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Example of a Revenue Estimate Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

What is a Revenue Estimate Dashboard for Professional Services Companies?

Revenue Estimate Dashboards are considered planning tools and are used by project leaders and executives to analyze expected revenues from clients and projects. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it is a monthly report that dynamically displays service metrics from three different perspectives: 1) Revenue estimate ranked by client, 2) Project pipeline by client with high and low estimates, and 3) Monthly trend for project pipeline with high/low estimates. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Service Revenue Estimate Dashboards

Professional Services organizations use Revenue Estimate Dashboards to easily forecast expected billing revenues in the pipeline. When used as part of good business practices in FP&A and Project departments, a company can improve its tactical decisions and increase revenues, and it can reduce the chances that project/client outliers or trends are left untouched due to lack of visibility to performance metrics.

Example of a Service Revenue Estimate Dashboard

Here is an example of a Revenue Estimate Dashboard with client ranking and pipeline trends.

Example of a Revenue Estimate Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

Example of a Revenue Estimate Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, Service Leaders, CFOs, Project Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Service Revenue Estimate Dashboards

Progressive FP&A and Project departments sometimes use several different Service Revenue Estimate Dashboards, along with detailed project reports, project dashboards, project budgets, project forecast models, utilization reports, financial statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of an Executive Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

What is an Executive Dashboard for Professional Services Companies?

Executive Dashboards are considered monitoring tools and are used by senior leaders as a self-service, real-time solution to review revenue and expense trends as well as key project metrics. Some of the main functionality in this type of visual report is that it is parameter driven so the user can run it for any year and month to see the result graphically. The report shows eight perspectives of the business, including: 1) Actual versus budget revenue by category, 2) Actual and budget monthly revenue trend, 3) Top five expenses with actual to budget comparison, 4) Actual and budget expense trend, 5) Pipeline by project, with high and low estimates, 6) Monthly pipeline trend with high and low estimates, 7) Top ten clients by billing amount, and 8) Bottom ten clients by billing amount. Below the charts there is a table section showing the figures used in the visuals. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Executive Dashboards for Professional Services

Professional Services organizations use Executive Dashboards to give leaders an easy way to analyze the top performance drivers of the company. When used as part of good business practices in Executive departments, a company can improve its strategic decisions and financial performance, and it can reduce the chances that key profitability inhibitors are not addressed in a timely fashion due to lack of insight to the underlying metrics.

Example of a Executive Dashboards for Professional Service

Here is an example of an Executive Dashboard with revenue and expense trends and variances as well as client rankings.

Example of an Executive Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

Example of an Executive Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Visual report?

The typical users of this type of visual report are: CEOs, COOs, CFOs, CROs and other top leaders.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Executive Dashboards for Professional Services

Progressive Executive departments sometimes use several different Executive Dashboards, along with profit & loss reports, KPI dashboards, project dashboards and detailed project reports, project forecast models, annual budget models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Financial Dashboard for Nonprofit Organizations

What is a Financial Dashboard for Nonprofits?

Financial Dashboards are considered analysis and business monitoring tools and are used by executives and financial managers analyze key financial metrics on a single screen and with powerful visualizations. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides analysis through eight different perspectives on the dashboard. They include: 1) Actual versus budget and Last Year variance analysis for revenues, 2) Revenue ratio for each location/division as a percent of total revenues, 3) Revenue ratio based on the Type of revenue, 4) Trend KPIs for revenues, Operating income, Net income, 5) Actual versus budgeted expenses per entity, 6) Top 10 expenses per category, 7) Revenues versus expenses trend 8) Revenues versus operating income trend. The filters on the top right of the dashboard makes it quick for the user to switch period and business unit You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Financial Dashboards for Nonprofit Organizations

Nonprofits use Financial Dashboards to give managers an easy and user-friendly way to analyze financial performance. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Executive department, an organization can improve and speed up its decisions and related strategies, and it can reduce the chances that managers miss important trends and variances.

Financial Dashboards for Nonprofit Organizations – Example

Here is an example of a Financial Dashboard for Nonprofit Organizations to simplify analysis of revenues and expenses.

Example of a Financial Dashboard for Nonprofit Organizations

Example of a Financial Dashboard for Nonprofit Organizations

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Senior executives, financial managers, department heads.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Financial Dashboards for Nonprofit Organizations

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Executive departments sometimes use several different Financial Dashboards, along with profit & loss reports, monthly financial trend reports, KPI dashboards, budgeting and forecasting models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Customer 360 Degree Analysis Report Example

What is a Customer 360 Degree Analysis Report?

Customer 360 degree reports are considered one of the most important analysis tools in a company and are often used by customer-facing employees and managers to quickly get a complete picture of a specific customer without having to manually assemble data from different systems. Some of the key functionality in this type of dashboard report is that it combines data from the company’s systems that hold customer information. These typically include sales and receivables data from the ERP system, pipeline data from CRM and support data from the helpdesk system. The report is a single page, easy to read format that combines customer metrics with charts for easy analysis. The report is parameter driven and the user can run it for any customer and date range. You find an example of this type of dashboard report below.

Purpose of 360 Degree Customer Reports

Companies and organizations use 360 Degree Customer Reports to speed up decisions by providing employees and managers with a very quick and easy way to see everything going on with a customer. When used as part of good business practices in a customer-facing department, a company can improve its customer-related decisions as well as reduce the chances that revenues are lost because employees make decisions without a complete customer picture.

360 Degree Customer Report Example

Here is an example of a Customer360 report that combines data from multiple data sources.

Customer 360 Degree Analysis Report Example

Customer 360 Degree Analysis Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard report?

The typical users of this type of dashboard report are: Support teams, Sales teams, Managers.

Other Dashboard Reports Often Used in Conjunction with 360 Degree Customer Reports

Progressive customer-facing Departments sometimes use several different 360 Degree Customer Reports, along with sales reports, receivables reports, support reports, customer dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from helpdesk, CRM and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Microsoft Dynamics 365 (CRM), Salesforce, Hubspot, Zendesk, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Project Budgeting Template Example

What is a Project Budgeting Template?

Project Budgeting input templates are considered detailed planning tools for project-based businesses and are used by project managers and budgeting executives to plan estimated revenues, expenses and profitability per project. Some key functionality in this type of budget form allows the user to enter any number of projects, associate them with a Project Type, and capture key metrics like hours, rates and start/end dates. Based on the Project Types, revenues and expenses are automatically associated with the applicable GL account number for the corporate budget. The model spreads the budgeted amounts across the active project months. The total revenues and expenses are compared to actual data from the prior year with a displayed variance. You will find an example of this type of budget form below.

Purpose of Project Budgets

Companies and organizations use Project Budgets to analyze profitability and other financial metrics for their projects. When used as part of good business practices in a Project Management Office and Budgeting Department, a company can improve its resource planning and profit margins as well as reduce the risk of capacity problems.

Project Budget Example

Here is an example of a detailed Project Budgeting Form for revenue and expense planning.

Project Budgeting Template Example

Project Budgeting Template Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here.

Who Uses This Type of Budget Form?

The typical users of this type of budget form are: Project Managers and Planning Executives.

Other Budget Forms Often Used in Conjunction with Project Budgets

Progressive Project Management Office and Budgeting Departments sometimes use several different Project Budgets, along with payroll, capital expense and profit & loss budget forms, project reports, project dashboards, and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples