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Example of a Helpdesk Call Analysis Report for a Technology Company

What is a Helpdesk Call Analysis Report?

Call analytics reports are considered operational analysis tools and are often used by helpdesk managers and COOs to determine phone support quantity and efficiency. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it compares incoming calls with abandoned calls, real calls and spam calls. In the rows, the report groups company/helpdesk by region which provides useful benchmarking analysis. The pie charts on the top of the report helps with the quantitative and qualititative call comparisons. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Helpdesk Call Analysis Reports

Companies use Helpdesk Call Analysis Reports to make it easy for managers to quickly compare call statistics across helpdesk locations and by call type. When used as part of good business practices in a support department, a company can improve its helpdesk staff planning and use of technology to optimize the support operations as well as reduce the chances that helpdesk managers lose sight of the big picture related to call statistics and therefore make slower- or sub-optimal decisions.

Helpdesk Call Analysis Report Example

Here is an example of a detailed Call Statistics report for a technology company with multiple helpdesk teams.

Example of a Helpdesk Call Analysis Report for a Technology Company

Example of a Helpdesk Call Analysis Report for a Technology Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Helpdesk managers, COOs, support team leads.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Helpdesk Call Analysis Reports

Progressive support department Departments sometimes use several different Helpdesk Call Analysis Reports, along with helpdesk dashboards, support ticket reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of Waterfall Recurring Revenue Report for a Technology Company

What is a Waterfall Recurring Revenue Report?

Waterfall reports for recurring revenues are considered subscription analysis tools and are often used by sales executives and budgeting managers to track current and future recurring revenues. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it displays actual recurring revenues by month and shows how a sales amount has been spread into future months in the current calendar year. In the columns on the right, the running year-to-date amount is automatically calculated and compared to the budget, with a variance column on the far right (not visible in the screenshot below). You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Recurring Revenue Waterfall Reports

Tech companies use Recurring Revenue Waterfall Reports to easily track recognized and upcoming subscription revenue amounts from existing contracts. When used as part of good business practices in a sales or FP&A department, a company can improve its revenue visibility and cash flow planning as well as reduce the chances that sales execs and planners forecast revenues without full understanding of revenues booked into future months.

Recurring Revenue Waterfall Report Example

Here is an example of Recurring Revenue Waterfall Report.

Example of Waterfall Recurring Revenue Report for a Technology Company

Example of Waterfall Recurring Revenue Report for a Technology Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Sales executives, budget managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Recurring Revenue Waterfall Reports

Progressive sales or FP&A Departments sometimes use several different Recurring Revenue Waterfall Reports, along with sales reports, sales dashboards, recurring revenue dashboards, sales and revenue forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of an Actual and Estimated Project Hours Report for a Technology Company

What is an Actual and Estimated Project Hours Report?

Project reports showing actual and estimated hours are considered operational analysis tools and are often used by project managers to track consultant and project performance. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it is parameter driven and can be run for any month, entity and project(s). It compares the actual hours delivered versus the estimated hours and displays the variance amount and percent with exception highlighting. The rows can be expanded and collapsed and they group projects by consultant and region/entity. The chart on the top gives a clear picture of the grand total performance. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Hourly-focused Project Reports

Technology companies and their consulting services teams use Hourly-focused Project Reports to keep a keen eye on the the time they planned for their projects versus what they actually ended up providing to their clients. When used as part of good business practices in a Project Management department, a company can improve its estimate accuracy and therefore client satisfaction and profitability as well as reduce the chances that large number of non-billable hours occurs without proper analysis.

Hourly-focused Project Report Example

Here is an example of a Project Report with actual versus estimated hours and variances.

Example of an Actual and Estimated Project Hours Report for a Technology Company

Example of an Actual and Estimated Project Hours Report for a Technology Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Project Managers, Project Management Offices (PMO), Directors of Services, Consulting Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Hourly-focused Project Reports

Progressive Project Management Departments sometimes use several different Hourly-focused Project Reports, along with detailed project reports, project dashboards, billing reports, project budgets and forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Project Performance Report for a Technology Company

What is a Project Performance Report?

Project performance reports are considered operational analysis tools and are often used by managers to score, compare and analyze projects as it relates to current and potential delays. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it tracks projects with a score for Delays or Possible Delays. Within these two areas, the report scores both the related cost and the scheduling. Figures and color codes show if a project cost is over, under, or on budget, and if a schedule is behind, ahead or on target. The report can be filtered for any number of customers, locations and project categories. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Project Performance Reports

Companies use Project Performance Reports to optimize their ability to manage projects. When used as part of good business practices in a Project Management department, a company can improve its profitability and margins as well as reduce the chances that poor project delays are not consistently traced back to the main causes.

Project Performance Report Example

Here is an example of a Project Performance Report with scoring of actual and potential delays.

Example of a Project Performance Report for a Technology Company

Example of a Project Performance Report for a Technology Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Project Management Offices (PMO), Directors of Services, Consulting Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Project Performance Reports

Progressive Project Management Departments sometimes use several different Project Performance Reports, along with detailed project reports, project dashboards, billing reports, project budgets and forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Sales Report by Store and Region for a Retail Company

What is a Sales Report by Store and Region?

Retail sales reports by location are considered revenue analysis tools and are often used by corporate, regional and store managers to track sales performance for each store and the regions they roll up to. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it compares actual to last year and actual to budget for store- and regional sales. The year-to-date columns can be expanded to see each individual month. The traffic lights highlight important variances. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Sales Reports by Store and Region

Retail companies use Sales Reports by Store and Region to make it easy for managers to quickly get a complete picture of sales performance across all locations and geographies. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its corporate revenue analysis and decision-making as well as reduce the chances that poor performance goes undeteced for a longer time than necessary.

Sales Reports by Store and Regio Example

Here is an example of a self-service, web-based Retail Sales Report by store and region.

Example of a Sales Report by Store and Region for a Retail Company

Example of a Sales Report by Store and Region for a Retail Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Corporate executives, store managers, regional managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Sales Reports by Store and Region

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Sales Reports by Store and Region, along with sales forecasts and budgets, sales dashboards, profit & loss reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Consolidating Profit & Loss Report for a Retail Company

What is a Consolidating Profit & Loss Report for a Retail Company?

Consolidation reports are considered essential financial statements and are often used by accountants and controllers to show financial performance for individual stores and consolidated for the company. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it dynamically lists selected stores or regions across the columns with a consolidated total. The charts on the top of the reports provides easy comparisons. The report can be produced both for actual data as well as budgets and forecasts. The rows show a typical revenue and expense layout for a retail P&L report. The user can drill down on any figure to see the underlying detail. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Consolidating Profit & Loss Reports

Retail companies use Consolidating Profit & Loss Reports to give corporate managers a quick and easy monthly snapshot of profitability across all retail locations as well as in total. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its performance analysis and speed up decision-making as well as reduce the chances that weak profitability goes undetected for a longer time than necessary.

Consolidating Retail Profit & Loss Report Example

Here is an example of a Consolidating Profit & Loss Report with store locations across the columns.

Example of a Consolidating Profit & Loss Report for a Retail Company

Example of a Consolidating Profit & Loss Report for a Retail Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Corporate executives, controllers, store managers, regional managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Consolidating Profit & Loss Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Consolidating Profit & Loss Reports, along with sales forecasts and budgets, balance sheets, cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of Grants Overview Report for Nonprofits

What is a Grants Overview Report?

Grant reports are considered valuable management tools and are often used by financial- , planning- and grant managers to better manage grants and the programs they support. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it shows granted, encumbered and balance amounts per program, grant and grantee. The report can be run for any month and with various filters. The chart on the top of the report displays the totals graphically. Users can drill down on any amount to see the underlying transaction detail. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Grants Overview Reports with Encumbrance and Balance Information

Nonprofits use Grants Overview Reports with Encumbrance and Balance Information to easily monitor grant balances and the programs they fund. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its analysis and planning as it related to grants and programs as well as reduce the chances of any surprises with over- or underspending.

Grants Overview Reports with Encumbrance and Balance Information Example

Here is an example of a Grants Summary Report with Encumbrance and Balance information.

Example of Grants Overview Report for Nonprofits - with Encumbrance and Balance

Example of Grants Overview Report for Nonprofits

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Finance teams, grant- and program managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Grants Overview Reports with Encumbrance and Balance Information

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Grants Overview Reports with Encumbrance and Balance Information, along with financial statements, budget models, grants dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of Grants Paid Report for Nonprofits

What is a Grants Paid Report?

Grant reports are considered important grant management tools and are often used by financial- , program- and grant managers to plan initiatives and manage grants and program funding. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it displays actual grant amounts paid out versus budget, both for the current month and year to date. The variance columns uses exception highlighting to help users find significant deviations from planned payments. The grant payments are grouped by initiative and program as can be seen in the rows. The charts at the bottom helps users focus on the relative size of the various metrics. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Grants Paid Reports

Nonprofit organizations use Grants Paid Reports to manage and analyze actual grant payments versus budgeted amounts. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, an organization can improve its grants management and initiative analysis capabilities as well as reduce the chances that over- or underspending occurs.

Grants Paid Report Example

Here is an example of a Grants Paid report with actual spend versus budget.

Example of Grants Paid Report for Nonprofits

Example of Grants Paid Report for Nonprofits

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Finance teams, grants- and program managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Grants Paid Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Grants Paid Reports, along with financial statements, budget models, grants dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of an Executive Dashboard for a Manufacturing Business

What is an Executive Dashboard for a Manufacturing Business?

Executive Dashboards are considered management monitoring tools and are often used by manufacturing leaders to keep an eye on key performance metrics. Some of the special functionality in this type of dashboard report is that it is parameter driven and can be viewed for any month and plant facility. The charts show revenue and cost of goods sold (COS) trends and comparison to budgets. The dashboard also shows sales by customer and product, as well as top suppliers based on purchases. Finally, it tracks inventory by distribution center. You find an example of this type of dashboard report below.

Purpose of Executive Manufacturing Dashboards

Manufacturing companies use Executive Dashboards to provide top managers with an easy way to monitor KPIs and trends in a self-service, web interface that they can access from anywhere. When used as part of good business practices in an executive department, a company can improve its reaction time and speed of decision-making as well as reduce the chances that important metrics go undetected for weeks or months.

Executive Manufacturing Dashboard Example

Here is an example of an Executive Dashboard for a manufacturing business.

Example of an Executive Dashboard for a Manufacturing Business

Example of an Executive Dashboard for a Manufacturing Business

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard report?

The typical users of this type of dashboard report are: CEOs, COOs, CFOs and Board Members.

Other Dashboard reports Often Used in Conjunction with Executive Manufacturing Dashboards

Progressive Executive Departments sometimes use several different Executive Manufacturing Dashboards, along with profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of Capacity Utilization Dashboard with Manufacturing Plant Comparisons

What is a Capacity Utilization Dashboard?

Utilization analysis dashboards with comparative analysis are considered benchmarking tools and are often used by plant- and operations managers to track utilization by facility and to easily see exceptions. Some of the key functionality in this type of dashboard report is that it provides utilization analysis by individual plant and it also compares all the plants in the corporation. You find an example of this type of dashboard report below.

Purpose of Capacity Utilization Dashboards

Manufacturing companies use Capacity Utilization Dashboards to monitor plant performance and trends with utilization metrics. When used as part of good business practices, a company can improve its utilization tracking and analysis as well as reduce the chances that any individual plant becomes inefficient without managers quickly detecting it.

Capacity Utilization Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Capacity Utilization Dashboard to track multiple manufacturing plants.

Example of a Capacity Utilization Dashboard with Manufacturing Plant Comparisons

Example of a Capacity Utilization Dashboard with Manufacturing Plant Comparisons

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard report?

The typical users of this type of dashboard report are: Executives and Plant Managers.

Other Dashboard reports Often Used in Conjunction with Capacity Utilization Dashboards

Progressive manufacturing companies sometimes use several different Capacity Utilization Dashboards, along with production dashboards, inventory reports, sales forecast, sales reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples