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Example of a Yield and Rate Analysis Report by Bank Branch

What is a Yield and Rate Analysis Report by Bank Branch?

Yield and Interest Rate Reports are considered analysis tools and are used by Executives and CFOs to analyze actual and budgeted rates and yields by branch. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it is parameter-driven by branch and period and it compares current month metrics with prior year and budget. The rows show interest rates, fees and yields per financial product, including: Loans, Leases, and Securities. The last section (not visible in the screenshot below) includes Demand Deposits with interest expense and interest rate. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Yield and Rate Reports

Banks use Yield and Rate Reports to enable executives and branch managers to get a single view of key financial metrics for their product offerings. When used as part of good business practices in Investment- and Finance departments, a bank can improve its product offerings and profitability, and it can reduce the chances that a branch is offering terms that not driving the same results as that of other branches.

Example of a Yield and Rate Report

Here is an example of a Yield and Rate Report by Branch with comparison of actual and budget figures.

Example of a Yield and Rate Analysis Report by Bank Branch

Example of a Yield and Rate Analysis Report by Bank Branch

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Executives, branch managers, finance leaders, analysts.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Yield and Rate Reports

Progressive Investment- and Finance departments sometimes use several different Yield and Rate Reports, along with securities transaction reports, investment dashboards, KPI dashboards, securities dashboards, branch benchmarking reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from bank systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Securities by Category Report for Banks

What is a Securities by Category Report for Banks?

Securities Reports are considered portfolio analysis tools and are used by investment managers and analysts to monitor market- and book values of different security categories. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it is parameter driven and for any select group of securities it displays book- and market values as well as variances between these. The security categories are listed in the rows. Across the columns you find: Book value and its yield- and life metrics, market value with yield and life metrics, and variances between book and life metrics. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Securities by Category Reports

Banks use Securities by Category Reports to analyze book- and market value KPIs and variances. When used as part of good business practices in Investment- and Finance Departments, a bank can improve its securities strategies and profitability, and it can reduce the chances that lack of easy on-demand reports reduces the ability to make faster and better decisions.

Example of a Securities by Category Report

Here is an example of a Securities by Category Report with value and yield metrics and variances.

Example of a Securities by Category Report for Banks

Example of a Securities by Category Report for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Investment managers, securities portfolio managers, analysts.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Securities by Category Reports

Progressive Investment- and Finance departments sometimes use several different Securities by Category Reports, along with securities transaction reports, investment dashboards, KPI dashboards, securities dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from securities management software and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Trended Securities Summary Portfolio Report for Banks

What is a Trended Securities Summary Report for Banks?

Trended Securities Summary Reports are considered monthly trend analysis tools and are used by investment managers and analysts to monitor monthly trends in their portfolio. Some of the main functionality in this type of monthly trend report is that it dynamically lists months up to the current period across the columns with market yield in percent and amount figures down the rows. The top section (not visible in the screenshot below) shows the current market value of each security type. Color coding at the cell level helps the user quickly see high and low performing months and securities. You find an example of this type of monthly trend report below.

Purpose of Trended Securities Portfolio Reports

Banks use Trended Securities Portfolio Reports to easily discover trends and compare security values and yields. When used as part of good business practices in Investment- and Finance Departments, a bank can improve its securities strategies and profitability, and it can reduce the chances that important trends and outliers are discovered later than necessary.

Example of a Trended Securities Portfolio Report

Here is an example of a Trended Securities Summary Report with monthly values and yields by security category.

Example of a Trended Securities Summary Portfolio Report for Banks

Example of a Trended Securities Summary Portfolio Report for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Monthly Trend Report?

The typical users of this type of monthly trend report are: Investment managers, securities portfolio managers, analysts.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Trended Securities Portfolio Reports

Progressive Investment- and Finance departments sometimes use several different Securities Portfolio Reports, along with securities transaction reports, investment dashboards, KPI dashboards, securities dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from securities management software and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Securities Summary Portfolio Report for Banks

What is a Securities Summary Portfolio Report for Banks?

Securities Portfolio Reports are considered analysis tools and are used by investment managers and analysts to monitor the market- and book values of different securities. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard report is that it combines charts, figures and exception highlighting to optimize analysis. The top left chart shows book value of securities on the left axis and yield on the right axis. The top right chart shows market value of securities on the left axis and yield on the right axis. The body of the report lists securities down the rows. The columns include: Book value, Gross Yield, Gross Life, Book Value Yield, Book Value Life, Market Value, Gross Yield, Gross Life, Market Yield, Market Life, Market versus Book Value Variance, Yield Variance, and Life Variance. You find an example of this type of dashboard report below.

Purpose of Security Summary Portfolio Reports

Banks use Security Summary Portfolio Reports to give managers an easy way to compare book value with market value and analyze the variances. When used as part of good business practices in Investment departments, a bank can improve its securities strategies and profitability, and it can reduce the chances that managers react slowly to significant book to market value variances.

Example of a Security Summary Portfolio Report

Here is an example of a graphical securities portfolio summary report with details for book and market value metrics.

Example of a Securities Summary Portfolio Report for Banks

Example of a Securities Summary Portfolio Report for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard Report?

The typical users of this type of dashboard report are: Investment managers, securities portfolio managers, analysts.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Security Summary Portfolio Reports

Progressive Investment departments sometimes use several different Security Portfolio Reports, along with securities transactions reports, investment dashboards, KPI dashboards, securities dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from securities management systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Yield and Rate Analysis Report by Credit Union Branch

What is a Yield and Rate Analysis Report?

Yield and Interest Rate Reports are considered analysis tools and are used by Managers and CFOs to analyze actual and budgeted rates and yields by credit union branch. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it is parameter-driven by branch and period and it compares current month metrics with prior year and budget. The rows show interest rates, fees and yields per financial product, including: Loans, Leases, and Securities. The last section (not visible in the screenshot below) includes Demand Deposits with interest expense and interest rate. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Yield and Rate Reports

Credit Unions use Yield and Rate Reports to enable executives and branch managers to get a single view of key financial metrics for their product offerings. When used as part of good business practices in Investment- and Finance departments, a company can improve its product offerings and profitability, and it can reduce the chances that a branch is giving members terms that are not driving the same results as that of other branches.

Example of a Yield and Rate Report

Here is an example of a Yield and Rate Report by Branch and it provides analysis of actual and budget figures.

Example of a Yield and Rate Analysis Report by Credit Union Branch

Example of a Yield and Rate Analysis Report by Credit Union Branch

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Executives, branch managers, finance leaders, analysts.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Yield and Rate Reports

Progressive Investment- and Finance departments sometimes use several different Yield and Rate Reports, along with securities transaction reports, investment dashboards, KPI dashboards, securities dashboards, branch benchmarking reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from loan management systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Securities by Category Report for Credit Unions

What is a Securities by Category Report?

Securities Reports are considered portfolio analysis tools and are used by investment managers and analysts to analyze market- and book values of different security categories. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it is parameter driven and for any select group of securities it displays book- and market values as well as variances between these. The security categories are listed in the rows. Across the columns you find: Book value and its yield and life metrics, market value with yield and life metrics, and variances between book and life metrics. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Securities by Category Reports

Credit Unions use Securities by Category Reports to analyze book- and market value KPIs and variances. When used as part of good business practices in Investment- and Finance departments, a company can improve its securities strategies and profitability, and it can reduce the chances that a lack of easy on-demand reports reduces the ability to make faster and better decisions.

Example of a Securities by Category Report

Here is an example of a Securities by Category Report with value and yield metrics and variances as well as actual to budget comparisons.

Example of a Securities by Category Report for Credit Unions

Example of a Securities by Category Report for Credit Unions

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Investment managers, securities portfolio managers, analysts.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Securities by Category Reports

Progressive Investment- and Finance departments sometimes use several different Securities by Category Reports, along with securities transaction reports, investment dashboards, KPI dashboards, securities dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from portfolio management software and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Trended Securities Summary Portfolio Report for Credit Unions

What is a Trended Securities Summary Report?

Trended Securities Summary Reports are considered monthly analysis tools and are used by investment managers and analysts to monitor monthly trends in their portfolios. Some of the main functionality in this type of monthly trend report is that it dynamically lists months up to the current period across the columns with market values and yields in percent and amount figures down the rows. The top section (not visible in the screenshot below) shows the current market value of each security type, while the bottom section shows the yields. Color coding at the cell level helps the user quickly see high and low performing months and securities. You find an example of this type of monthly trend report below.

Purpose of Trended Securities Summary Portfolio Reports

Credit Unions use Trended Securities Portfolio Summary Reports to easily discover trends and compare security values and yields. When used as part of good business practices in Investment- and Finance Departments, a company can improve its securities strategies and profitability, and it can reduce the chances that important trends and outliers are discovered later than necessary.

Example of a Trended Securities Summary Portfolio Report

Here is an example of a Trended Securities Summary Report with monthly values and yields by security category as well as actual to budget comparisons.

Example of a Trended Securities Summary Portfolio Report for Credit Unions

Example of a Trended Securities Summary Portfolio Report for Credit Unions

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Monthly trend report?

The typical users of this type of monthly trend report are: Investment managers, securities portfolio managers, analysts.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Trended Securities Portfolio Reports

Progressive Investment- and Finance departments sometimes use several different Trended Securities Portfolio Reports, along with securities transaction reports, investment dashboards, KPI dashboards, securities dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from portfolio management software and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Securities Summary Portfolio Report for Credit Unions

What is a Securities Summary Portfolio Report?

Securities Portfolio Reports are considered analysis tools and are used by investment managers and analysts to analyze market- and book values of different securities. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard report is that it combines charts, figures and exception highlighting to optimize analysis. The top left chart shows book value of securities on the left axis and yield on the right axis. The top right chart shows market value of securities on the left axis and yield on the right axis. The body of the report lists securities down the rows. The columns include: Book value, Gross Yield, Gross Life, Book Value Yield, Book Value Life, Market Value, Gross Yield, Gross Life, Market Yield, Market Life, Market versus Book Value Variance, Yield Variance, and Life Variance. You find an example of this type of dashboard report below.

Purpose of Security Summary Portfolio Reports

Credit Unions use Security Summary Reports to give managers an easy way to compare book value with market value and analyze the variances. When used as part of good business practices in Investment Departments, a company can improve its securities strategies and profitability, and it can reduce the chances that managers react slowly to significant book to market value variances.

Example of a Security Summary Portfolio Report

Here is an example of a graphical securities portfolio summary report with details for book and market value metrics as well as actual to budget comparisons.

Example of a Securities Summary Portfolio Report for Credit Unions

Example of a Securities Summary Portfolio Report for Credit Unions

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard report?

The typical users of this type of dashboard report are: Investment managers, securities portfolio managers, analysts.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Security Summary Portfolio Reports

Progressive Investment departments sometimes use several different Security Portfolio Reports, along with securities transaction reports, investment dashboards, KPI dashboards, securities dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Securities Dashboard for Banks

What is a Securities Dashboard for Banks?

Securities Dashboards are considered financial instrument analysis tools and are used by executives and financial managers to analyze key metrics for the bank’s financial instruments. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it track performance metrics from three different perspectives, including: 1) Tree map showing market value for the banks securities, 2) Ranked comparisons of book value and yield per financial instrument, and 3) Ranked comparisons of book value and yield per instrument. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Securities Dashboards

Banks use Securities Dashboards to give leaders and analysts a single screen to quickly see values and yields related to their financial instruments. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, a company can improve its decision-making and increase profitability, and it can reduce the chances that leaders miss important trends and KPI statuses.

Example of a Securities Dashboard

Here is an example of a Securities Dashboard with KPIs for market values, book values and yields.

Example of a Securities Dashboard for Banks

Example of a Securities Dashboard for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, CFOs, analysts, securities managers, investment managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Securities Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Securities Dashboards, along with detailed securities dashboards, securities reports, investment reports, financial statements, forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from financial investment systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Yield Variance Report for a Manufacturing Company

What is a Yield Variance Report?

Yield reports are considered production analysis tools and are used by production- and plant managers to analyze actual versus standard yield and compare the variances across manufacturing plants. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it is parameter driven so the user can run it for any period and any number of plants. One report per plant is automatically generated and displayed in the tabs at the bottom. Within a single report (which is for one plant), the products are shown down the rows and the columns display: Actual yield, Standard yield, Yield variance, Cost, and Yield loss. The last row at the bottom displays totals. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Yield Variance Reports

Manufacturers use Yield Variance Reports to help managers get a clear picture of production efficiency across their plants. When used as part of good business practices in a Production department, an organization can improve its production expense planning and capital investment strategies as well as reduce the chances that executives don’t have a good visibility to whether any individual plant underperforms as it relates to its yields.

Yield Variance Report Example

Here is an example of a Yield Variance Report with separate tabs (see bottom) per plant.

Yield Variance Report for a Manufacturing Company

Yield Variance Report for a Manufacturing Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Production managers and product managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Yield Variance Reports

Progressive Production departments sometimes use several different Yield Variance Reports, along with production dashboards, inventory reports, costing reports, benchmark dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples