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Example of a Profit & Loss Variance Report for Media Companies

What is a Profit & Loss Variance Report for Media Companies?

Profit & Loss Variance Reports are considered monthly analysis tools and are used by executives and financial leaders to review profit margins and variances. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it is combines charts and a typical P&L layout with dynamic rows that automatically includes new general ledger (GL) accounts. The charts highlight KPIs for Revenues, Profit, Profit Margin, and Revenue per Employee. The detailed figures include: Actuals for the month, Actuals for the same month last year, Variance, Variance in percent, Budget for the current month with variances, Actual year-to-date (YTD) current year, and Actual year-to-date (YTD) prior year with variances. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Profit & Loss Variance Reports

Media companies use Profit & Loss Variance Reports to give managers a clear financial picture of the business and in an easily readable format. When used as part of good business practices in Executive and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, a company can improve its decision-making and grow related revenues, and it can reduce the chances that managers miss the “story” behind the numbers.

Example of a Profit & Loss Variance Report

Here is an example of a Profit & Loss Report with charts, traffic light indicators and a modern layout.

Example of a Profit & Loss Variance Report for Media Companies

Example of a Profit & Loss Variance Report for Media Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Board Members, CEOs and other executives, Financial Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Profit & Loss Reports

Progressive Executive and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Profit & Loss Reports, along with balance sheets, cash flow statements, profit & loss budgets, annual budgets, financial dashboards, KPI dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Sales Forecast Model for Media Companies

What is a Sales Forecast Model for Media Companies?

Sales Forecast Models are considered planning tools and are used by sales and budget managers to estimate the revenue from subscriptions, advertising, etc. for the remainder of the year. Some of the main functionality in this type of input template is that it automatically displays the actual data for the historical months and opens the remainder periods of the year for input. The rows list the media categories (print copies, subscriptions, advertising, etc.) by media brand. The bottom of the form shows the grand total actual and forecasted revenues by month. You find an example of this type of input template below.

Purpose of Sales Forecast Input Models

Media companies use Sales Forecast Input Models to speed up and simplify data entry of sales forecasts. When used as part of good business practices in Sales and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, a company can improve its forecasting accuracy and related sales tactics, and it can reduce the chances that overspending that are caused by over-optimistic revenue plans occurs.

Example of a Sales Forecast Input Model

Here is an example of a Sales Forecast Input Template with actual data and data entry for remaining months of the year.

Example of a Sales Forecast Model for Media Companies

Example of a Sales Forecast Model for Media Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Input template?

The typical users of this type of input template are: VP of Sales, Sales Managers, Budget Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Sales Forecast Input Models

Progressive sales and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Sales Forecast Input Models, along with profit & loss budgets, payroll budgets, capex budgets, variance reports, financial dashboards, budget dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Weekly Sales Budget for a Retail Company - Example

What is a Weekly Sales Budget?

Detailed price and quantity sales estimates are considered a critical part of a retail company’s budget and forecast processes, and are often used by regional sales executives and store managers to capture expected product sales in future weeks and months. Key functionality in this type of model automatically pulls up the item price and cost (entered in a different template) and then multiplies it with the quantity figures entered in the form seen below. This drives the expected sales amount per product, per store and in total for the company. As seen below, the input forms allows for 4-4-5 breakdown of weeks. You will find an example of this type of model below.

Purpose of Sales Planning by Week

Retail companies use Sales Planning by Week to simplify the data capture of volume estimates from regional or store managers, and to get a detailed view of expected sales quantities and revenues by product. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its sales forecast accuracy which helps to budget for expenses and investments, as well as, reduce the chances that sales revenues become sub-optimized due to poor inventory planning.

Sales Planning by Week Example

Here is an example of Sales Planning input form that captures expected sales quantities by week.

Weekly Sales Budget for a Retail Company - Example

Weekly Sales Budget for a Retail Company – Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here.

Who Uses This Type of Model?

The typical users of this type of model are: Budget managers, regional sales managers, product managers.

Other Models Often Used in Conjunction with Sales Planning 

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Sales Planning templates, along with product price and cost budgets, capex, operating expenses, cash flow plans and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Sales Price and Cost Budget per Product for a Retail Company

What is a Sales Price and Cost Budget per Product?

Product price and cost budget templates are considered an essential component of a retail sales budget or forecast and are used by regional sales executives and store managers to plan for weekly or monthly sales. Key functionality in this type of input form displays items by product group down the rows and Price and Cost in the columns. Using budget versioning, multiple price and cost scenarios can be created. The resulting figures are pulled up in a Quantity input template and used to calculate the total expected sales revenue per item. While a corporate user often enters the price and cost in this template, it is typical that regional managers or store managers later capture the forecasted sales quantities. You will find an example of this type of input form below.

Purpose of Product Price and Cost Models

Retail companies use Product Price and Cost Models to easily capture detailed estimates per item that is then multiplied with sales quantity forecasts to drive the total sales revenue per product, store, region and when consolidated. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a retail corporation can improve its sales forecast accuracy which helps to budget for expenses and investments, as well as, reduce the chances that inventories end up too high or too low.

Product Price and Cost Budget Model Example

Here is an example of Retail planning template for Product Price and Cost.

Sales Price and Cost Budget per Product for a Retail Company

Sales Price and Cost Budget per Product for a Retail Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here.

Who Uses This Type of Input Form?

The typical users of this type of input form are: Budget managers, regional sales managers, product managers.

Other Input Forms Often Used in Conjunction with Product Price and Cost Models

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Product Price and Cost Models, along with sales quantity budgets, capex, operating expenses, cash flow plans and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

In this article, Retail budgeting and forecasting will take center stage, specifically for Microsoft Dynamics NAV users seeking today’s planning features and functionalities.

Whether you are budgeting, forecasting, or comparing what-if scenarios for your organization, historical actuals and projected figures are required so you can strategize particularly for your retail company, maneuvering through challenges and opportunities in the upcoming months and years.  There are plenty of solutions that are impactful for retail organizations to upgrade planning procedures with Dynamics NAV, whether you elect to build your own process, depend on NAV’s built-in budgeting functionality, or go with an independent software vendor (ISV) tool.  This article will explore the most popular options for modern budgeting, forecasting, and modeling, particularly to meet your retail planning goals with Microsoft Dynamics NAV.
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This article will discuss budgeting solutions for Professional Sports Teams using Microsoft Dynamics GP, with a focus on feature and functionality offerings for planning processes.

Budgeting might be one of the more logistically complicated organizational processes, probably due to the tedium of manual Excel budgeting for budget managers.  Excel might be the international go-to software for finance departments, but the spreadsheet program typically can’t handle planning for organizations of a healthy size, like professional sports teams.  More Microsoft Dynamics GP customers are choosing independent software vendor (ISV) budgeting tools for expanding and updating their planning processes.  Some of today’s third party software streamlines budgeting and forecasting by zooming in on secure teamwork.  Planning processes typically require collaboration in the important effort to live within our (organizational) means, with help from historical actuals and projections from all areas of the company.
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In this article, Microsoft Dynamics NAV customers can learn about top features and functionalities of third party planning software options to expand budgeting and forecasting processes.

My theory for why budgeting is such a dreaded responsibility has to do with how tedious manual Excel budgeting processes can be for budget managers.  Excel might be globally entrenched in the finance culture, but the spreadsheet application performs below par for any healthy organization.  More and more Microsoft Dynamics NAV users are turning to independent software vendor (ISV) budgeting tools to expand and modernize their planning tasks.  Some of the modern ISV tools streamline and expedite budgeting and forecasting by focusing on secure collaboration.  Budgeting and forecasting are regular processes elevated by teamwork because of the necessity to live within the financial means of an organization based on actuals and research from all areas of the company.
Read more