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Workforce Compensation Report with Payroll Analysis Example

What is a Workforce Compensation Report with Payroll Analysis?

HR and Payroll reports are considered workforce compensation analysis tools and are often used by accountants and payroll managers to review employee hours, rates and salary expenses. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it is parameter driven and provides both transaction detail and summary payroll related information. The columns shows General Ledger (GL) account, employee name, hire date, job title, rates, salary and other information. The rows are grouped into major expense categories such as commissions, bonuses, salary, overtime and bonus. Each row can be expanded to see individual employees (not visible in the example below) and their detailed information. At the bottom of the report, is a summary by GL account as well as a chart to visualize the same information. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Compensation analysis reports

Companies and organizations use compensation analysis reports to analyze payroll expenses using a professional and easy to read web-based report format. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Payroll department, a company can improve its payroll expense analysis as well as reduce the chances that managers make staffing decisions and budgets without a detailed understanding of actual employee compensation costs.

Compensation analysis report Example

Here is an example of a Workforce Compensation Report with Payroll Analysis.

Workforce Compensation Report with Payroll Analysis Example

Workforce Compensation Report with Payroll Analysis Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: CFOs, accountants, payroll managers, budget managers, human resource (HR) Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Compensation analysis reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Payroll Departments sometimes use several different Compensation analysis reports, along with HR reports, payroll budgets, staffing forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from Payroll and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite, Workday, ADP, Ceridian, Payroll Now and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Trial Balance Year-to-Date Trend Report Example

What is a Trial Balance Year-to-Date (YTD) Trend Report?

Trial balance trend reports are considered useful month end close tools and are often used by controllers and accountants to track changes in account balances for the current year. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it displays a balance check on top of the report along with a chart for the top 10 account balances. The first column shows the beginning balance for the year and then it lists each period up to the current month. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Trial Balance YTD Trend Reports

Companies and organizations use Trial Balance YTD Trend Reports to easily detect potential mistakes and anomalies by monitoring how any account balance change over time. When used as part of good business practices in a Accounting department, a company can improve its month end close process and speed as well as reduce the chances that accounting mistakes happen, like a posting to the wrong account.

Trial Balance YTD Trend Report Example

Here is an example of Trial Balance Monthly YTD Trend Report with Top 10 Chart and balance control.

Trial Balance Year-to-Date Trend Report Example

Trial Balance Year-to-Date Trend Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Controllers and Accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Trial Balance YTD Trend Reports

Progressive Accounting Departments sometimes use several different Trial Balance YTD Trend Reports, along with year-to-date profit & loss and balance sheet financial statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Working Capital Trend Analysis Report Example

What is a Working Capital Trend Analysis Report?

Working Capital trend reports are considered important liquidity analysis tools and are often used by CFOs and analysts to determine the company’s ability to pay for short term obligations. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it dynamically displays data from the past 13 months. The chart on the top of the report gives a clear idea of the historical trend in Working Capital (left axis) and the Current Ratio (right axis). The rows displays Current Assets and Current Liabilities and the Total rows are expandable so the user can see the detailed accounts or categories behind the totals. The last row calculates the Current Ratio. The orange row displays an automatically generated narrative about the current liquidity situation. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Working Capital Trend Reports

Companies and organizations use Working Capital Trend Reports to monitor the monthly swings in current assets and liabilities. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its liquidity as well as reduce the chances that issues arise because managers did not keep an eye on the company’s ability to pay for current obligations.

Working Capital Trend Report Example

Here is an example of a Working Capital Trend Report with graphical KPI analysis.

Working Capital Trend Analysis Report Example

Working Capital Trend Analysis Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: CFOs, Analysts, Treasurers and Controllers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Working Capital Trend Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Working Capital Trend Reports, along with trended financial statements,  accounts receivable (AR) aging reports, monthly cash flow-,  balance sheet- and income statements, liquidity dashboards, cash flow forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Cash Flow Report Example with KPI Analysis

What is a Cash Flow Report with KPI Analysis?

Cash Flow variance reports are considered essential monthly financial analysis tools and are used by CFOs and analysts to review the items that drive their net cash flow. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it is parameter driven and it can be run for any period and business unit. The main metrics in the cash flow statement are also shown graphically on the top of the report, including: 1) Cash from operating activities, 2) Cash from investing activities, 3) Cash from financing activities. The yellow row below the charts provides an automatic narrative to simplify analysis. The lower section of the report shows a typical cash flow report layout, including black and red indicators for variances. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Cash Flow Variance Reports

Companies and organizations use Cash Flow Variance Reports to closely monitor the financial drivers of cash flow and variances from last year and budget. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its liquidity as well as reduce the chances that it runs into problems because cash flow issues are detected too late for preventative decision to be made.

Cash Flow Variance Report Example

Here is an example of a Cash Flow Variance Report with KPIs and automated narrative.

Cash Flow Report Example with KPI Analysis

Cash Flow Report Example with KPI Analysis

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: CFOs, Analysts and Executives.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Cash Flow Variance Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Cash Flow Variance Reports, along with trended cash flow statements, monthly Balance Sheets, KPI dashboards, trended P&Ls and cash flow forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Trended Balance Sheet Example with KPIs

What is a Trended Balance Sheet with KPIs?

Trended Balance Sheet reports are considered month end analysis tools and are often used by CFOs and analysts to monitor and analyze anomalies and trends in assets and liabilities. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it dynamically displays each month up the the current period this year as well as the same months for the prior year. The charts on the top of the report speeds up analysis for key metrics like Current Assets, Fixed Assets, Current Liabilities, Other Liabilities and Equity. The rows in the report shows Account Categories and the user can expand each row to see individual GL accounts and their amounts. The yellow row below the charts is a customizable and automated narrative. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Trended Balance Sheet Reports

Companies and organizations use Trended Balance Sheet Reports to quickly detect changes over time and exceptions with assets or liabilities. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its decision speed as it relates to liquidity and other balance sheet metrics as well as reduce the chances that anomalies goes undetected for longer than necessary.

Trended Balance Sheet Report Example

Here is an example of a Trended Balance Sheet with KPIs and automated narrative.

Trended Balance Sheet Example with KPIs

Trended Balance Sheet Example with KPIs

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: CFOs, Analysts and Executives.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Trended Balance Sheet Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Trended Balance Sheet Reports, along with monthly Balance Sheet reports, KPI dashboards, trended P&Ls and cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Modern Balance Sheet Variance Report Example with KPI Analysis

What is a Modern Balance Sheet Variance Report with KPIs?

Balance Sheet variance reports are considered month end analysis tools and are often used by CFOs and analysts to track key metrics and their variances. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it enhances analysis by providing a three section report: 1) Charts for Assets, Cash and Ratios, 2) Automated narrative, 3) Balance sheet report. The user can drill down to see transaction detail. The latter shows current month versus prior month and prior year with variances. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Balance Sheet Variance Reports with KPIs

Companies and organizations use Balance Sheet Variance Reports with KPIs to easily analyze changes in assets and liabilities. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its monthly analysis as well as reduce the chances that managers miss important exceptions or changes.

Balance Sheet Variance Reports with KPI Example

Here is an example of a Balance Sheet Variance Report with KPI Analysis.

Modern Balance Sheet Variance Report Example with KPI Analysis

Modern Balance Sheet Variance Report Example with KPI Analysis

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: CFOs, Analysts and Executives.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Balance Sheet Variance Reports with KPIs

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Balance Sheet Variance Reports with KPIs, along with monthly Balance Sheet trend reports, KPI dashboards, trended P&Ls and cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Profit & Loss Report Example with Automated Full Year Estimate

What is a Profit & Loss Report with Automated Full Year Estimate?

Profit & Loss (P&L) estimate reports are considered important decision-making tools and are often used by CFOs and analysts to, on a monthly basis, get an automatic forecast for the full year. Some of the key functionality in this type of monthly estimate report is that it provides all-in-one analysis with graphics, narrative and a trended P&L report. The top of the report shows trend charts for Revenue, Gross Profit and Operating Income. Each chart contains data series for actual and budget for the current year and actual last year. The main section of the report displays actual for each month up to the current period and then dynamically pulls in budgets for the rest of the year to give a full year estimate. You find an example of this type of monthly estimate report below.

Purpose of Profit & Loss Estimate Reports

Companies and organizations use Profit & Loss Estimate Reports to get a continuous outlook for the full year. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its decision-making as well as reduce the chances that managers only look in the rear view mirror or analyze variances based in old, stale budgets.

Profit & Loss Estimate Report Example

Here is an example of a Profit & Loss Report with charts and automated full year estimate.

Profit & Loss Report Example with Automated Full Year Estimate

Profit & Loss Report Example with Automated Full Year Estimate

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Monthly estimate report?

The typical users of this type of monthly estimate report are: CFOs, Analysts and Executives.

Other Monthly estimate reports Often Used in Conjunction with Profit & Loss Estimate Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Profit & Loss Estimate Reports, along with monthly variance reports, KPI dashboards, trended balance sheets and cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Profit & Loss Report Example with Trend Analysis

What is a Profit & Loss Report with Trend Analysis?

Trended Profit & Loss (P&L) reports are considered important management tools and are often used by CFOs and analysts to track year-over-year revenue, expense and profit trends. Some of the key functionality in this type of visual financial report is that it provides deep analysis with three different sections: 1) Trend charts, 2) Automated narrative (yellow row in the example), 3) P&L content where the user can drill down to transaction detail. You find an example of this type of visual financial report below.

Purpose of Trended Profit & Loss Reports

Companies and organizations use Trended Profit & Loss Reports to easily detect and analyze swings in key revenue and expense figures for the current and prior years. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its decision-making as well as reduce the chances that managers miss important anomalies.

Trended Profit & Loss Report Example

Here is an example of a Trended Profit & Loss Report with charts and automated narrative.

P&L – Trend Analysis vs Prior Year

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Visual financial report?

The typical users of this type of visual financial report are: CFOs, Analysts and Executives.

Other Visual financial reports Often Used in Conjunction with Trended Profit & Loss Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Trended Profit & Loss Reports, along with monthly variance reports, KPI dashboards, trended balance sheets and cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

13 Month Rolling Profit & Loss Report Example

What is a 13 Month Rolling Profit & Loss Report?

Multi-month Rolling Profit & Loss reports are considered trend analysis tools and are often used by CFOs and analysts to look for significant upward or downwards trends in profitability. Some of the key functionality in this type of visual trend report is that it is parameter driven and based on the period the user runs it for, it will dynamically display the past thirteen months across the columns. The chart on the top of the report makes it easy to detect trends in Revenue, Gross Profit and Net Profit. The text in the yellow row below the chart provides an automatically generated narrative of essential information in the report. You find an example of this type of visual trend report below.

Purpose of 13 Month Profit & Loss Trend Reports

Companies and organizations use 13 Month Profit & Loss Trend Reports to easily track key P&L metrics backwards in time, including comparison to the same period in the prior year. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its reaction time to make decisions as well as reduce the chances that managers miss important trends and anomalies.

13 Month Profit & Loss Trend Report Example

Here is an example of a Trended 13 Month Profit & Loss Report with graphical analysis.

13 Month Rolling Profit & Loss Report Example

13 Month Rolling Profit & Loss Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Visual trend report?

The typical users of this type of visual trend report are: CFOs, Analysts and Executives.

Other Visual trend reports Often Used in Conjunction with 13 Month Profit & Loss Trend Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Month Profit & Loss Trend Reports, along with monthly variance reports, KPI dashboards, trended balance sheets and cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples