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Example of a Monthly Support and Maintenance Sales for a Technology Company

What is a Monthly Support and Maintenance Sales Report?

Monthly support and maintenance sales reports are considered recurring revenue analysis tools and are used by CFOs, sales and support managers to analyze support subscription and maintenance revenues for any given period. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it displays KPIs and charts as a summary on top of the report with detailed transactions and aggregate totals at the bottom. KPIs include: Subscribed customers for maintenance, renewal customers for maintenance, subscribed customers for support services, and renewal customers for support services, as well as the total monthly quantity and sales amount. The detailed section of the report shows quantity and sales amount by product, by organization (e.g. reseller or customer) and region. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Support Subscription and Maintenance Sales Reports

Technology companies use Support Subscription and Maintenance Sales Reports to give managers a clear picture of revenue streams from new and renewal sales for support and maintenance. When used as part of good business practices in Accounting and Support departments, a company can improve its revenues and customer retention strategies, and it can reduce the chances that churn unexpectedly grows because managers lacks information.

Example of a Support Subscription and Maintenance Sales Report

Here is an example of a Monthly Support and Maintenance Sales Report with KPIs and transactional details.

Example of a Monthly Support and Maintenance Sales for a Technology Company

Example of a Monthly Support and Maintenance Sales for a Technology Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: CFOs, analysts, accountants, support managers, sales managers, subscription renewal managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Support Subscription  and Maintenance Sales Reports

Progressive Accounting and Support departments sometimes use several different Support Subscription  and Maintenance Sales Reports, along with ARR and MRR reports, churn reports, detailed transactional support and maintenance reports, subscription renewal reports, subscription revenue dashboards, sales forecast and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Monthly Subscription Sales by Category Report for a Technology Company

What is a Monthly Subscription Sales Report?

Monthly subscription sales reports are considered recurring revenue analysis tools and are used by CFOs and sales managers to analyze subscription revenues for any given period. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it presents KPIs and charts as a summary on top of the report with detailed transactions at the bottom. KPIs include: Number of new subscriptions, number of renewals and number of renewal customers, as well as the total monthly sales amount. The detailed section of the report shows quantity and sales amount by product, by organization (e.g. reseller or customer) and region. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Subscription Sales Reports

Technology companies use Subscription Sales Reports to get a summary as well as a detailed picture of subscription business taking place in any given month. When used as part of good business practices in Accounting and Sales departments, a company can improve its sales strategies and as a result increase revenues, and it can reduce the chances of accounting mistakes and lack of clarity in revenue streams from new sales and renewals.

Example of a Subscription Sales Report

Here is an example of a Monthly Subscription Sales Report with KPIs and transactional details.

Example of a Monthly Subscription Sales by Category Report for a Technology Company

Example of a Monthly Subscription Sales by Category Report for a Technology Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: CFOs, analysts, accountants, sales managers, subscription renewal managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Subscription Sales Reports

Progressive Accounting and Sales departments sometimes use several different Subscription Sales Reports, along with ARR and MRR reports, churn reports, subscription renewal reports, subscription revenue dashboards, sales forecast and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

This example shows a Monthly Renewal Rate Report for a technology company, which helps managers improve decisions related to subscription renewal strategies. 100s of additional templates are available through the link below.

What is a Monthly Renewal Rate Report?

Monthly renewal reports are considered subscription revenue analysis and prediction tools and are used by CFOs and analysts to monitor customer renewal rates by product. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it lists all products (SKUs/Items) down the rows and months across the columns. Trend charts display between each product group comparing the items (SKUs) within that category. The metrics are shown as percent renewal rate. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Renewal Rate Trend Reports

Technology companies use Renewal Rate Trend Reports to keep a close eye on their customers’ subscription renewals and its effect on recurring revenues. When used as part of good business practices in Accounting departments, a company can improve its revenues and strategies related to pricing and renewal offers, and it can reduce the chances that managers don’t quickly discover customer churn issues at the product level.

Example of a Renewal Rate Trend Report

Here is an example of a Monthly Subscription Renewal Report with trend chart and renewal rates for products and services.

This example shows a Monthly Renewal Rate Report for a technology company, which helps managers improve decisions related to subscription renewal strategies. 100s of additional templates are available through the link below.

This example shows a Monthly Renewal Rate Report for a technology company, which helps managers improve decisions related to subscription renewal strategies. 100s of additional templates are available through the link below.

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: CFOs, analysts, accountants, subscription renewal managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Renewal Rate Trend Reports

Progressive Accounting departments sometimes use several different Renewal Rate Trend Reports, along with ARR and MRR reports, churn reports, subscription revenue dashboards, sales forecast and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Monthly Sales Trend Report for a Technology Company

What is a Monthly Sales Trend Report?

Monthly sales reports are considered trend analysis tools and are used by sales managers and executives to track sales by channel by month. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it automatically displays sales for each month up to the current period. The rows show sales by channel (direct, distributor, reseller) with roll-ups and totals by region. On the right side the report compares the year-to-date (YTD) sales against last year with a percent variance and color highlighting of positive and negative variances. The chart on the top of the report shows aggregate monthly sales. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Monthly Sales Trend Reports

Technology companies use Monthly Sales Trend Reports to monitor trends and exceptions in sales as well as to compare performance across their channels. When used as part of good business practices in Sales departments, a company can improve its revenues by optimizing tactical sales decisions, and it can reduce the chances that weak performance in any area goes undetected.

Example of a Monthly Sales Trend Report

Here is an example of a Monthly Sales Trend Report with variance analysis and metrics by channel.

Example of a Monthly Sales Trend Report for a Technology Company

Example of a Monthly Sales Trend Report for a Technology Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Budget Managers, Revenue Officers, Sales Executives, Regional Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Monthly Sales Trend Reports

Progressive Sales departments sometimes use several different Monthly Sales Trend Reports, along with detailed sales reports, sales dashboards, budget models, sales forecasts, open and paid sales orders reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Monthly Product Sales Report for a Technology Company

What is a Monthly Product Sales Report?

Monthly product sales reports are considered sales analytics tools and are used by sales and product managers to monitor detailed and summarized sales quantities and amounts. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it displays January through December across the columns and shows both quantity and amount for each month. The rows shows each product at the most detailed level and then roll them up to locations (companies) and regions. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Monthly Product Sales Reports

Technology companies use Monthly Product Sales Reports to help managers and functional staff look at trends and detailed item sales across the entire year. When used as part of good business practices in Sales departments, a company can improve its sales analysis and related tactical decisions, and it can reduce the chances that decision-making is slowed down because managers lack a global sales view with detailed drill down.

Example of a Monthly Product Sales Report

Here is an example of a Monthly Product Sales Report with detailed as well as roll-up information for quantities and revenues.

Example of a Monthly Product Sales Report for a Technology Company

Example of a Monthly Product Sales Report for a Technology Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Budget Managers, Revenue Officers, Sales Executives, Regional Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Monthly Product Sales Reports

Progressive Sales departments sometimes use several different Monthly Product Sales Reports, along with detailed sales reports, sales dashboards, budget models, sales forecasts, open and paid sales orders reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of an Actual and Estimated Consulting Hours Report for a Technology Company

What is an Actual and Estimated Consulting Hours Report?

Professional Services reports showing actual and estimated hours are considered operational analysis and planning tools and are used by consulting managers to track consultant hours delivered per project. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it is parameter driven and can be run for any month, entity and project(s). It compares the actual hours each consultant delivered by project versus the estimated hours and displays the variance amount and percent with exception highlighting. The rows can be expanded and collapsed and they group projects by consultant and region/entity. The chart compares the grand total hours delivered for the chosen time period versus the estimated hours. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Actual and Estimated Hours Reports

Technology companies use Actual and Estimated Hours Reports to easily monitor each of the organization’s locations and their ability to achieve or exceed the professional service hours they targeted. When used as part of good business practices in Project Management departments, a company can improve its estimate accuracy and therefore increase its ability to drive revenues with optimal human resource planning, and it can reduce the chances that managers react slowly, or not at all-, to trends and outliers.

Example of an Actual and Estimated Hours Report

Here is an example of an actual and estimated hours per consultant report with roll-up by project and region.

Example of an Actual and Estimated Consulting Hours Report for a Technology Company

Example of an Actual and Estimated Consulting Hours Report for a Technology Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Project Managers, Project Management Offices (PMO), Directors of Services, Consulting Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Actual and Estimated Hours Reports

Progressive Executive and Project Management departments sometimes use several different Actual and Estimated Hours Reports, along with detailed project reports, utilization reports, project dashboards, billing reports, project budgets and forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Project Status Overview Report

What is a Project Status Overview Report?

Project overview reports are considered operational analysis tools and are used by professional service executives and consulting managers to get a clear picture of the stages of their projects’ life cycle and status ratios compared to the prior year. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it provides a year-over-year comparison of four metrics, including charts: 1) Projects on time, 2) New projects, 3) Cancelled projects, and 4) Completed projects. All these metrics are shown as ratios across companies/locations grouped by category and region. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Project Status Overview Reports

Technology companies use Project Status Overview Reports to analyze performance by stage and then compare it to the same metrics for the prior year to look for important variances. When used as part of good business practices in Project Management departments, a company can improve its professional services strategies and related revenues, and it can reduce the chances that managers miss out on important trends.

Example of a Project Status Overview Report

Here is an example of a Project Status Summary Report with ratios and comparisons to prior year.

Example of a Project Status Overview Report

Example of a Project Status Overview Report

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Project Management Offices (PMO), Directors of Services, Consulting Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Project Status Overview Reports

Progressive Project Management departments sometimes use several different Project Status Overview Reports, along with detailed project reports, project dashboards, billing reports, project budgets and forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Helpdesk Trend Report for a Technology Company

What is a Helpdesk Support Trend Report?

Support type trend reports are considered helpdesk analysis tools and are used by support managers to review monthly metrics in case volume. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it dynamically displays monthly case statistics up to the current period. The report shows a trend chart on the top, and then summary statistics for the following support types: 1) Remote support, 2) Technical support, and 3) Telephone support. The detailed rows show the same call type metrics but by helpdesk location. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Support Type Trend Reports

Technology companies use Support Type Trend Reports to easily analyze monthly trends in support case volume. When used as part of good business practices in helpdesk departments, a company can improve its support processes and automation strategies, and it can reduce the chances that managers don’t have the right information they need for resource planning and cost control.

Example of a Support Type Trend Report

Here is an example of a Support Type Trend Report with monthly statistical metrics.

Example of a Helpdesk Trend Report for a Technology Company

Example of a Helpdesk Trend Report for a Technology Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Helpdesk managers, COOs, support team leads.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Support Type Trend Reports

Progressive helpdesk departments sometimes use several different Support Type Trend Reports, along with helpdesk dashboards, support ticket reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from helpdesk systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Helpdesk Service Level Report for a Technology Company

What is a Helpdesk Service Level Report?

Service level reports are considered operational analysis tools and are used by helpdesk managers and COOs to analyze aggregate and detailed call metrics. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it shows total KPIs as well as detailed metrics down to the agent, location and company. Response times are automatically color codes in red, yellow and green. The KPIs include: Total incoming calls, Total calls answered within 30 seconds, Total calls answered after 30 seconds, % calls answered in 30 seconds.  The detailed metrics cover the same figures as the KPIs but at a granular level and with sub-totals. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Service Level Reports

Technology companies use Service Level Reports to give helpdesk managers an easy way to monitor the performance of their teams. When used as part of good business practices in helpdesk departments, a company can improve its helpdesk processes and related customer satisfaction, and it can reduce the chances that outliers and trends are missed in monthly analysis.

Example of a Service Level Report

Here is an example of a Helpdesk Call Performance Report for a technology company.

Example of a Helpdesk Service Level Report for a Technology Company

Example of a Helpdesk Service Level Report for a Technology Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Helpdesk managers, COOs, support team leads.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Service Level Reports

Progressive helpdesk departments sometimes use several different Service Level Reports, along with helpdesk dashboards, support ticket reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from support systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Project Performance Dashboard for Technology Companies

What is a Project Performance Dashboard?

Project Dashboards are considered professional services analysis tools and are used by Executives and Consulting Leaders to review and benchmark performance across consulting teams and projects. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides KPI analysis from five different perspectives. These include: 1) Percent of projects on budget with comparison to prior year, 2) Percent of projects on time with prior year comparison, 3) Percent of projects cancelled versus prior year, 4) Percent of projects completed in the current year versus prior year, and 5) Table with percent-based metrics and year over year comparison and variances by customer and consulting team, including: Projects on budget, Projects on time, Projects cancelled, and Projects completed. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Project Analysis Dashboards

Tech companies use Project Analysis Dashboards to look for trends, opportunities and issues in their professional services business. When used as part of good business practices in a Project Management Office (PMO) and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, an organization can improve its services revenues and strategic planning, and it can reduce the chances that managers miss important signals in their consulting metrics with resulting lack of action.

Example of a Project Analysis Dashboard

Here is an example of a Project Performance Dashboard with year-over-year comparisons.

Example of a Project Performance Dashboard for Technology Companies

Example of a Project Performance Dashboard for Technology Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, Consulting Leaders, Project Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Project Analysis Dashboards

Progressive Project Management Office (PMO) and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Project Analysis Dashboards, along with detailed utilization reports, detailed project reports, billing reports, consulting dashboards, PMO dashboards, financial reports, financial KPI dashboards, project forecasting models, annual consulting budgets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples