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Example of a Merchandise Sales Variance Report for Professional Sports Teams

What is a Merchandise Sales Variance Report?

Merchandise Sales Variance Reports are considered product sales analysis tools and are used by sales and merchandise managers to monitor variances in sales compared to the same month in the prior year. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it shows columns with sales and percent variance for the current month compared to the same period in the prior year. The rows show different product categories grouped and sub-totaled by clothing and non-clothing items. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Product Sales Reports

Sports organizations use Product Sales Reports to easily analyze the sales performance of different merchandise items. When used as part of good business practices in Sales and FP&A departments, an organization can improve its product strategies and increase revenues, and it can reduce the chances that excessive inventory builds up (or the opposite) due to poor visibility into product sales trends.

Example of a Product Sales Report

Here is an example of a Merchandise Sales Report with monthly variance analysis by product group.

Example of a Merchandise Sales Variance Report for Professional Sports Teams

Example of a Merchandise Sales Variance Report for Professional Sports Teams

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: product managers, merchandise managers, buyers, sales managers, store managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Product Sales Reports

Progressive Sales and FP&A departments sometimes use several different Product Sales Reports, along with detailed product sales reports, sales forecasts, sales by store reports, profit & loss reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Merchandise Sales Dashboard for Professional Sports Teams

What is a Merchandise Sales Dashboard?

Merchandise Sales Dashboards are considered product sales analysis tools and are used by sales and merchandise managers to always have a clear picture of which items drive the most sales. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it delivers visualization for key sales metrics, including item comparisons and monthly trends. The charts show items sold by amount and by quantity, popularity of different payment methods, monthly trend in total merchandise sales, revenue share by product class, and revenue share by item type. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Merchandise Sales Dashboards

Sports organizations use Merchandise Sales Dashboards to easily analyze the sales performance of different products. When used as part of good business practices in Sales and FP&A departments, an organization can improve its product strategies and increase revenues, and it can reduce the chances that excessive inventory builds up (or the opposite) due to poor visibility into product sales trends.

Example of a Merchandise Sales Dashboard

Here is an example of a Merchandise Sales Dashboard with key product sales comparisons and trend analysis.

Example of a Merchandise Sales Dashboard for Professional Sports Teams

Example of a Merchandise Sales Dashboard for Professional Sports Teams

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: product managers, merchandise managers, buyers, sales managers, store managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Merchandise Sales Dashboards

Progressive Sales and FP&A departments sometimes use several different Merchandise Sales Dashboards, along with detailed product sales reports, sales forecasts, sales by store reports, profit & loss reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Revenue and Contribution Margin per Square Foot Dashboard for Retail Companies

What is a Revenue and Contribution Margin per Square Foot Dashboard?

Revenue and Margin per Square Foot Dashboards are considered retail area analysis tools and are used by financial analysts, regional and store managers to analyze KPIs related to stores and retail space. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides analysis of revenue and contribution margin from three different perspectives as well as with three KPI indicators: 1) Report matrix with total revenue, sales area, average contribution margin per square foot, average revenue per square foot, 2) Map with performance-based color coding per region where stores are located, 3) Square feet of sales area and revenue per square foot by store. The three KPIs show: Total revenue per square foot, Total average margin per square foot, and Sales area measured in square feet. The parameter slider in the top left corner enables the user to see all the dashboard values for any given date range. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Revenue and Contribution Margin per Square Foot Dashboards

Retail organizations use Revenue and Contribution Margin per Square Foot Dashboards to make is easy to analyze revenue and margins as it relates to retail space. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and product/sales departments, an organization can improve and speed up its store space strategies and related revenues, and it can reduce the chances of poor performing retail configurations.

Example of a Revenue and Contribution Margin per Square Foot Dashboard

Here is an example of a Revenue and Contribution Margin by Square Foot Dashboard with store benchmarking.

Example of a Revenue and Contribution Margin per Square Foot Dashboard for Retail Companies

Example of a Revenue and Contribution Margin per Square Foot Dashboard for Retail Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: CFOs, analysts, regional managers, store managers, store designers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Revenue and Contribution Margin per Square Foot Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Revenue and Contribution Margin Dashboards, along with financial dashboards, consolidated and store-level profit & loss reports, sales reports, sales forecast, annual budgets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Sales Mix Variance Dashboard for Retail Companies

What is a Sales Mix Variance Dashboard?

Sales Mix Variance Dashboards are considered sales analysis tools and are used by product and regional managers to analyze sales mix across regions, stores, product groups and products. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it shows variances in sales mix across six different perspectives: 1) Sales mix variance by region, city and store, 2) Sales mix variance by product group and product, 3) Sales mix variance by store (ranked chart based on variance), 4) Sales mix variance by product (ranked chart based on variance), 5) Sales mix variance monthly trend, and 6) Product list with sales mix variance amount.

The definition of sales mix variance used here is: The variance from the budgeted product sales mix and its impact on the contribution margin. The formula used for this was: Sales Mix Variance = (Actual quantity sold per product – Budgeted quantity sold per product) * Budgeted contribution margin per product.

You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Sales Mix Variance Dashboards

Retail organizations use Sales Mix Variance Dashboards to make it easy for managers to see the financial impact of product sales quantity variances in terms of actual versus budgeted sales. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and product departments, an organization can improve and speed up its product strategies and increase its sales revenues, and it can reduce the chances that low performers are not getting timely attention.

Sales Mix Variance Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Sales Mix Variance Dashboard with analysis by region, store, product group and product.

Example of a Sales Mix Variance Dashboard for Retail Companies

Example of a Sales Mix Variance Dashboard for Retail CompaniesYou can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: CFOs, analysts, regional managers, store managers, ecommerce managers, price managers, product managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Sales Mix Variance Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Sales Mix Variance Dashboards, along with financial dashboards, profit & loss reports, sales reports, price and cost reports, sales forecast, annual budgets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Contribution Margin Dashboard for Retail Companies

What is a Contribution Margin Dashboard for Retail Companies?

Product and Store Contribution Margin Dashboards are considered financial analysis tools and are used by product and regional managers to monitor the profitability of items and geographic areas. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it presents margins in amounts and percent for both stores/regions and products. The dashboard provides five key components: 1) A matrix showing contribution margin figures per seller (regions with drill down to store), 2) Contribution margin per product group with drill down to products, 3) Contribution margin monthly trend in USD/amount, 4) Contribution margin monthly trend in percent, and 5) KPIs showing total contribution margin as an amount and as a percent.. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Contribution Margin Dashboards

Retail organizations use Contribution Margin Dashboards to enable managers to go beyond sales figures to look at the true gross profit that a store or a product contributes. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and product/sales departments, an organization can improve and speed up its sales and cost strategies and related profitability, and it can reduce the chances that low performers are not getting timely attention.

Contribution Margin Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Retail Contribution Margin Dashboard with region, store and product sales and margins.

Example of a Contribution Margin Dashboard for Retail Companies

Example of a Contribution Margin Dashboard for Retail Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: CFOs, analysts, regional managers, store managers, ecommerce managers, price managers, product managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Contribution Margin Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Contribution Margin Dashboards, along with financial dashboards, profit & loss reports, sales reports, price and cost reports, sales forecast, annual budgets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Sales Dashboard for Retail Companies with Volume and Price by Region and Product

What is a Sales Dashboard with Volume and Price by Region and Product?

Sales Dashboards with store and product detail are considered sales analysis tools and are used by regional managers and product managers to analyze the main reasons store/region and item sales are above or below budget. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it shows how much of a budget variance comes from price factors versus quantity sold. The dashboard provides four perspectives: 1) A matrix with actual, budget revenue and it shows how much of the variance comes from volume versus price. Note that the user can drill down on the ‘+” sign to store and then to product group and product, 2) Trend chart with volume and price variance per month, 3) KPIs for price variance, volume variance and total variance, and 4) Total variance trend with price and volume in monthly stacked column bars. Using the parameter slider in the top left corner, the user can quickly expand or narrow the from-to date ranges in the analysis. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Store and Product Sales Variance Dashboards

Retail organizations use Store and Product Sales Variance Dashboards to give managers deep insight into sales variances versus budgets and actual prior year. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and product/sales departments, an organization can improve and speed up its regional, store and product strategies and increase revenues, and it can reduce the chances that low performing areas are not getting timely attention.

Store and Product Sales Variance Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Retail Sales Dashboard with regional, store and product drill-down.

Sales Dashboard for Retail Companies with Volume and Price by Region and Product

Sales Dashboard for Retail Companies with Volume and Price by Region and Product

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: CFOs, analysts, regional managers, store managers, ecommerce managers, price managers, product managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Store and Product Sales Variance Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Sales Variance Dashboards, along with financial dashboards, profit & loss reports, sales reports, sales forecast, annual budgets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Sales, Price and Volume Dashboard for Retail Companies

What is a Sales, Price and Volume Dashboard?

Sales Dashboards for retail companies are considered operational analysis tools and are used by sales and product managers analyze important retail metrics. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it gives the user KPIs that cover five different areas: 1) Price and volume variance, 2) Contribution margin, 3) Sales mix variance, 4) Sales per employee, and 5) sales per sales area. The bottom of the screen provides convenient definitions with details about calculations. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Sales Analysis Dashboards

Retail organizations use Sales Analysis Dashboards to give managers essential insight to metrics that drive revenues. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, an organization can improve and speed up its store sales and related strategies, and it can reduce the chances that low performing retail stores are not getting timely attention.

Sales Analysis Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Retail Sales Dashboard with price, volume, margin and other KPIs.

Example of a Sales, Price and Volume Dashboard for Retail Companies

Example of a Sales, Price and Volume Dashboard for Retail Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: CFOs, analysts, regional managers, store managers, product managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Sales Analysis Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Sales Analysis Dashboards, along with financial dashboards, profit & loss reports, sales reports, sales forecast, annual budgets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of an Automated Forecast for New Retail Store Opening

What is a Forecast for New Retail Store Opening?

New retail store forecasts and budgets are considered essential planning tools in retail corporations and are used by financial managers and analysts to forecast revenues and expenses for a planned store opening. Some of the main functionality in this type of forecast model is that it allows the user to select data from a similar existing store that automatically will be pulled into the model. The user also selects the start (store opening) month, which will zero out prior months that year. At this point the forecast can be saved and it is done, or you can adjust any of the figures and then save.. An example of this type of forecast model can be found below.

Purpose of Automated Forecasts for New Store Openings

Retail businesses use Automated Forecast Models to provide a very quick and easy way to create a forecast for a new store location based on actual or budget data from a similar size, existing store. It also makes it easy to perform what-if analysis and simulations related to potential store openings. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its decisions, timing and success with business expansions as well as reduce the chances that poor financial planning results in bigger, operational issues.

Automated Forecasts for New Store Opening – Example

Here is an example of an Automated Financial Forecast Model for a new store based on data from an existing store location.

Example of an Automated Forecast for New Retail Store Opening

Example of an Automated Forecast for New Retail Store Opening

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Forecast model?

The typical users of this type of forecast model are: Store planners, CFOs and analysts.

Other Forecast models Often Used in Conjunction with Automated Forecasts for New Store Openings

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Automated Profit & Loss forecasts, along with general sales forecasts and budgets, sales dashboards, KPI dashboards, consolidation reports, balance sheets and cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Sales Trend by Product Class Report for a Retail Company

What is a Sales Trend by Product Class Report?

Sales trend reports are considered critical management tools and are used by sales and product category managers to better understand year-over-year variances and monthly trends. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard report is that it combines detailed monthly metrics with powerful analytical charts. The top section of the report shows two years of monthly sales in addition to variances in amounts and percent. The traffic lights helps focus the user’s attention to significant variances. The rows display products by category. The bottom portion of the report provides trend and variance charts. You find an example of this type of dashboard report below.

Purpose of Sales Trend by Product Class Reports

Retail businesses use Sales by Product Class reports to give managers a multi-year overview of sales for each of its product categories. When used as part of good business practices in retail operations, a company can improve its product decisions related to sales performance as well as reduce the chances that important product sales trends go undetected.

Sales Trend by Product Class Report Example

Here is an example of a Sales Trend by Product Class report with detailed monthly figures for current and prior year as well as a section for graphical analysis.

Example of a Sales Trend by Product Class Report for a Retail Company

Example of a Sales Trend by Product Class Report for a Retail Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard report?

The typical users of this type of dashboard report are: Executives, store and regional managers, category managers.

Other Dashboard and Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Sales by Product Class Reports

Progressive retail operations departments sometimes use several different Sales by Product Class Reports, along with general sales forecasts and budgets, sales dashboards, KPI dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Sales Report by Product and Store for a Retail Company

What is a Sales Report by Product and Store?

Product and store sales reports are considered essential operational analysis tools and are used by sales and product category managers to compare performance by store and region. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard report is that it combines variance analysis with store benchmarking. The columns display major product categories and within each of these the user finds current month, same period last year and variances. The rows dynamically list the chosen regions and the store locations within each region. You find an example of this type of dashboard report below.

Purpose of Product and Store Sales Reports

Retail businesses use Product and Store Sales Reports to benchmark sales performance across stores and regions. When used as part of good business practices in retail operations, a company can improve its store and territory decisions as well as reduce the chances that to underperformers go undetected for longer periods of time.

Product and Store Sales Report Example

Here is an example of a Sales Report comparing stores and product categories.

Example of a Sales Report by Product and Store for a Retail Company

Example of a Sales Report by Product and Store for a Retail Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard report?

The typical users of this type of dashboard report are: Executives, store and regional managers, category managers.

Other Dashboard reports Often Used in Conjunction with Product and Store Sales Reports

Progressive retail operations departments sometimes use several different Product and Store Sales Reports, along with general sales forecasts and budgets, sales dashboards, KPI dashboards, consolidation reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples