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Example of a Project Revenue and Expense Dashboard for a Professional Services Company

What is  Project Revenue and Expense Dashboard?

Project Dashboards are considered operational analysis tools and are used by project leaders and executives to monitor billing trends and expenses. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it is parameter driven and users can run it for any month and year to see relevant data. The four charts in the dashboards show: 1) Monthly trend in project billing, 2) Billable versus non-billable hours by client, 3) Top ten clients ranked by billing amount, and 4) Reimbursable expenses by category. At the bottom of the report (not visible in the example) there is a a table section with the metrics that supports the charts. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Project Revenue and Expense Dashboards

Professional Services organizations use Project Revenue and Expense Dashboards to give managers in the Project Management Office (PMO) a self-service tool to monitor key billing and utilization information by client. When used as part of good business practices in FP&A and PMO departments, a company can improve its project strategies and profitability, and it can reduce the chances that project/client outliers or trends are missed due to lack of visibility to real-time performance metrics.

Example of a Project Revenue and Expense Dashboard

Here is an example of a Project Revenue and Expense Dashboard with billing trends and expense analysis.

Example of a Project Revenue and Expense Dashboard for a Professional Services Company

Example of a Project Revenue and Expense Dashboard for a Professional Services Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Service Leaders, CFOs, Project Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Project Revenue and Expense Dashboards

Progressive FP&A and PMO departments sometimes use several different Project Revenue and Expense Dashboards, along with detailed project reports, project dashboards, project budgets, project forecast models, utilization reports, billing reports, financial statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Revenue Estimate Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

What is a Revenue Estimate Dashboard for Professional Services Companies?

Revenue Estimate Dashboards are considered planning tools and are used by project leaders and executives to analyze expected revenues from clients and projects. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it is a monthly report that dynamically displays service metrics from three different perspectives: 1) Revenue estimate ranked by client, 2) Project pipeline by client with high and low estimates, and 3) Monthly trend for project pipeline with high/low estimates. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Service Revenue Estimate Dashboards

Professional Services organizations use Revenue Estimate Dashboards to easily forecast expected billing revenues in the pipeline. When used as part of good business practices in FP&A and Project departments, a company can improve its tactical decisions and increase revenues, and it can reduce the chances that project/client outliers or trends are left untouched due to lack of visibility to performance metrics.

Example of a Service Revenue Estimate Dashboard

Here is an example of a Revenue Estimate Dashboard with client ranking and pipeline trends.

Example of a Revenue Estimate Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

Example of a Revenue Estimate Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, Service Leaders, CFOs, Project Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Service Revenue Estimate Dashboards

Progressive FP&A and Project departments sometimes use several different Service Revenue Estimate Dashboards, along with detailed project reports, project dashboards, project budgets, project forecast models, utilization reports, financial statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of an Executive Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

What is an Executive Dashboard for Professional Services Companies?

Executive Dashboards are considered monitoring tools and are used by senior leaders as a self-service, real-time solution to review revenue and expense trends as well as key project metrics. Some of the main functionality in this type of visual report is that it is parameter driven so the user can run it for any year and month to see the result graphically. The report shows eight perspectives of the business, including: 1) Actual versus budget revenue by category, 2) Actual and budget monthly revenue trend, 3) Top five expenses with actual to budget comparison, 4) Actual and budget expense trend, 5) Pipeline by project, with high and low estimates, 6) Monthly pipeline trend with high and low estimates, 7) Top ten clients by billing amount, and 8) Bottom ten clients by billing amount. Below the charts there is a table section showing the figures used in the visuals. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Executive Dashboards for Professional Services

Professional Services organizations use Executive Dashboards to give leaders an easy way to analyze the top performance drivers of the company. When used as part of good business practices in Executive departments, a company can improve its strategic decisions and financial performance, and it can reduce the chances that key profitability inhibitors are not addressed in a timely fashion due to lack of insight to the underlying metrics.

Example of a Executive Dashboards for Professional Service

Here is an example of an Executive Dashboard with revenue and expense trends and variances as well as client rankings.

Example of an Executive Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

Example of an Executive Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Visual report?

The typical users of this type of visual report are: CEOs, COOs, CFOs, CROs and other top leaders.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Executive Dashboards for Professional Services

Progressive Executive departments sometimes use several different Executive Dashboards, along with profit & loss reports, KPI dashboards, project dashboards and detailed project reports, project forecast models, annual budget models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of an Actual and Estimated Consulting Hours Report for a Technology Company

What is an Actual and Estimated Consulting Hours Report?

Professional Services reports showing actual and estimated hours are considered operational analysis and planning tools and are used by consulting managers to track consultant hours delivered per project. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it is parameter driven and can be run for any month, entity and project(s). It compares the actual hours each consultant delivered by project versus the estimated hours and displays the variance amount and percent with exception highlighting. The rows can be expanded and collapsed and they group projects by consultant and region/entity. The chart compares the grand total hours delivered for the chosen time period versus the estimated hours. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Actual and Estimated Hours Reports

Technology companies use Actual and Estimated Hours Reports to easily monitor each of the organization’s locations and their ability to achieve or exceed the professional service hours they targeted. When used as part of good business practices in Project Management departments, a company can improve its estimate accuracy and therefore increase its ability to drive revenues with optimal human resource planning, and it can reduce the chances that managers react slowly, or not at all-, to trends and outliers.

Example of an Actual and Estimated Hours Report

Here is an example of an actual and estimated hours per consultant report with roll-up by project and region.

Example of an Actual and Estimated Consulting Hours Report for a Technology Company

Example of an Actual and Estimated Consulting Hours Report for a Technology Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Project Managers, Project Management Offices (PMO), Directors of Services, Consulting Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Actual and Estimated Hours Reports

Progressive Executive and Project Management departments sometimes use several different Actual and Estimated Hours Reports, along with detailed project reports, utilization reports, project dashboards, billing reports, project budgets and forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Consulting Time Dashboard for Technology Companies

What is a Consulting Time Dashboard for Technology Companies?

Time analysis dashboards are considered operational reports and are used by Executives and Consulting Leaders to track estimated and reported hours across clients and projects. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides monitoring of hours across five different perspectives: 1) Table by region/project/consultant and with metrics for Estimated hours, reported hours and variance, 2) Monthly trend with estimated and reported hours, 3) Reported hours by region (geographical map), 4) Ranked hours by customer, and 5) Ranked hours by project. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Consulting Time Dashboards

Tech companies use Consulting Time Dashboards to give managers an easy was to slice and dice their use of hours by customer, region and project. When used as part of good business practices in Professional Services and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, an organization can improve its utilization strategies and related revenue, and it can reduce the chances that available capacity is wasted due to poor insight to trends and actual performance.

Example of a Consulting Time Dashboard

Here is an example of a Consulting Time Dashboards with metrics and trends related to actual and estimated hours.

Example of a Consulting Time Dashboard for Technology Companies

Example of a Consulting Time Dashboard for Technology Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, Consulting Managers, Consulting Team Leaders.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Consulting Time Dashboards

Progressive Consulting and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Consulting Dashboards, along with detailed utilization reports, billing reports, financial reports, financial KPI dashboards, project forecasts, budget models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

The information you are reading is more than 2 years old and may be outdated. Read new blogs.

In this article, we will explore the necessity of training in getting the most ROI on your Cloud Corporate Performance Management and Business Intelligence solutions.

On this blog, we have been discussing the service packages that can come with ownership and management of a cloud Corporate Performance Management (CPM) and/or Business Intelligence (BI) solution – and so far, we’ve explored the importance of support and consulting.  This article will explore the final component – why training?  Wasn’t consulting enough?  Is it an essential part of the experience of owning and mastering the management of your cloud BI or CPM tool?  This article will set out to answer these questions and more about the relevance of training to your daily work within a cloud BI or CPM solution.
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The information you are reading is more than 2 years old and may be outdated. Read new blogs.

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This article will explore the need for skilled consulting in maximizing your Corporate Performance Management and Business Intelligence solutions.

I recently wrote about the importance of a Support package when it comes to owning and managing a Corporate Performance Management (CPM) and/or Business Intelligence (BI) solution – and how that fits into the context of professional services and training as well.  That article led me to explore more in the area of consulting.  How does an implementation go – with or without consulting?  Why is high quality consulting such an important, if not essential part of getting the most out of your BI and CPM solutions?  This article will discuss the significance of consulting in owning a data analysis and management tool today.
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In this article, data warehouses for Professional Services organizations will take center stage, with a focus on expanding Microsoft Dynamics AX analytical processes.

Data is increasingly more important in today’s business world, perhaps especially for Professional Services organizations.  As data informs decision-making at all levels, Professional Services organizations are striving to stay on budget and on track with projects, vendors, clients, and so forth, a data warehouse can be positively impactful in supporting Business Intelligence (BI) analyses.  If you’re new to data warehousing as a solution, you might have some questions.  This article will go about answering your questions about data warehousing as a Professional Services organization using Microsoft Dynamics AX.
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This article will discuss financial and operational reporting options for Professional Services organizations using Microsoft Dynamics SL, so you can invest in the right software for your team.

In the modern business culture, perhaps especially for Professional Services organizations, a powerful, user friendly report writer is essential to staying competitive in your sector, navigating the ebbs and flows of the economy through smarter decision-making, so you’re continuing to evolve as a business and a brand.  In this article, I’ll lay out some of your options for today’s quality financial and operational reporting solutions, zooming in on features and functionalities, so you can make the best investment to expand your Microsoft Dynamics SL analytics as a Professional Services organization.
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This article discusses budgeting and forecasting solutions for Professional Services teams, zooming in on the top feature and functionalities for Dynamics AX users.

Budgeting can be challenging, regardless of your industry, but fortunately, it is getting more dynamic and user friendly with today’s solutions to upgrade your Microsoft Dynamics AX tasks.  For Professional Services organizations, planning is just as important, but is unique to the nature of the sector – and this is true for most industries, regarding particular budgeting demands.  Plenty of companies are still utilizing Excel for homegrown budget processes, but today’s budgeting demands are more sophisticated than what the spreadsheet application can deliver.  If you’re seeking an independent software vendor (ISV) budgeting tool that enables you to pull historical data from Dynamics AX, as well as payroll and other company- or industry-specific data sources for an aggregated financial plan that is the result of collaboration, this article is a must-read.
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