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Monthly Profit & Loss Report with Budget and Forecast Variances Example

What is a Monthly Profit & Loss Report with Budget and Forecast Variances?

Monthly Profit & Loss Variance Reports are considered core financial statements and are often used by executives and financial managers to review month end results. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it provides actual to budget and forecast comparison for the current period. It also shows the full year budget versus the revised forecast. Rows are grouped by department and can be expanded to view the individual accounts.. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Profit & Loss Reports with Budget and Forecast Variances

Companies and organizations use Profit & Loss Reports with Budget and Forecast Variances to easily view actual revenue, expense and profit performance compared to both the annual budget and the forecast. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Department, a company can improve its monthly and year end tracking against plan as well as reduce the chances that managers lose sight of gaps between current performance versus current and year end budget and forecast.

Profit & Loss Reports with Budget and Forecast Variance Example

Here is an example of a Profit & Loss Report with variances against budget and forecast.

Monthly Profit & Loss Report with Budget and Forecast Variances Example

Monthly Profit & Loss Report with Budget and Forecast Variances Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Executives and Department Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Profit & Loss Reports with Budget and Forecast Variances

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Profit & Loss Reports with Budget and Forecast Variances, along with balance sheets, cash flow reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Profit & Loss Variance Report with Expandable YTD Columns Example

What is a Profit & Loss Variance Report with Expandable YTD columns?

Profit & Loss Variance Reports are considered essential month-end reports and are often used by executives and the finance team to analyze the components that drive profitability. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it automatically provides a presentation quality layout with account-level detail and traffic lights to highlight important variances. Each of the year-to-date columns can be expanded to see each individual month from the beginning of the year until the current period. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Profit & Loss Variance Reports

Companies and organizations use Profit & Loss Variance Reports to analyze revenues, expenses and profitability and to easily detect variances versus the same period last year and compared to the budget. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Department, a company can improve its ability to interpret monthly financial results as well as reduce the chances that significant revenue or expense-related performance issues goes undetected.

Profit & Loss Variance Report Example

Here is an example of modern Profit & Loss Variance Report with expandable YTD columns and traffic lights to highlight important variances.

Profit & Loss Variance Report with Expandable YTD Columns Example

Profit & Loss Variance Report with Expandable YTD Columns Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Board Members, Executives and Department Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Profit & Loss Variance Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Profit & Loss Variance Reports, along with balance sheets, cash flow reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Narrative Profit & Loss Report Example

What is a Narrative Profit & Loss Report?

Narrative Financial Reports are considered easy to read financial summaries and are often used by Financial Analysts and CFOs to provide end users with a very easy-to-read, newspaper-like cover page for their Profit & Loss and other number-intense reports. Some of the key functionality in this type of innovative report is that it updates all the text, inserted numbers and charts completely automatically. All the user has to do is run the report for the desired month and the text will refresh with the right data. Even adjectives in headers and text change based on business rules. The underlying numerical report is presented on the second tab. You find an example of this type of innovative report below.

Purpose of Narrative Financial Reports

Companies and organizations use Narrative Financial Reports to give executives and managers that are not financial experts a very easy and user-friendly format to interprete financial results. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Department, a company can improve its ability to drive interest and analytical capabilities outside of the finance team as well as reduce the chances that other departments and executives miss the monthly financial highlights.

Narrative Financial Report Example

Here is an example of an automatically generated Narrative Profit & Loss Report with the detailed financial statement on the second page.

P&L – Auto Narrated

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Innovative report?

The typical users of this type of innovative report are: Board Members, Executives and Department Managers.

Other Innovative reports Often Used in Conjunction with Narrative Financial Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Narrative Financial Reports, along with financial statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Rolling 13 Month Profit & Loss Report Example

What is a Rolling 13 Month Profit & Loss Report?

Rolling Profit & Loss Reports are considered financial trend reports and are often used by CFOs and Executives to analyze trends in profitability and the revenues and expenses driving it. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it automatically displays the full profit & loss for the current month as well as the prior 12 months. This feature is driven by the period parameter the user enters to run the report. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Profit & Loss Rolling Trend Reports

Companies and organizations use Profit & Loss Rolling Trend Reports to analyze how historical trends in revenues and expenses are affecting margins and profitability. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Department, a company can improve its ability to track trends in revenues, expenses, margins and profitability as well as reduce the chances that important trends in metrics are missed and that gross margin and/or profit deteriorates as a result of this.

Profit & Loss Rolling Trend Report Example

Here is an example of a 13 Month Rolling Profit & Loss Trend Report.

Rolling 13 Month Profit & Loss Report Example

Rolling 13 Month Profit & Loss Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: CFOs and Executives.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Profit & Loss Rolling Trend Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Profit & Loss Rolling Trend Reports, along with trended balance sheets, cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

LOS ANGELES, CA. – August 5, 2020 – Solver, ranked among the highest rated companies in cloud-based Corporate Performance Management (CPM) for customer satisfaction by G2, announced its partnership with Binary Stream, a Gold Enterprise Resource Planning Partner Independent Software Vendor (ISV) delivering scalable software solutions simplifying company processes, such as subscription billing automation for Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) customers.

Solver and Binary Stream have partnered to integrate Solver’s cloud-based CPM application with Binary Stream’s enterprise-grade software solution to offer customers a pre-configured integration and pre-built report templates.  With this partnership, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central customers using Binary Stream’s Multi-Entity Management and Subscription Billing Management apps can now use Solver to create professional grade reports across all of their data.

The integration enables quick loading of dimensions and data from Binary Stream’s tables in Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central. The report templates include more than 10 different layouts.  Subscription Billing Management reports include: Churn Analysis; MRR; Monthly revenue per product/customer; Eight quarter rolling subscription revenue trend; Scheduled billing; invoiced vs. recognized amount; Deferred revenue current year and next three years; and Subscription revenue forecasting. A report example is shown below:

Press Release Binary Stream Image 1

For Multi Entity Management, reports include: Consolidating P&L; and Multi-company benchmarking. An example of this report is shown below:

Press Release Binary Stream Image 2

By partnering together for this integration, Solver and Binary Stream are focusing on delivering rapid time-to-value for Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central customers looking for advanced cloud-based financial and operational reporting. Budgeting and Forecasting is also provided as an option.

“Our relationship with Binary Stream goes back many years. In fact, Solver is one of their customers. In this project, engineers from both companies collaborated together to configure the integrations and to discuss reporting ideas,” says Nils Rasmussen, CEO at Solver. He continues, “Our mutual goal is to enable faster and better decisions for our joint customers by making it faster and easier to deploy our cloud products together with Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central.”

Lak Chahal, President and CEO at Binary Stream added, “We are excited to collaborate and innovate in digital transformation with Solver, and to jointly offer Microsoft Dynamics 365 Finance and Dynamics 365 Business Central users with a streamlined way to access clearer insights and make better business decisions regardless of the complexity of their underlying processes and data.”

 

About Solver

With a quickly growing community of thousands of global customers and hundreds of partners worldwide, Solver provides a leading cloud Corporate Performance Management suite for Microsoft Dynamics 365 Finance and Business Central, Acumatica, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, NetSuite and other ERPs. Solver is ranked in the leader quadrant in the Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Software Grid on G2, Solver is also the overall Leader in Customer Experience Model in 2020 Dresner Wisdom of Crowds® Enterprise Performance Management Market Study and as a Microsoft Gold ISV Partner, Solver has won countless awards, including the Microsoft BI Partner of Year Award, recognition on the Gartner Group CPM Magic Quadrant, and Best Places to Work for a workplace culture that celebrates customer service, integrity, and innovation. Solver was named best in class for consulting continuity in Dresner’s Wisdom of Crowds EPM market report.  Solver is sold through its 12 global offices and a worldwide network of partners. For any questions, visit www.solverglobal.com or contact Solver at info@solverglobal.com.

 

About Binary Stream

Binary Stream is a Gold-Certified Microsoft ISV developing innovative solutions for digital transformation within both cloud and on-premise Microsoft Dynamics ERPs. Binary Stream’s award-winning solutions help streamline various business processes involving consolidation accounting, subscription management, property lease management, and healthcare supply chains. Being directly-embedded within the core platform, Binary Stream solutions extend the functionality of Dynamics 365 Finance, Dynamics 365 Business Central, and Dynamics GP.

With over 20 years of experience, Binary Stream continues to help organizations scale their businesses with robust functionality tailored to the finance, healthcare, real estate, manufacturing & distribution, and software industries. Over 2,000 organizations around the world trust Binary Stream to manage their financial processes with confidence and ease, while gaining the flexibility they need to cater to their customers. Backed by superb sales, development, implementation, and support teams, Binary Stream enables Microsoft Partners to provide their clients with future-proof solutions by building reliable, trust-worthy relationships. For any questions, please visit www.binarystream.com or contact Binary Stream at sales@binarystream.com.

Trial Balance Monthly Trend Report Example

What is a Trial Balance Monthly Trend Report?

Trial Balance Monthly Trend Reports are considered control reports and are often used by accountants to ensure that their General Ledger is in balance. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it dynamically displays the current year’s opening balance as well as every single month up to the current period. This provides the accountant with a single view of all account balances in the current year. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Trial Balance Monthly Trend Reports

Companies and organizations use Trial Balance Monthly Trend Reports to easily detect issues with account balances that may have started in prior months. When used as part of good business practices in a Finance & Accounting Department, a company can improve its financial accuracy and control as well as reduce the chances that financial statements are wrong over multiple months because of an issue that may have started in a previous period.

Trial Balance Monthly Trend Report Example

Here is an example of Trial Balance Monthly Trend Report with current and past periods listed across the columns.

Trial Balance Monthly Trend Report Example

Trial Balance Monthly Trend Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Trial Balance Monthly Trend Reports

Progressive Finance & Accounting Departments sometimes use several different Trial Balance Monthly Trend Reports, along with financial statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Trial Balance Variance Report Example

What is a Trial Balance Variance Report?

Trial Balance Variance Reports are considered control reports and are often used by accountants to ensure that their General Ledger is in balance. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it not only displays the current month’s account balances, but it also provides a comparison to last year. This additional data along with % variance columns and a control total makes this report more useful than typical single month trial balance reports. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Trial Balance Variance Reports

Companies and organizations use Trial Balance Variance Reports to increase their capability to detect issues in their balances as compared to what single month trial balance reports provide. When used as part of good business practices in a Finance & Accounting Department, a company can improve its financial accuracy and control as well as reduce the chances that financial statements are wrong because of an issue with their general ledger entries.

Trial Balance Variance Report Example

Here is an example of Trial Balance Variance Report with actual last year and % variances.

Trial Balance Variance Report Example

Trial Balance Variance Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Trial Balance Variance Reports

Progressive Finance & Accounting Departments sometimes use several different Trial Balance Variance Reports, along with financial statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Rolling 13 Month Cash Flow Report Example

What is a Rolling 13 Month Cash Flow Report?

Rolling Cash Flow Reports are considered financial trend reports and are often used by CFOs and Treasurers to analyze liquidity and related cash inflows and outflows. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it automatically displays the cash flow for the current month as well as the prior 12 months. This feature is driven by the period parameter the user enters to run the report. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Cash Flow Rolling Trend Reports

Companies and organizations use Cash Flow Rolling Trend Reports to analyze how historical trends in cash inflows and outflows are affecting their liquidity. When used as part of good business practices in a Finance & Accounting Department, a company can improve its cash flow situation as well as reduce the chances that any liquidity issues occur in the months ahead.

Cash Flow Rolling Trend Report Example

Here is an example of a 13 Month Rolling Cash Flow Trend Report.

Rolling 13 Month Cash Flow Report Example

Rolling 13 Month Cash Flow Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: CFOs, Treasurers and Analysts.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Cash Flow Rolling Trend Reports

Progressive Finance & Accounting Departments sometimes use several different Cash Flow Rolling Trend Reports, along with trended profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow forecasting and simulation models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Profit & Loss Variance Report Example

What is a Profit & Loss Variance Report?

Profit & Loss Variance Reports are considered a key component in month end reporting packages and are often used by managers and executives to analyze revenues, expenses and profitability across the business. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it provides monthly and year-to-date variances to both budget and last year’s actuals. Key metrics from the report, such as revenue, payroll and profit margin, are also displayed as charts on the top of the report. In the body of the report itself, users can right click on any figure and drill down to GL or even sub-ledger detail. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Profit & Loss Variance Reports

Companies and organizations use Profit & Loss Variance Reports to provide their managers with professional and easy to read financial analysis. When used as part of good business practices in a Finance & Accounting Department, a company can improve its ability to serve executives and line managers with easy to analyze reports as well as reduce the chances that important performance metrics are missed or not understood by non-financial staff members.

Profit & Loss Variance Report Example

Here is an example of a modern Profit & Loss Variance Report with KPIs displayed as charts.

Profit & Loss Variance Report Example

Profit & Loss Variance Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Board Members, the Executive Team, Controllers and, in some cases, department heads.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Profit & Loss Variance Reports

Progressive Finance & Accounting Departments sometimes use several different Profit & Loss Variance Reports, along with balance sheets, cash flow reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Trended Balance Sheet Report Example

What is a Trended Balance Sheet Report?

Trended Balance Sheets are considered key month-end reports in many companies and are often used by the finance team to analyze monthly trends in assets, liabilities and equity. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it dynamically lists months in the columns, starting with January and going up to the current period. Users can drill down on any figure to analyze the underlying transactions. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Balance Sheet Trend Reports

Companies and organizations use Balance Sheet Trend Reports to quickly determine any upwards or downwards patterns of any particular item on the statement. When used as part of good business practices in a Finance & Accounting Department, a company can improve its ability quickly to detect trends or exceptions as well as reduce the chances that issues with important items such as cash, receivables or payables are caught late in the game.

Balance Sheet Trend Report Example

Here is an example of Trended Balance Sheet report with months across the columns.

Trended Balance Sheet Report Example

Trended Balance Sheet Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Board Members, the Executive Team and Controllers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Balance Sheet Trend Reports

Progressive Finance & Accounting Departments sometimes use several different Balance Sheet Trend Reports, along with trended profit & loss reports, cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples