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Example of a Project Manager Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

What is  Project Manager Dashboard?

Project Manager Dashboards are considered key performance indicator (KPI) analysis tools and are used by project leaders and executives to enable easy monitoring of important trends and variances related to services and clients. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it the user can run the report to get a snapshot of the current month or any historical period and all the data will update accordingly. The report provides analysis from six different perspectives: 1) Monthly trend in client billing, 2) Monthly trend in non-reimbursable expenses benchmarked against the average, 3) Monthly trend showing individual PM utilization benchmarked against the average, 4) Percent of projects with red, yellow and green status, 5) Monthly trend in billable versus non-billable hours, and 6) Top 10 clients ranked by billing amount. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Project Manager Dashboards

Professional Services organizations use Project Manager Dashboards to enable leaders with a clear, self-service view of important KPIs and trends related to their clients and projects. When used as part of good business practices in FP&A and PMO departments, a company can improve its project strategies and revenue growth, and it can reduce the chances that project/client outliers or trends are left untouched due to lack of visibility to performance metrics.

Example of a Project Manager Dashboard

Here is an example of a Project Manager Dashboard with trends and benchmarking for project and client KPIs.

Example of a Project Manager Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

Example of a Project Manager Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Service Leaders, Project Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Project Manager Dashboards

Progressive FP&A and PMO departments sometimes use several different Project Manager Dashboards, along with profit & loss reports, KPI dashboards, project detailed project reports, project forecast models, annual budget models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Project Revenue and Expense Dashboard for a Professional Services Company

What is  Project Revenue and Expense Dashboard?

Project Dashboards are considered operational analysis tools and are used by project leaders and executives to monitor billing trends and expenses. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it is parameter driven and users can run it for any month and year to see relevant data. The four charts in the dashboards show: 1) Monthly trend in project billing, 2) Billable versus non-billable hours by client, 3) Top ten clients ranked by billing amount, and 4) Reimbursable expenses by category. At the bottom of the report (not visible in the example) there is a a table section with the metrics that supports the charts. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Project Revenue and Expense Dashboards

Professional Services organizations use Project Revenue and Expense Dashboards to give managers in the Project Management Office (PMO) a self-service tool to monitor key billing and utilization information by client. When used as part of good business practices in FP&A and PMO departments, a company can improve its project strategies and profitability, and it can reduce the chances that project/client outliers or trends are missed due to lack of visibility to real-time performance metrics.

Example of a Project Revenue and Expense Dashboard

Here is an example of a Project Revenue and Expense Dashboard with billing trends and expense analysis.

Example of a Project Revenue and Expense Dashboard for a Professional Services Company

Example of a Project Revenue and Expense Dashboard for a Professional Services Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Service Leaders, CFOs, Project Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Project Revenue and Expense Dashboards

Progressive FP&A and PMO departments sometimes use several different Project Revenue and Expense Dashboards, along with detailed project reports, project dashboards, project budgets, project forecast models, utilization reports, billing reports, financial statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Project Status Overview Report

What is a Project Status Overview Report?

Project overview reports are considered operational analysis tools and are used by professional service executives and consulting managers to get a clear picture of the stages of their projects’ life cycle and status ratios compared to the prior year. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it provides a year-over-year comparison of four metrics, including charts: 1) Projects on time, 2) New projects, 3) Cancelled projects, and 4) Completed projects. All these metrics are shown as ratios across companies/locations grouped by category and region. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Project Status Overview Reports

Technology companies use Project Status Overview Reports to analyze performance by stage and then compare it to the same metrics for the prior year to look for important variances. When used as part of good business practices in Project Management departments, a company can improve its professional services strategies and related revenues, and it can reduce the chances that managers miss out on important trends.

Example of a Project Status Overview Report

Here is an example of a Project Status Summary Report with ratios and comparisons to prior year.

Example of a Project Status Overview Report

Example of a Project Status Overview Report

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Project Management Offices (PMO), Directors of Services, Consulting Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Project Status Overview Reports

Progressive Project Management departments sometimes use several different Project Status Overview Reports, along with detailed project reports, project dashboards, billing reports, project budgets and forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Project Performance Dashboard for Technology Companies

What is a Project Performance Dashboard?

Project Dashboards are considered professional services analysis tools and are used by Executives and Consulting Leaders to review and benchmark performance across consulting teams and projects. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides KPI analysis from five different perspectives. These include: 1) Percent of projects on budget with comparison to prior year, 2) Percent of projects on time with prior year comparison, 3) Percent of projects cancelled versus prior year, 4) Percent of projects completed in the current year versus prior year, and 5) Table with percent-based metrics and year over year comparison and variances by customer and consulting team, including: Projects on budget, Projects on time, Projects cancelled, and Projects completed. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Project Analysis Dashboards

Tech companies use Project Analysis Dashboards to look for trends, opportunities and issues in their professional services business. When used as part of good business practices in a Project Management Office (PMO) and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, an organization can improve its services revenues and strategic planning, and it can reduce the chances that managers miss important signals in their consulting metrics with resulting lack of action.

Example of a Project Analysis Dashboard

Here is an example of a Project Performance Dashboard with year-over-year comparisons.

Example of a Project Performance Dashboard for Technology Companies

Example of a Project Performance Dashboard for Technology Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, Consulting Leaders, Project Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Project Analysis Dashboards

Progressive Project Management Office (PMO) and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Project Analysis Dashboards, along with detailed utilization reports, detailed project reports, billing reports, consulting dashboards, PMO dashboards, financial reports, financial KPI dashboards, project forecasting models, annual consulting budgets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Project Dashboard for a Professional Services Company

What is a Project Dashboard for a Professional Services Company?

Project Dashboards are considered operational monitoring tools and are used by executives and project managers to analyze consulting resources and project performance. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it enables analysis of KPIs and other metrics from six different perspectives: 1) Project manager ranked by billings and with billable amount, billable hours and nonbillable hours, 2) Consultants ranked by billable amount and with billable hours and nonbillable hours, 3) Number of projects by project manager (PM), 4) Percent of projects with green, yellow and red status, 5) Monthly trend in billable amounts, and 6) Monthly trend in billable hours. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Project Dashboards

Professional service organizations use Project Dashboards to gives consulting leaders an easy way to understand how project managers, consultants and projects are performing. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Consulting departments, an organization can improve its decision speed as it relates to projects and professional resources, and it can reduce the chances that poor performance goes undetected with likely resulting loss in revenues.

Example of a Project Dashboard

Here is an example of a Project Dashboard with metrics of PMs and their team members as well as project status.

Example of a Project Dashboard for a Professional Services Company

Example of a Project Dashboard for a Professional Services Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, CFOs, consulting managers, project managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Project Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Consulting departments sometimes use several different Project Dashboards, along with profit & loss reports, project dashboards, revenue dashboards, detailed billing and utilization reports, project budget models, billing forecast models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

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It really doesn’t matter if you call them dashboards, data visualizations, charts, or graphical scorecards, they’re everywhere nowadays.  This is probably due to the fact that they are the #1 priority in terms of software that executives are seeking, based on Gartner’s survey on Financial Executive International CFO Technology.  Since it seems like we are moving at the speed of light in business, easily accessible, quickly digestible data analyses are extremely valuable.  Dashboards provide precisely that – charts, graphs, and scorecards demonstrate trends, successes, and problem areas through key performance indicators (KPIs) and data to best keep a project, a department, or the entire company on track.
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