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Example of an Accounts Receivable (AR) Detail Report to Streamline the AR Aging Analysis Process

How can Accounts Receivable Reports Drive Faster and Better Decisions?

As Accounting and Collections Managers increasingly become key innovators in the AR Aging Analysis and Collections Process, they must rely on modern self-service corporate performance management (CPM) and business intelligence (BI) tools. Using interactive Accounts Receivable Reports like the Accounts Receivable (AR) Detail Report template shown below enables them and users from the finance and receivables teams to experience near real time customer AR aging analysis that help drive faster and better decisions.

Who uses Accounts Receivable (AR) Detail Reports and What are Some Key Analytical Features?

In today’s fast-paced business environment, Accounting and Collections Managers are under high pressure to supply end users like collections staff and accountants with timely and concise Accounts Receivable Reports. Companies use key features like the ones below to support their users with effective analysis that helps drive improved cash flow and AR aging visibility:

  • Receivables detail by customer, including invoice numbers, invoice dates, invoice amounts and categorized aging of outstanding invoices
  • The detail list in the lower portion of the report has the option to include only open items, closed items, or all items
  • Graphical view of total AR balances, Top 5 customers by amount due, and oldest overdue invoices

The Accounts Receivable (AR) Detail Report template can be used as a key element of the AR Aging Analysis process:

Example of an Accounts Receivable (AR) Detail Report to Streamline the AR Aging Analysis Process

The Accounts Receivable (AR) Detail Report is a ready-to-use AR Report from the Solver Marketplace.

A Brief Description of the Accounts Receivable (AR) Detail Report Template

Accounts Receivable Reports like the one seen in the image above are interactive and parameter driven and typically contain sections with Accounts Receivable information in both graphical and list format. One of the important features that aid the user in the analysis process is the ability to view detailed accounts receivable transactions by document number summarized by customer and with grand totals. Accounts Receivable (AR) Detail Reports are often used in conjunction with AR summary reports, sales reports, Accounts Receivable and customer analysis dashboards, balance sheets, and profit & loss variance reports.

Data Integration to Transaction Systems

Most organizations these days want automated and streamlined planning, reporting and analysis. However, many of the benefits described earlier rely on best of breed Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools and/or Business Intelligence (BI) capabilities as well as data marts or data warehouses that use pre-built integrations to the organization’s ERP system. Oftentimes, they also need integrations to other key data sources like CRM, subscription systems, payroll tools, etc.

Modern, cloud-based ERPs like Microsoft Dynamics 365 Finance (D365 Finance), Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Sage Intacct, Acumatica, Netsuite and SAP have robust APIs which allow for dynamic integrations to CPM and BI tools that are fully automated and flexible to run on a schedule or on-demand.

Additional Resources to Aid with Research of Templates, CPM and BI Tools

Example of a Consolidated Statement of Income Call Report

What is a Consolidated Statement of Income Call Report?

The Consolidated Statement of Income is considered a Call Report and is used by accountants and compliance managers to submit quarterly data as per Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) requirements. Some of the main functionality in this type of regulatory report is that it can both be used as an input form and as a formatted report ready to submit to OCC. Any data that can be imported from the ERP system or other database will automatically be pulled into the form without having to be re-entered. Only the top portion of the form is visible in the screenshot. You find an example of this type of regulatory report below.

Purpose of Consolidated Statement of Income Call Report Templates

Banks use Call Report Templates to automate the input and and submission process to OCC. Because this type of template is in a cloud-based reporting system, users can log-in and work on the report from anywhere. When used as part of good business practices in Accounting- and Compliance departments, a bank can improve its processes and save labor costs, and it can reduce the chances that data entry mistakes occur.

Example of a Consolidated Statement of Income Call Report Template

Here is an example of a OCC Call Report with quarterly Consolidated Statement of Income data.

Example of a Consolidated Statement of Income Call Report

Example of a Consolidated Statement of Income Call Report

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Regulatory Report?

The typical users of this type of regulatory report are: Accountants, compliance managers, CFOs.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Form 5300 Call Report Templates

Progressive Accounting- and Compliance departments sometimes use OCC call reports supported by internal income statements, balance sheets, cash flow reports, trial balances, transaction detail reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from bank systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Top Ten Customers by Profitability Report for banks

What is a Top Ten Customers by Profitability Report for Banks?

Top Customer by Profitability Reports are considered customer ranking reports and are used by managers and account executives to get a snapshot of the top most profitable customer by branch. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it groups and ranks the top 10 customers by branch location. The columns include: Average account balance, Total revenue, Total expense, and Net profit. The color indicators help the user quickly see important metrics. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Top Customers by Profitability Reports

Banks use Top Customers by Profitability Reports to at any time be able to identify their most important customers at the branch level and overall. When used as part of good business practices in Executive- and Account Management departments, a bank can improve its customer retention strategies, and it can reduce the chances that top customers are not getting the optimal nurturing.

Example of a Top Customers by Profitability Report

Here is an example of a Top Ten Customer Report that ranks each customer based on profitability and groups them by branch.

Example of a Top Ten Customers by Profitability Report for banks

Example of a Top Ten Customers by Profitability Report for banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Account executives, production managers, branch managers, analysts.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Top Customers by Profitability Reports

Progressive Executive- and Account Management departments sometimes use several different Top Customers Reports, along with detailed customer transaction reports, financial statements, annual budgets, KPI dashboards, customer dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from bank systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a New Customer Acquisition Report for Banks

What is a New Customer Acquisition Report for Banks?

New Customer Acquisition Reports are considered growth and profitability analysis tools and are used by sales managers and leaders to monitor new customer growth and profitability metrics. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it shows new customer KPIs for any given month and branch. The rows list new customers and key columns include detail and totals for: Average product balance, Net interest amount, Monthly cost, SFAS cost and Net profit. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of New Customer Acquisition Reports

Banks use New Customer Acquisition Reports to easily analyze the quantity of new customers a branch has acquired and the level of profitability associated with each customer and in total. When used as part of good business practices in Production- and Account Management departments, a bank can improve its revenue growth strategies, and it can reduce the chances that unprofitable tactics are not quickly addressed.

Example of a New Customer Acquisition Report

Here is an example of a New Customer Acquisition Report with a detailed listing of new customers for any given month as well as related KPIs.

Example of a New Customer Acquisition Report for Banks

Example of a New Customer Acquisition Report for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Account executives, production managers, branch managers, analysts.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with New Customer Acquisition Reports

Progressive Production- and Account Management departments sometimes use several different New Customer Acquisition Reports, along with financial statements, annual budgets, sales forecasts, KPI dashboards, customer dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from bank systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Term Deposit Profitability Trend Report for Banks

What is a Term Deposit Profitability Trend Report for Banks?

Term Deposit Profitability Trend Reports are considered operational reports and are used by executives and managers to analyze monthly trends in term deposit metrics. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it dynamically lists the months of the year across the columns and loan metrics down the rows with a Gross Profit total at the bottom. Some of the key rows include: Portfolio average balance, Deposit production, Nbr origination, Average size, FTP Income, Interest Expense, Net Interest Margin, Average First Year NIM, Average Doc Prep Fee, Average Origination Cost, FTP Income, Interest Expense, Net Interest Margin, Servicing Costs, Teller costs, Online costs, Total expenses, and Gross Profit. The green, yellow and red exception colors help highlight months with high/low profitability. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Term Deposit Profitability Trend Reports

Banks use Term Deposit Profitability Trend Reports to give leaders an easily understandable format to analyze monthly trends in term deposit revenues, expenses and profitability. When used as part of good business practices in Production- and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, a bank can improve its net profit and related term deposit strategies, and it can reduce the chances that major exceptions or trends are not quickly discovered.

Example of a Term Deposit Profitability Trend Report

Here is an example of a Term Deposit Profitability Report with monthly trends in term deposit metrics and profitability.

Example of a Term Deposit Profitability Trend Report for Banks

Example of a Term Deposit Profitability Trend Report for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Executives, branch managers, finance leaders, loan managers, production managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Term Deposit Profitability Trend Reports

Progressive Production- and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Term Deposit Profitability Reports, along with detailed term deposit reports, term deposit portfolio dashboards, KPI dashboards, branch benchmarking reports, annual budgets, profit & loss trend reports, balance sheets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from deposit management systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Loan Profitability Trend Report for Banks

What is a Loan Profitability Trend Report for Banks?

Loan Profitability Trend Reports are considered operational reports and are used by executives and loan managers to analyze monthly trends in loan KPIs. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it dynamically lists the months of the year across the columns and loan metrics down the rows with a Gross Profit total at the bottom. Some of the key rows include: Portfolio average balance, Loan production, Nbr origination, Average size, Interest rate, FTP Expense, Net interest margin, Total Revenues, Origination costs, Servicing costs, Teller costs, Online costs, Total expenses, and Gross Profit. The green, yellow and red exception colors help highlight months with high/low profitability. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Loan Profitability Trend Reports

Banks use Loan Profitability Trend Reports to give leaders an easily understandable format to analyze monthly trends in loan revenues, expenses and profitability. When used as part of good business practices in Loan- and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, a bank can improve its net profit and related loan strategies, and it can reduce the chances that major exceptions or trends are not quickly discovered.

Example of a Loan Profitability Trend Report

Here is an example of a Loan Profitability Report with monthly trends in loan metrics and profitability.

Example of a Loan Profitability Trend Report for Banks

Example of a Loan Profitability Trend Report for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Executives, branch managers, finance leaders, loan managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Loan Profitability Trend Reports

Progressive Loan- and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Loan Profitability Reports, along with detailed loan reports, loan portfolio dashboards, KPI dashboards, branch benchmarking reports, annual budgets, profit & loss trend reports, balance sheets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from loan management systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Balance Sheet Report for Bank Branches

What is a Balance Sheet Report for Bank Branches?

Branch-level Balance Sheets are considered essential month-end reports and are used by corporate executives and branch managers to track actual balances and variances for assets, liabilities and equity figures. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it enables the user to run them for any month and any bank branch, including at the consolidated level. The columns compares the current month to the same period last year as well as to the budget, and it calculates the variances and enables drill-down to detail. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Branch-level Balance Sheets

Banks use Branch-level Balance Sheets to enable variance analysis for branch-level balance sheet metrics. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, a bank can improve its fiscal- and strategic decisions, and it can reduce the chances that managers don’t quickly discover major variances and the reasons behind them.

Example of a Branch-level Balance Sheet

Here is an example of a Branch-level Income Statement Report with prior year and budget variances.

Example of a Balance Sheet Report for Bank Branches

Example of a Balance Sheet Report for Bank Branches

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Executives, branch managers, finance leader.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Branch-level Balance Sheets

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Branch-level Balance Sheets, along with income statements, consolidated balance sheets, cash flow statements, trended financial statements, KPI reports, executive dashboards, budget models and forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of an Income Statement Report for bank branches

What is a Income Statement Report for Bank Branches?

Branch-level Income Statements are considered essential month-end reports and are used by corporate executives and branch managers to track revenues, expenses and profitability. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it enables the user to run them for any month and any bank branch, including at the consolidated level. The columns compare the current month to the same period last year as well as to the budget, and it calculates the variances. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Branch-level Income Statements

Banks use Branch-level Income Statements to enable self-service analysis of the monthly performance of each branch, including monitoring of variances from plan and prior year. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, a bank can improve its strategic decisions and profitability, and it can reduce the chances that managers don’t quickly discover major variances and the reasons behind them.

Example of a Branch-level Income Statement

Here is an example of a Branch-level Income Statement Report with prior year and budget variances.

Example of an Income Statement Report for bank branches

Example of an Income Statement Report for bank branches

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Executives, branch managers, finance leader.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Branch-level Income Statements

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Branch-level Income Statements, along with consolidated income statements, balance sheets, cash flow statements, KPI reports, executive dashboards, budget models and forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples