 to see the Inventory example).

Example of an Inventory Analysis Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies

Example of an Inventory Analysis Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: COOs, inventory managers, sales managers, purchasing managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Inventory Analysis Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and operations departments sometimes use several different Inventory Analysis Dashboards, along with inventory reports, sales forecasts, production plans, sales dashboards, backlog reports, open order reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples