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Competitor Trend Analysis Report Example

What is a Competitor Trend Analysis Report?

Competitor analysis reports are considered benchmarking tools and are often used by CFOs, executives and analysts to track the performance and trends of similar or competing organizations. Some of the key functionality in this type of KPI benchmark report is that it is based on available data from competitors. Often, this is data from a web-site like Yahoo Finance or a government web-site like Edgar. The example consists of eight charts, each one displaying the trend for a specific metric for the past eight quarters. The metrics include: Current Ratio, Return on Assets, Return on Equity, Profit Margin, Gross Margin, Debt to Equity, Revenue and Revenue Growth. You find an example of this type of KPI benchmark report below.

Purpose of Competitor Analysis Reports

Companies and organizations use Competitor Analysis Reports to monitor the performance and trends of comparative businesses to know if their own business if falling behind or getting ahead. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Executive department, a company can improve its strategies as well as reduce the chances that performance targets, budgets and tactics are misaligned with the industry.

Competitor Analysis Report Example

Here is an example of a Competitor Performance Analysis Report with quarterly trend charts.

Competitor Trend Analysis Report Example

Competitor Trend Analysis Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of KPI benchmark report?

The typical users of this type of KPI benchmark report are: CFOs, executives, board members, and analysts.

Other KPI benchmark reports Often Used in Conjunction with Competitor Analysis Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Executive Departments sometimes use several different Competitor Analysis Reports, along with benchmarking dashboards, comparative reports, KPI reports, strategy summaries and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from web sites like Yahoo Finance, Edgar or if the comparisons are to companies in e.g. the same corporate group, the data could come directly from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Return on Investment (ROI) Report Example for a Corporate Web-site

What is a Return on Investment (ROI) Report for a Web-site and Related Marketing?

Website efficiency reports are considered operational reports and are often used by marketing executives and campaign managers to analyze how well online marketing efforts are resulting in lead conversions through the corporate website. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it pulls web visitor data from Google Analytics, lead conversions from the company’s CRM system, and marketing expenses the ERP system. The report’s columns compare this data from the most recent rolling 12 months with the 12 months prior to that. The variance column shows the growth or decline in visitors, conversions and associated marketing costs. The “magic number” in the report is the Marketing cost per Conversion. In short, this tells executives and marketing personnel the ROI (in terms of cost per converted lead). The lower the cost is, the higher the potential financial return is to the company. The rest of the report provides graphical analysis and summary metrics regarding the web traffic itself.. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Website ROI Reports

Companies and organizations use Website ROI Reports to easily show executives the results of their web-site and online marketing efforts. When used as part of good business practices in a Marketing department, a company can improve its marketing investment priorities and as a result increase revenues. They can also reduce the chances that large amounts of web-site and online marketing money goes down the drain because nobody are paying attention to- and measuring the ROI.

Website ROI Report Example

Here is an example of a ROI Report for a website and related online marketing investments.

Return on Investment (ROI) Report Example for a Corporate Web-site

Return on Investment (ROI) Report Example for a Corporate Web-site

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Marketing executives, marketing managers, campaign managers, web-site managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Website ROI Reports

Progressive Marketing Departments sometimes use several different Website ROI Reports, along with website analytics, marketing campaign reports, marketing department profit & loss reports, marketing dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from Google Analytics as well as CRM and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Hubspot, Salesforce, Microsoft Dynamics 365 (CRM), Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite, and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Capital Expenditure Budget Report Example

What is a Capital Expenditure Budget Report?

Capital expense (“Capex”) reports for budgets are considered analysis tools and are often used by budget managers and CFOs to review how much their department heads plans to spend on asset purchases next year. Some of the key functionality in this type of budget analysis report is that it can be run for any company and budget version. It shows planned purchases by asset type and department. Furthermore it shows expected purchase month, quantity, and total amount. At the bottom of the report it summarizes the transactions up to the respective general ledger (GL) accounts and compares the budget to actual and forecast for the current year. You find an example of this type of budget analysis report below.

Purpose of Capex Budget Reports

Companies and organizations use Capital Expenditure Budget Reports to easily review and decide on proposed or approved asset purchase budgets. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its capital investment plans and cost control as well as reduce the chances that it over- or under spends on new assets.

Capital Expenditure Budget Report Example

Here is an example of a Capital Expenditures Budget Analysis Report that shows proposed asset purchases and costs for all departments.

Capital Expenditure Budget Report Example

Capital Expenditure Budget Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Budget analysis report?

The typical users of this type of budget analysis report are: CFOs, budget managers, and department heads.

Other Budget analysis reports Often Used in Conjunction with Capital Expenditure Budget Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Capital Expenditure Budget Reports, along with capex budget input forms, asset reports, depreciation reports, budget dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Credit Card Expense Report with Employee Comparison

What is a Credit Card Expenses by Employee and Type?

Credit card usage reports with employee comparison are considered control and analysis tools and are often used by accountants to determine credit card usage by expense category and to compare usage across employees. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it provides parameters where the accountant can choose date range and employees to be included when the report is executed. Expense categories are ranked from high to low and listed down the rows with a grand total at the bottom. Employees are dynamically listed across the columns. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Credit Card Expenses by Employee Reports

Companies and organizations use Credit Card Expenses by Employee Reports to easily analyze card usage in order to manage the company’s expenses. When used as part of good business practices in a Accounting department, a company can improve its cost control and credit card usage policies as well as reduce the chances that any abuse or fraud occurs.

Credit Card Expenses by Employee Report Example

Here is an example of a Credit Card Expense Report that compares charges across a list of employees and with ranking based on total expenses by type.

Credit Card Expense Report with Employee Comparison

Credit Card Expense Report with Employee Comparison

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Accountants, CFOs, auditors.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Credit Card Expenses by Employee Reports

Progressive Accounting Departments sometimes use several different Credit Card Expenses by Employee Reports, along with expense reports, Travel & Entertainment (T&E) dashboards, exception reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from credit card companies like American Express (Amex) and Visa as well as enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Credit Card Expense Analysis Report by Vendor

What is a Credit Card Expense Analysis Report by Vendor?

Vendor expense reports for corporate credit cards are considered control and analysis tools and are often used by accountants to review which vendors the company is paying with credit cards, how much spending is taking place and trends over time. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it is parameter-driven and the columns will display monthly detail for each period in the current and prior year. It also shows the variance in year-to-date (YTD) spending by vendor and category and the variance versus the prior year. The first row section shows expenses by category and the second section shows expenses grouped by vendor and ranked by YTD spend. The YTD columns can be expanded to see the monthly detail. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Vendor Expense Analysis for Corporate Credit Card Usage

Companies and organizations use Vendor Expense Analysis Reports for Corporate Credit Cards to easily track monthly and YTD spend per vendor. This analysis have multiple uses including to negotiate corporate deals with the company’s top recurring vendors. When used as part of good business practices in an accounting department, a company can improve its cost control and the bottom line. It can also reduce the chances that lack of credit card expense analysis leads to lost negotiation- or vendor consolidation opportunities.

Vendor Expense Analysis for Corporate Credit Card Usage Example

Here is an example of a Vendor Expense Analysis Report for corporate credit card transactions.

Credit Card Expense Analysis Report by Vendor

Credit Card Expense Analysis Report by Vendor

 

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Accountants, CFOs, auditors, analysts.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Vendor Expense Analysis for Corporate Credit Card Usage

Progressive accounting departments sometimes use several different Vendor Expense Analysis reports related to corporate credit card usage, along with purchasing reports, vendor dashboards, anomaly reports, exception reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from credit card vendors like American Express (AMEX) and Visa as well as enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Credit Card Expense Report Example by Category

What is a Credit Card Expenses by Category Report?

Credit card usage reports are considered control and analysis tools and are often used by accountants to manage expenses coming from corporate issued credit cards. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it uses imported credit card transactions to provide a user-friendly format to review monthly expenditures. The report groups individual transactions by employee, category and assigned GL account. Amounts are sub-totaled for the same groupings. The line item detail also include vendor, transaction description and date. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Credit Card Summary by Category Reports

Companies and organizations use Credit Card Summary by Category Reports to easily review monthly card usage by expense category. When used as part of good business practices in a accounting department, a company can improve its cost control and better analyze what type of expenses credit cards are being used for as well as reduce the chances that corporate usage policies are not being followed or that cards are being used in areas where other payment methods are preferred.

Credit Card Summary by Category Report Example

Here is an example of a Credit Card Report with expenses grouped by category.

Credit Card Expense Report Example by Category

Credit Card Expense Report Example by Category

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Accountants, Auditors.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Credit Card Summary by Category Reports

Progressive Accounting Departments sometimes use several different Credit Card Summary by Category Reports, along with Travel & Entertainment (T&E) reports, T&E dashboards, expense reports, anomaly reports, exception reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from credit card vendors or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Sales by Customer Report Example with Transaction Detail

What is a Sales by Customer Transaction Detail Report?

Customer sales reports with transaction detail are considered operational reports and are often used by sales managers and accountants to analyze detailed customer sales transactions. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it is parameter-driven and the user can run it for any date range and any group of customers. The charts on top of the report show quantity and amount per customer in relation to others. The transaction rows show items sold by order by customer. The columns include document ID, document date, customer name, product name, sales person name, quantity, rate and price. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Customer Sales Reports

Companies and organizations use professionally formatted Customer Sales Reports to make it easy for staff to view sales detail, in particular when they can be accessed as web reports or team members can receive them automatically by email e.g. once a week. When used as part of good business practices in a sales or accounting department, a company can improve its sales analysis and response time to inquiries. It can also reduce the chances that analysis and review of customer sales is mediocre because team members don’t have self-service access to reports.

Customer Sales Report Example

Here is an example of a Detailed Customer Sales Report with totals and graphical analysis.

Sales by Customer Report Example with Transaction Detail

Sales by Customer Report Example with Transaction Detail

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Accountants, Managers, Sales Teams.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Customer Sales Reports

Progressive sales or accounting Departments sometimes use several different Customer Sales Reports, along with product sales reports, sales dashboards, accounts receivable (AR) reports, open orders reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Customer 360 Degree Analysis Report Example

What is a Customer 360 Degree Analysis Report?

Customer 360 degree reports are considered one of the most important analysis tools in a company and are often used by customer-facing employees and managers to quickly get a complete picture of a specific customer without having to manually assemble data from different systems. Some of the key functionality in this type of dashboard report is that it combines data from the company’s systems that hold customer information. These typically include sales and receivables data from the ERP system, pipeline data from CRM and support data from the helpdesk system. The report is a single page, easy to read format that combines customer metrics with charts for easy analysis. The report is parameter driven and the user can run it for any customer and date range. You find an example of this type of dashboard report below.

Purpose of 360 Degree Customer Reports

Companies and organizations use 360 Degree Customer Reports to speed up decisions by providing employees and managers with a very quick and easy way to see everything going on with a customer. When used as part of good business practices in a customer-facing department, a company can improve its customer-related decisions as well as reduce the chances that revenues are lost because employees make decisions without a complete customer picture.

360 Degree Customer Report Example

Here is an example of a Customer360 report that combines data from multiple data sources.

Customer 360 Degree Analysis Report Example

Customer 360 Degree Analysis Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard report?

The typical users of this type of dashboard report are: Support teams, Sales teams, Managers.

Other Dashboard Reports Often Used in Conjunction with 360 Degree Customer Reports

Progressive customer-facing Departments sometimes use several different 360 Degree Customer Reports, along with sales reports, receivables reports, support reports, customer dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from helpdesk, CRM and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Microsoft Dynamics 365 (CRM), Salesforce, Hubspot, Zendesk, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Departmental Travel and Entertainment Analysis Report Example

What is a Travel and Entertainment Departmental Analysis Report?

Travel and entertainment (T&E) reports are considered expense analysis tools and are often used by controllers and accountants to manage and review departmental T&E costs. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it is parameter driven and is usually reviewed on a monthly basis. The columns shows Travel (expense) Type, Department and Amount. The rows show expense by category and department. When the user clicks on a category such as “Dinner”, the row expands and all departments are shown with their individual expense amounts. The bottom of the report displays a chart that ranks total actual expenses by category. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of T&E Departmental Expense Analysis Reports

Companies and organizations use T&E Departmental Expense Analysis Reports to easily review T&E expenses both at a high level and with the option to drill down to detail by individual department. When used as part of good business practices in an accounting department, a company can improve its cost control and related policies as well as reduce the chances that there is overspending or abuse in certain areas.

T&E Departmental Expense Analysis Report Example

Here is an example of Travel & Entertainment Report by Category and Department.

 Departmental Travel and Entertainment Analysis Report Example

Departmental Travel and Entertainment Analysis Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Controllers and Accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with T&E Departmental Expense Analysis Reports

Progressive Accounting Departments sometimes use several different T&E Departmental Expense Analysis Reports, along with T&E dashboards, departmental and corporate profit & loss reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Travel and Entertainment Expense Analysis Report Example

What is a Travel and Entertainment Expense Analysis Report?

Travel and entertainment (T&E) reports are considered expense analysis tools and are often used by controllers and accountants to manage and review T&E costs. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it is parameter driven and it is usually reviewed on a monthly basis. The columns shows Department, Employee, Travel (expense) Type and Amount. The rows shows expense by category and are grouped by employee and department. The bottom of the report displays a chart that compares the total actual departmental T&E expense versus the budget. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of T&E Expense Analysis Reports

Companies and organizations use T&E Expense Analysis Reports to easily review T&E expenses both at a high level and with the option to drill down to granular detail by employee. When used as part of good business practices in an accounting department, a company can improve its cost control and bottom line as well as reduce the chances of budget overruns and abuse.

T&E Expense Analysis Report Example

Here is an example of Travel & Entertainment Report by Employee and Department.

Travel and Entertainment Expense Analysis Report Example

Travel and Entertainment Expense Analysis Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Controllers and Accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with T&E Expense Analysis Reports

Progressive Accounting Departments sometimes use several different T&E Expense Analysis Reports, along with T&E dashboards, departmental and corporate profit & loss reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples