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Example of a Student Enrollment Dashboard for Higher Education Institutions

What is a Student Enrollment Dashboard?

Enrollment Dashboards are considered student body analysis tools and are used by Enrollment Officers and University Administrators to monitor enrollment statistics. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it enables analysis of the incoming student population from six different perspectives: 1) KPIs with Total applicants, Admitted students, and Admission rate (%), 2) Top five recruiting sources by number of applicants, 3) Top five schools by applicants, 4) Table with applicants by school with metrics for applicant numbers, admitted students, and admission rate, 5) Applicants by school ranked by number of applicants, and 6) Applicant and admission trend by semester. The user can filter the dashboard by year and campus using the parameters on the left side of the screen. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Student Enrollment Dashboards

Universities and colleges use Student Enrollment Dashboards to give administrators an easy way to monitor enrollment trends and statistics. When used as part of good business practices in Enrollment and Academic departments, an organization can improve its student-related strategies including recruiting and academic offerings, and it can reduce the chances that poor visibility to essential enrollment KPIs leads to sub-optimal policies and planning.

Example of a Student Enrollment Dashboard

Here is an example of a Student Enrollment Dashboard with applicant statistics and admission rates.

Example of a Student Enrollment Dashboard for Higher Education Institutions

Example of a Student Enrollment Dashboard for Higher Education Institutions

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: University officials, boards, enrollment officers, recruiting officers, strategic planners, academic officers, student administrators,.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Student Enrollment Dashboards

Progressive Enrollment and Academic departments sometimes use several different Student Enrollment Dashboards, along with Detailed enrollment reports, academic summary reports, financial dashboards, annual budgets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from student information systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Grant Dashboard for Higher Education Institutions

Grant Dashboard for Higher Education Institutions

What is a Grant Dashboard?

Grant Dashboards are considered financial analysis tools and are used by Financial Executives and Grant Managers to monitor grant metrics and related activities. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it enables analysis of grants from six different perspectives: 1) KPIs for granted amounts, requested amounts and granted as a percent of requested amounts, 2) Granted and requested amounts ranked by school, 3) Granted and requested amounts ranked by major, 4) Table with grants by school and measures for granted amount, requested amount, variance %, and variance amount, 5) Table with grants by type (based on filter seen in lower left corner of dashboard), and 6) Grants by type comparison chart. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Grant Dashboards

Universities and colleges use Grant Dashboards to have an easy way to monitor the organization’s grant activities. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Grant Management departments, an organization can improve its grant program strategies and decisions, and it can reduce the chances that leaders don’t have a clear understanding of grant requests and uses.

Example of a Grant Dashboard

Here is an example of a Grant Dashboard with KPIs and ranked comparisons of granted and requested amounts seen from various perspectives.

Example of a Grant Dashboard for Higher Education Institutions

Example of a Grant Dashboard for Higher Education Institutions

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: University officials, boards, CFOs, grant managers, budget managers, strategic planners.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Grant Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Grant Management departments sometimes use several different Grant Dashboards, along with Detailed grant reports, financial dashboards, financial statements, detailed budgets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Student Demographics and KPI Dashboard

What is a Student Demographics and KPI Dashboard?

Student Dashboards are considered operational analysis tools and are used by university executives, enrollment- and academic officers to get a single view of key metrics related to the student body. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides analysis of student KPIs from nine different perspectives, including: 1) Total-, graduate and undergraduate student count, 2) Top five majors by student count, 3) Student count by ethnicity, 4) Student count by category (continuing graduate/undergraduate, transfer, first time), 5) Table with students by name, gender, GPA, level and ethnicity, 6) Students by gender, 7) Students by marital status, 8) GPA by ethnicity, and 9) GPA by visa type. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Student Dashboards

Universities and colleges use Student Demographic and KPI Dashboard to give officials an easy way to analyze their student body and potential emerging trends. When used as part of good business practices in Enrollment and Academic departments, an organization can improve its improve and speed up decisions and planning related to their student strategies, and it can reduce the chances that policies are sub-optimized due to lack of current, easily understandable data.

Example of a Student Demographic and KPI Dashboard

Here is an example of a Student Analysis Dashboard with important metrics and trends related to enrolled students.

Example of a Student Demographics and KPI Dashboard

Example of a Student Demographics and KPI Dashboard

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: University officials, boards, enrollment officers, academic officers, budget managers, strategic planners.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Student Demographic and KPI Dashboards

Progressive Enrollment and Academic departments sometimes use several different Student Dashboards, along with detailed enrollment reports, academic summary reports, financial dashboards, detailed budgets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Financial Simulation Dashboard for Higher Education Institutions

What is a Financial Simulation Dashboard for Higher Education?

Financial Simulation Dashboards are considered modelling tools and are used by CFOs and analysts to quickly and easily perform what-if analysis to forecast potential outcomes for revenues, expenses and the resulting surplus or deficit. They can use this interactive simulation dashboard to estimate monthly results, and they can also use it to set targets as input for the annual budget or mid-year forecasts.

Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides “sliders” that the user move left or right to make estimates, and the results are immediately displayed in the Surplus/Deficit gauge and charts. The dashboard has the following components: 1) A slider to set the target Margin in %. This then calculates the Margin amount and displays the gap to get there based on the Revenues and Expenses in the simulation, 2) Sliders to adjust all major revenue categories up or down. In the example, these categories include: Tuition, web courses, educational sponsors (grants, donations, etc.), parking fees, consulting fees, 3) Sliders to adjust major Expense components. In the example, these include: Repairs and maintenance, scholarships, research, other expenses, 4) Gauge that calculates the resulting Surplus (or deficit), and 5) Two pie charts that show the breakdown of the simulated revenues and expenses. The filters on the far left enable the user to create scenarios for specific schools, campuses and years. You find an example of this type of interactive dashboard below.

Purpose of Financial Simulation Dashboards

Universities and colleges use Financial Simulation Dashboards to give financial managers a very easy way to create scenarios, and to do what-if analysis and modelling. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, an organization can optimize its decisions by improving planning agility and speed, and it can reduce the chances that cumbersome models limits the organization’s planning capabilities to only be focused on the annual budget process.

Example of a Financial Simulation Dashboard

Here is an example of a Financial Modelling Dashboard with sliders to simulate revenues and expenses and to instantly forecast potential outcomes.

Example of a Financial Simulation Dashboard for Higher Education Institutions

Example of a Financial Simulation Dashboard for Higher Education Institutions

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: CFOs, analysts, budget managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Financial Simulation Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Financial Simulation Dashboards, along with Financial statements, financial dashboards, annual budget models, forecast models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Expense Analysis Dashboard for Higher Education Institutions

What is an Expense Analysis Dashboard for Higher Education?

Expense Dashboard are considered financial analysis tools and are used by CFOs and Accounting Managers to quickly understand uses of funds and variances versus plan and prior year. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides simple way to analyze operating expenses from six different perspectives: 1) Top five expense sources with comparison of actual, actual last year and budget. Sources listed in the example include: Repairs and maintenance, scholarships, research, books and library, licenses and other, 2) Total annual expenses with actual and budget comparison, 3) Table with ranked listing of all expense categories and comparison of actual figures with actual last year, variance (%), budget and budget variance, 4) Build up of components of actual expenses, 5) Total expenses by school, and 6) Expenses by campus. The user can apply filters using the “Filter Menu” on top of the screen. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Expense Analysis Dashboards

Universities and colleges use Expense Dashboards to provide executives with different ways to slice and compare operating expenses. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, an organization can improve its decision speed and surplus/deficit, and it can reduce the chances that leaders miss areas of unplanned overspending.

Example of an Expense Dashboard

Here is an example of an Expense Analysis Dashboard with comparison of different uses of funds as well as budget variances.

Example of a Expense Analysis Dashboard for Higher Education Institutions

Example of a Expense Analysis Dashboard for Higher Education Institutions

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: CFO, accounting managers, budget managers, cost accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Expense Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Expense Dashboards, along with Financial statements, detailed expense reports, annual budgets, KPI dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Revenue Dashboard for Higher Education Institutions

What is a Revenue Dashboard for Higher Education Institutions?

Revenue Dashboard are considered funding analysis tools and are used by executives and CFOs to quickly understand revenue sources and variances. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it gives the user a simple way to analyze funding sources from six different perspectives: 1) Top five revenue sources with comparison of actual, actual last year and budget. Sources listed in the example include: Tuition, Web courses, Education sponsor, Consulting fees, Parking fees, 2) Total annual revenue with actual and budget comparison, 3) Table with ranked listing of all revenue sources and comparison of actual figures with actual last year, variance (%), budget and budget variance, 4) Build up of components of actual revenue, 5) Revenue by campus, and 6) Revenue by school. The user can apply filters using the “Filter Menu” on top of the screen. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Higher Ed Revenue Dashboards

Universities and colleges use Higher Ed Revenue Dashboards to provide executives with different ways to slice and compare revenue streams. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, an organization can improve its decision speed and revenues, and it can reduce the chances that leaders miss important performance issues.

Example of a Higher Ed Revenue Dashboard

Here is an example of a Revenue Dashboard with comparison of different sources of funds as well as budget variances.

Example of a Revenue Dashboard for Higher Education Institutions

Example of a Revenue Dashboard for Higher Education Institutions

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Boards, Executives and Office of Finance.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Higher Ed Revenue Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Higher Ed Revenue Dashboards, along with Financial statements, detailed funding reports, annual budgets, KPI dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Grant Dashboard Example for Higher Education Institutions

What is a Grant Dashboard?

Grant Dashboards are considered analytical management tools and are used by grant managers and financial officers to analyze KPIs related to their grant activities. Some of the main functionality in this type of visualization report is that it gives six graphical views of important KPIs in this area. They include: 1) Granted vs requested revenue by type, 2) Granted vs requested revenue by school, 3) Granted vs requested revenue by major, 4) Grant amount trend, 5) Encumbered amount trend, and 6) Grant requested by school. Below the charts is a tabular report with the figures that support the charts. You find an example of this type of visualization report below.

Purpose of Grant Dashboards

Universities and colleges use Grant Dashboards to offer managers an easy way to get a picture of grant requests and revenues from different viewpoints. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department and in an Office of Contract and Grant Administration, a higher education institution can improve its grant strategies and policies, and it can reduce the chances that the decisions related grant revenues and requests are sub optimized.

Grant Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Grant Dashboard with requested and granted amounts as well as encumbrances.

Higher Ed – Grant Dashboard

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Visualization report?

The typical users of this type of visualization report are: CFOs, budget managers, analysts, deans, grant managers.

Other Visualization Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Grant Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Office of Contract and Grant Administration departments sometimes use several different Grant Dashboards, along with detailed grant reports, encumbrance reports, grant budgets, sources and uses of funds statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from grant management software and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Higher Education - Student Enrollment Dashboard Example

What is a Student Enrollment Dashboard?

Student Enrollment Dashboards are considered operational analysis tools and are used by enrollment officers and dean of students to analyze student demographics and expected headcount. Some of the main functionality in this type of visualization report is that it provides insight into student statistics from six different KPI perspectives: 1) Applicants by semester/quarter, 2) Enrollment by ethnicity, 3) Enrollment by gender, 4) Enrollment trend, 5) Top 5 enrollment figures by school, 6) Enrollment by campus. All the figures from the charts are also listed below the dashboard in a tabular report format. You find an example of this type of visualization report below.

Purpose of Student Enrollment Dashboards

Universities and colleges use Student Enrollment Dashboards to provide their decisionmakers with an easy way to understand enrollment data. When used as part of good business practices in a Student Recruiting and Enrollment department, a higher education institution can improve its strategies and initiatives related to student headcount and demographics as well as associated financial planning. It can also reduce the chances that the employees make inferior decisions because they lack quick and easy access to these key statistics.

Student Enrollment Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Student Enrollment Dashboard with applicant metrics and enrollment trends.

Higher Education - Student Enrollment Dashboard Example

Higher Education – Student Enrollment Dashboard Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Visualization report?

The typical users of this type of visualization report are: Enrollment officers, Dean of Students, School administrators and Planners.

Other Visualization Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Student Enrollment Dashboards

Progressive Student Recruiting and Enrollment departments sometimes use several different Student Enrollment Dashboards, along with detailed enrollment reports, student dashboards, staff and tuition revenue budgets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from admission and enrollment management software, student information systems as well as enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Higher Education Revenue Dashboard Example

What is a Higher Education Revenue Dashboard?

Revenue dashboards are considered executive analysis tools and are used by financial officers and leaders to analyze trends and budget variances for the institution’s revenues. Some of the main functionality in this type of visualization report is that it provides insight into revenues from five different perspectives: 1) Actual versus budget for the current period, 2) Actual versus budget broken down by major revenue categories such as for Alumni, Tuition and Other, 3) Actual and budget revenue trend, 4) Revenue trend consolidated for all schools and/or campuses, and 5) Revenue for the current period broken down by detail account. You find an example of this type of visualization report below.

Purpose of Revenue Dashboards

Universities and colleges use Revenue Dashboards to provide executives with an easy, self-service method of analyzing essential revenue metrics. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a higher education institution can improve its revenue-related strategies, and it can reduce the chances that the decisions are slowed down because managers lack clear and on-demand revenue insights.

Revenue Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Revenue Dashboard with trends and budget variances.

Higher Education Revenue Dashboard Example

Higher Education Revenue Dashboard Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Visualization report?

The typical users of this type of visualization report are: Financial officers, executives, boards.

Other Visualization and Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Revenue Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Revenue Dashboards, along with  trial balances, consolidation reports, sources and uses of funds, balance sheets, KPI dashboards, transactional revenue reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Higher Education Reporting - Intercampus Matching Report Example

What is an Intercampus Matching Report?

Intercampus Matching Reports are considered month end closing tools  and are used by accountants to automate the reconciliation of eliminations of financial transactions when campuses lend, borrow, buy or sell to each other. Some of the main functionality in this type of matching report is that it automatically matches monthly intercampus transactions. For each “due to” and “due from” account pair, the report shows a total with a green color if there is a complete match and a red color if there is a difference. You find an example of this type of matching report below.

Purpose of Intercampus Matching Reports

Universities and colleges use Intercampus Matching Reports to automatically match internal transactions between their campuses. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a higher education institution can improve its month end close process, and it can reduce the chances that the there are accounting mistakes when campus financials are consolidated for the entire organization and all its entities.

Intercampus Matching Report Example

Here is an example of an Intercampus Matching Report with Exception Colors and automated reconciliation.

Higher Education Reporting - Intercampus Matching Report Example

Higher Education Reporting – Intercampus Matching Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Matching report?

The typical users of this type of matching report are: Financial officers, controllers, accountants.

Other Matching Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Intercampus Matching Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Intercampus Matching Reports, along with  trial balances, consolidating multi-entity reports, sources and uses of funds, balance sheets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples