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Example of a Clinical Trials Analysis Report for Pharmaceutical Companies

What is a Clinical Trials Analysis Report?

Clinical Trials Reports are considered operational monitoring tools and are used by product and trial managers to analyze expenses and statistical KPIs related to their drug trial programs. Some of the main functionality in this type of graphical report is that it offers comparative analysis for four different metrics, including: 1) Target versus actual cost by drug trial, 2) Target versus actual hours by drug trial, 3) Target versus actual participants by drug trial, and 4) Target versus actual cost by status. Below the charts (not visible in the image) is a report section with figures. You find an example of this type of graphical report below.

Purpose of Clinical Trials Analysis Reports

Pharmaceutical companies use Clinical Trials Analysis Reports to give managers an easy and graphical way to keep an eye on essential product trial metrics. When used as part of good business practices in Product and Clinical Trials departments, a company can improve its program planning, and it can reduce the chances that there are cost overruns or issues with trial participation.

Example of a Clinical Trials Analysis Report

Here is an example of a Clinical Trials Analysis Report with cost, hours and participant analysis.

Example of a Clinical Trials Analysis Report for Pharmaceutical Companies

Example of a Clinical Trials Analysis Report for Pharmaceutical Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Graphical report?

The typical users of this type of graphical report are: Program managers, R&D managers, controllers, analysts, executives.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Clinical Trials Analysis Reports

Progressive Product and Clinical Trials departments sometimes use several different Clinical Trials Analysis Reports, along with clinical trial KPI dashboards, clinical trial reports, profit & loss reports, budget models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from clinical trial software and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of an Agent Sales Ranking Dashboard for Real Estate Companies

What is a Real Estate Agent Sales Ranking Dashboard?

Agent sales ranking dashboards are considered performance benchmarking tools and are used by executives and sales leaders to closely track how each real estate agent is performing. Some of the main functionality in this type of graphical report is that it is parameter driven and displays sales metrics both graphically and as figures (below the chart section seen in the image below). The first chart shows real estate agents ranked by sales amount for the period and with comparison of actual and budget. The second chart shows agents ranked by unit sales. You find an example of this type of graphical report below.

Purpose of a Real Estate Agent Sales Ranking Dashboards

Real Estate companies use Agent Sales Ranking Dashboards to give leaders an easy way to see high-, mid- and low sales performers in real time. When used as part of good business practices in Sales and Financial Planning and Analysis (FP&A) departments, a company can improve its agent strategies and increase revenues, and it can reduce the chances that low performers are left without support or other tactical action.

Example of a Real Estate Agent Sales Ranking Dashboard

Here is an example of a Real Estate Agent Sales Ranking Dashboard with actual to budget variances and agent ranking.

Example of an Agent Sales Ranking Dashboard for Real Estate Companies

Example of an Agent Sales Ranking Dashboard for Real Estate Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Graphical report?

The typical users of this type of graphical report are: Sales Executives, CFOs, regional sales managers, budget managers and agents.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Agent Sales Ranking Dashboards

Progressive Sales and Financial Planning and Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Agent Sales Ranking Dashboards, along with detailed sales reports, KPI dashboards, financial statements, annual budget models, corporate forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Sales Forecast Model for Real Estate Companies

What is a Real Estate Sales Forecast Model?

Sales Forecast Models are considered planning tools and are used by budgeting managers to collect sales drivers that generate forecasts. Some of the main functionality in this type of input form is that it uses drivers to automatically calculate the forecast (or budget) in the months seen across the columns. These driver inputs include: Available units, Property average area, Average price per square meter (or square foot), Monthly average speed (unit sales), and Beginning month (of sales). In the example below the form uses a configuration that lists real estate projects down the rows. You find an example of this type of input form below.

Purpose of Real Estate Sales Forecast Models

Real Estate companies use Sales Forecast Models to enable users to quickly and securely enter and update sales figures so the company has the best possible unit inventory and revenue estimate. When used as part of good business practices in Sales and Financial Planning and Analysis (FP&A) departments, a company can improve its strategies related to financing and real estate projects, and it can reduce the chances that managers makes uninformed decisions that ultimately can effect revenues and profitability.

Example of a Real Estate Sales Forecast Model

Here is an example of a Sales Forecast Input Form by project.

Example of a Sales Forecast Model for Real Estate Companies

Example of a Sales Forecast Model for Real Estate Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Input form?

The typical users of this type of input form are: CFOs, project planners, regional sales managers, budget managers and agents.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Real Estate Sales Forecast Models

Progressive Sales and Financial Planning and Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Real Estate Sales Forecast Models, along with sales reports, sales dashboards, real estate inventory reports, financial statements, annual budget models, corporate forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Grant Dashboard Example for a Nonprofit Organization

What is a Grant Dashboard for a Nonprofit Organization?

Grant dashboards are considered essential analysis tools and are used by grant managers and executives to track trends and variances related to their grant activities. Some of the key functionality in this type of visual report is that it provides eight charts as a well as a report section to analyze various grant metrics. The dashboard gives quick insight into revenue by grant, monthly trend in granted versus encumbered amounts, top 5 awarded grants, number of grant requests by staff member, requested/granted/encumbered amounts, encumbered amounts by program by month, requested versus declined grants, and expenditures by program You find an example of this type of visual report below.

Purpose of Grant Dashboards

Nonprofits and associations use Grant Dashboards to give managers an easy, self-service interface to monitor grant metrics. When used as part of good business practices in a Grant department, an organization can improve its grant-related strategies and revenues as well as reduce the chances that managers miss important trends and variances.

Grant Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Grant Dashboard with key trends and statistics.

Grant Dashboard Example for a Nonprofit Organization

Grant Dashboard Example for a Nonprofit Organization

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Visual report?

The typical users of this type of visual report are: Grant managers and executives.

Other Visual reports Often Used in Conjunction with Grant Dashboards

Progressive grant departments sometimes use several different Grant Dashboards, along with grant budgets, grant reports, encumbrance reports, program reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from dedicated grant management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Membership Dashboard Example for a Nonprofit Organization

What is a Membership Dashboard for a Nonprofit Organization?

Membership dashboards are considered monitoring and analysis tools and are used by executives and membership managers to track trends and variances in their membership base. Some of the key functionality in this type of visual report is that it is parameter driven and can be run for any period. It has six KPI charts and a report section at the bottom. The charts provide visual analysis of actual versus target membership, members at risk per region, trends in member dues, trends in new members versus dropped members, member count per region, and new member adds versus target. You find an example of this type of visual report below.

Purpose of Membership Dashboards

Nonprofits and associations use Membership Dashboards to provides managers with an easy, self-service way to monitor membership trends and variances. When used as part of good business practices in a Membership department, an organization can improve its member-related strategies and speed up decision-making as well as reduce the chances that important trends or anomalies go undetected for weeks or months.

Membership Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a modern Membership Dashboard for associations and other nonprofit organizations.

Membership Dashboard Example for a Nonprofit Organization

Membership Dashboard Example for a Nonprofit Organization

 

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Visual report?

The typical users of this type of visual report are: Membership managers and executives.

Other Visual reports Often Used in Conjunction with Membership Dashboards

Progressive membership departments sometimes use several different Membership Dashboards, along with annual budget models, membership reports, dues and subscription reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from dedicated membership management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Executive Dashboard Example for a Nonprofit Organization

What is an Executive Dashboard for a Nonprofit Organization?

Executive dashboards are considered monitoring tools and are used by executives and senior management to have a single web-based report that shows the metrics that matter the most to them. Some of the key functionality in this type of visual report is that it it provides a mix of graphical analysis as well as a report (partially visible at the bottom of the screenshot below). The user can refresh the report and choose filters for department and time period to see the data they are looking for. The two charts on the left compare actual to budget for the top revenues and expense categories, while the two charts in the middle show the monthly trend for the same metrics. The final two charts show membership count by region and grant amounts by program. You find an example of this type of visual report below.

Purpose of Nonprofit Executive Dashboards

Nonprofits and associations use Executive Dashboards to give leaders an easy, self-service way to analyze the organization’s KPIs. When prepared as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department and actively used by executives, an organization can improve its strategies and reaction time as well as reduce the chances that leaders miss important trends and variances.

Nonprofit Executive Dashboard Example

Here is an example of an Executive Dashboard for nonprofit organizations.

Executive Dashboard Example for a Nonprofit Organization

Executive Dashboard Example for a Nonprofit Organization

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Visual report?

The typical users of this type of visual report are: Executives and senior managers.

Other Visual reports Often Used in Conjunction with Nonprofit Executive Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Nonprofit Executive Dashboards, along with financial statements, budget dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from dedicated membership management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Revenue Dashboard Example for a Nonprofit Organization

What is a Revenue Dashboard for a Nonprofit Organization?

Revenue dashboards are considered important analysis tools and are used by for executives and revenue managers to track trends and variances in their sources of funding. Some of the key functionality in this type of visual report is that it it provides a mix of graphical analysis as well as a report (partially visible at the bottom of the screenshot below). The user can choose filters for department and time period to see the data they are looking for. The report covers revenues from grants, products & services and, when applicable, membership dues. You find an example of this type of visual report below.

Purpose of Nonprofit Revenue Dashboards

Nonprofits and associations use Revenue Dashboards to easily analyze their revenue performance versus budgets and targets. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, an organization can improve its strategies and reaction time to changing market conditions as well as reduce the chances that managers miss important trends and variances.

Nonprofit Revenue Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Nonprofit Revenue Dashboard with a report section and dynamic parameters.

Revenue Dashboard Example for a Nonprofit Organization

Revenue Dashboard Example for a Nonprofit Organization

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Visual report?

The typical users of this type of visual report are: Executives, financial managers and revenue managers.

Other Visual reports Often Used in Conjunction with Nonprofit Revenue Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Nonprofit Revenue Dashboards, along with financial statements, budget models, grants dashboards, membership dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from dedicated membership management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Membership Analysis Report Example

What is a Membership Analysis Report?

Membership reports are considered analysis tools and are used by membership managers to monitor statistical and financial member metrics. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it can be run for any period and any organizational unit. The core of the report shows membership metrics by state and region with sub-totals and totals. The columns include Number of Members, Actual Dues, Budgeted Dues, Budget Variance, # of New Members, New Member Target, Variance and Drops. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Membership Analysis Reports

Nonprofits and associations use Membership Analysis Reports to monitor the organization’s ability to meet its membership budgets and goals. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Membership department, an organization can improve its revenues and membership numbers as well as reduce the chances that attrition or other issues limits successful growth.

Membership Analysis Report Example

Here is an example of a Membership Report that compares financial and statistical metrics across geographic regions.

Membership Analysis Report Example

Membership Analysis Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Membership managers, executives.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Membership Analysis Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Membership departments sometimes use several different Membership Analysis Reports, along with membership dashboards, financial statements, budget models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from dedicated membership management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Multi-year Strategic Planning Model for Nonprofits Example

What is a Multi-year Strategic Planning Model for Nonprofits?

Strategic Planning models are considered planning tools and are often used by budget managers and executives to capture financial metrics to plan the funding of  programs and initiatives for the coming years. Key functionality in this type of template displays history and current year forecast as a guideline, and then provides input columns for the next eight years. The initiatives are grouped by program in the rows. You will find an example of this type of template below.

Purpose of Long Term Strategic Planning Models

Nonprofit organizations use Long Term Strategic Planning Models to have a single web-based template where the essential financial estimates for program funding can be captured. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a nonprofit can improve its strategic planning and analysis capabilities, as well as, reduce the chances that managers lack visibility and easy access to long term targets.

Long Term Strategic Planning Model Example

Here is an example of Multi-year Strategic Planning Form for Nonprofit Organizations.

Multi-year Strategic Planning Model for Nonprofits Example

Multi-year Strategic Planning Model for Nonprofits Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here.

Who Uses This Type of Template?

The typical users of this type of template are: Budget managers, program managers and executives.

Other Templates Often Used in Conjunction with Long Term Strategic Planning Models

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Long Term Strategic Planning Models, along with annual budget models, reports, dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Strategy and Goals Input Form

What is a Strategy and Goals Input Form?

Strategy and goals input forms are considered management tools and are used by executives to capture the company’s goals for strategic key performance indicators (KPIs). Some key functionality in this type of strategic input template will allow the company to capture metrics in a database for their most important goals. Later, it is then easy to pull these metrics into budgets, financial reports and dashboards. You will find an example of this type of strategic input template below.

Purpose of Strategy and Goals Templates

Companies and organizations use Strategy and Goals Templates to provide managers with continuous visibility to strategic metrics to help guide their tactics and decision-making. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Department, a company can improve its strategic alignment as well as reduce the risk that managers lose focus on the big picture.

Strategy and Goals Template Example

Here is an example of a strategic goals input form for multiple future years and for both financial and statistical metrics.

Strategy and Goals Input Form

Strategy and Goals Input Form

You can find 100’s of additional examples here.

Who Uses This Type of Strategic Input Template?

The typical users of this type of strategic input template are: The Board of Directors and Executives.

Other Strategic Input Templates Often Used in Conjunction with Strategy and Goals Templates

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments use several different Strategy and Goals Templates, along with corporate planning presentations and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Technology Solutions and More Examples