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Example of a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks

What is a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks?

Reconciliation Reports are considered data control tools and are used by accountants to help ensure that loan-related transactions tie to the General Ledger. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it for any given GL account chosen by the user will list and match with the related deposit transactions. In the columns display months up to the current period to make it easy to track historical balances. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Deposit and GL Reconciliation Reports

Banks use Deposit and GL Reconciliation Reports to automate and speed up the monthly close process and to ensure that data from deposit transactions match with the related GL postings. When used as part of good business practices in Accounting departments, a bank can improve its accounting staff efficiency, and it can reduce the chances that mistakes carry through to financial reports.

Example of a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report

Here is an example of a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report with user-defined parameters for Entity and Account.

Example of a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks

Example of a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Controllers and Accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Deposit and GL Reconciliation Reports

Progressive Accounting departments sometimes use several different Deposit and GL Reconciliation Reports, along with detailed deposit reports, profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from deposit management systems for retail banks and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks

What is a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks?

Reconciliation Reports are considered data control tools and are used by accountants to help ensure that loan-related transactions tie to the General Ledger. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it for any given GL account chosen by the user will list and match with the related loan transactions. The columns list months up to the current period to make it easy to track historical balances. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Loan and GL Reconciliation Reports

Banks use Loan and GL Reconciliation Reports to automate and speed up the monthly close process and to ensure that data from loan transactions match with the related GL postings. When used as part of good business practices in Accounting departments, a bank can improve its accounting staff efficiency, and it can reduce the chances that mistakes carry through to financial reports.

Example of a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report

Here is an example of a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report with user-defined parameters for Entity and Account.

Example of a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks

Example of a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Controllers and Accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Loan and GL Reconciliation Reports

Progressive Accounting departments sometimes use several different Loan and GL Reconciliation Reports, along with Detailed loan reports, profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from loan management systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks

What is a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks?

Reconciliation Reports are considered monthly data control tools and are used by accountants to help ensure that securities-related transactions tie to the General Ledger. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it for any given GL account chosen by the user will list and match with the related securities transactions. Months up to the current period are listed across the columns to track historical balances. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Securities and GL Reconciliation Reports

Banks use Securities and GL Reconciliation Reports to automate and speed up the monthly close process and to ensure that data from sub-ledgers match with the related GL postings. When used as part of good business practices in Accounting departments, a bank can improve its accounting staff efficiency, and it can reduce the chances that mistakes carry through to financial reports.

Example of a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report

Here is an example of a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report with user-defined parameters for Entity and Account.

Example of a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks

Example of a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Controllers and Accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Securities and GL Reconciliation Reports

Progressive Accounting departments sometimes use several different Securities and GL Reconciliation Reports, along with profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements, KPI reports, budget models, forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of an Expense Variance Report for Banks

What is an Expense Variance Report for Banks?

Expense Variance Reports are considered financial control reports and are used by controllers and department managers to monitor actual expenditures compared to the budget. Some of the main functionality in this type of control report is that it dynamically expands expense accounts down the rows and summarize them to sub-totals and a grand total. The three columns show: 1) Actual expenses for the month, 2) Budget, and 3) Variance in percent. You find an example of this type of control report below.

Purpose of Expense Variance Reports

Banks use Expense Variance Reports to give managers an easy way to monitor their department’s expenses and to catch major budget variances. When used as part of good business practices in Accounting departments, a bank can improve its cost control and related decisions, and it can reduce the chances that major budget overruns occur.

Example of an Expense Variance Report

Here is an example of an Expense Variance Report with actual and budget figures.

Example of an Expense Variance Report for Banks

Example of an Expense Variance Report for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Control report?

The typical users of this type of control report are: CFOs, Analysts, Controllers, Cost Accountants, Department Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Expense Variance Reports

Progressive Accounting departments sometimes use several different Expense Variance Reports, along with profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements, KPI reports, expense dashboards, budget models, forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Trended Regulatory Report for Banks

What is a Trended Regulatory Report for Banks?

Trended Regulatory Reports are considered government compliance reports and are used by CFOs, Controllers and Compliance Reporting Managers to provide key financial metrics in a specific reporting format. Some of the main functionality in this type of compliance report is that it is a standard format that populates automatically based on the period.  It dynamically expands months across the columns based on the period you run the report for. The rows in the reports show a typical regulatory report layout with interest income, specifications of loans and advances, and more rolling up to sub-totals. You find an example of this type of compliance report below.

Purpose of Trended Regulatory Reports

Banks use Trended Regulatory Reports to minimize labor and cost by automating the production of compliance reports. When used as part of good business practices in Accounting departments, a bank can improve its regulatory reporting processes, and it can reduce the chances that there are mistakes in reported figures due to manual errors.

Example of a Trended Regulatory Report

Here is an example of a Regulatory Report with monthly figures in the columns.

Example of a Trended Regulatory Report for Banks

Example of a Trended Regulatory Report for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Compliance report?

The typical users of this type of compliance report are: Regulatory Reporting Managers, CFOs, Controllers, Accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Trended Regulatory Reports

Progressive Accounting departments sometimes use several different Trended Regulatory Reports, along with internal financial statements, trial balances, control reports, loan reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Trended Balance Sheet Report for Banks

What is a Trended Balance Sheet Report for Banks?

Trended Balance Sheets are considered analytical financial reports and are used by executives and CFOs to track monthly trends in assets, liabilities and equity. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it dynamically expands months across the columns based on the period you run the report for. The rows in the reports show a typical balance sheet layout with Assets, Liabilities and Equity sections and account balance details rolling up to sub-totals. The user can get further detail by drilling down on individual cells to see transaction-level information. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Trended Balance Sheet Reports

Banks use Trended Balance Sheet Reports to give executives both detailed and summarized views of assets and liabilities for each month up to the current period. When used as part of good business practices in Executive- and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, a bank can improve its strategies and profitability, and it can reduce the chances that leaders make poor decisions because they don’t see if a figure is a trend or an outlier.

Example of a Trended Balance Sheet Report

Here is an example of Trended Balance Sheet Report with dynamic listing of year-to-date months and rows that can expand/collapse to simplify analysis.

Example of a Trended Balance Sheet Report for Banks

Example of a Trended Balance Sheet Report for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Executives, Regional Managers, Branch Managers, CFOs, Analysts.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Trended Balance Sheet Reports

Progressive Executive- and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Balance Sheet Reports, along with income statement variance and trend reports, cash flow statements, financial dashboards, KPI dashboards, budget models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Trended Income Statement for Banks

What is a Trended Income Statement for Banks?

Trended Income Statements are considered core financial reports and are used by executives and branch managers to track monthly trends in revenues, expenses and profitability. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it dynamically expands months across the columns based on the period you run the report for. The rows in the reports are collapsed to provide an easily readable summary. Users click on the ‘+’ sign on the rows to expand and see account detail. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Trended Income Statements

Banks use Trended Income Statements to give executives both detailed and summarized views of revenues, expenses, margins and totals for each month up to the current period. When used as part of good business practices in Executive- and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, a bank can improve its strategies and profitability, and it can reduce the chances that leaders make poor decisions because they don’t see if a figure is a trend or an outlier.

Example of a Trended Income Statement

Here is an example of Trended Income Statement with dynamic listing of year-to-date months and rows that can expand/collapse to simplify analysis.

Example of a Trended Income Statement for Banks

Example of a Trended Income Statement for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Executives, Regional Managers, Branch Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Trended Income Statements

Progressive Executive- and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Trended Income Statements, along with income statement variance reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements, financial dashboards, budget models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report for Credit Unions

What is a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report for Credit Unions?

Reconciliation Reports are considered data control tools and are used by accountants to help ensure that loan-related transactions tie to the General Ledger. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that for any given GL account chosen by the user it will list and match with the related deposit transactions. In the columns you find months up to the current period to make it easy to track historical balances. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Deposit and GL Reconciliation Reports

Credit Unions use Deposit and GL Reconciliation Reports to automate and speed up the monthly close process and to ensure that data from deposit transactions match with the related GL postings. When used as part of good business practices in Accounting departments, a company can improve its accounting staff efficiency, and it can reduce the chances that mistakes carry through to financial reports.

Example of a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report

Here is an example of a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report with user-defined parameters for Entity and Account.

Example of a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report for Credit Unions

Example of a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report for Credit Unions

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Controllers and Accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Deposit and GL Reconciliation Reports

Progressive Accounting departments sometimes use several different Deposit and GL Reconciliation Reports, along with detailed deposit reports, trial balances, profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from loan management systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report for Credit Unions

What is a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report?

Reconciliation Reports are considered data control tools and are used by accountants to help ensure that loan-related transactions tie to the General Ledger. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it for any given GL account chosen by the user will list and match with the related loan transactions. In the columns you find months up to the current period in order to make it easy to track historical balances. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Loan and GL Reconciliation Reports

Credit Unions use Loan and GL Reconciliation Reports to automate and speed up the monthly close process and to ensure that data from loan transactions match with the related GL postings. When used as part of good business practices in Accounting departments, a company can improve its accounting staff efficiency, and it can reduce the chances that mistakes carry through to financial reports.

Example of a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report

Here is an example of a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report with user-defined parameters for Entity and Account.

Example of a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report for Credit Unions

Example of a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report for Credit Unions

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Controllers and Accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Loan and GL Reconciliation Reports

Progressive Accounting departments sometimes use several different Loan and GL Reconciliation Reports, along with Detailed loan reports, trial balances, profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from loan management systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report for Credit Unions

What is a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report?

Reconciliation Reports are considered monthly data control tools and are used by accountants to help ensure that securities-related transactions tie to the General Ledger. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it for any given GL account chosen by the user will list and match with the related securities transactions. Months up to the current period are listed across the column to track historical balances. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Securities and GL Reconciliation Reports

Credit Unions use Securities and GL Reconciliation Reports to automate and speed up the monthly close process and to ensure that data from sub-ledgers match with the related GL postings. When used as part of good business practices in Accounting departments, a company can improve its accounting staff efficiency, and it can reduce the chances that mistakes carry through to financial reports.

Example of a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report

Here is an example of a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report with user-defined parameters for Entity and Account as well as actual to budget comparisons.

Example of a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report for Credit Unions

Example of a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report for Credit Unions

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Controllers and Accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Securities and GL Reconciliation Reports

Progressive Accounting departments sometimes use several different Securities and GL Reconciliation Reports, along with profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements, KPI reports, budget models, forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples