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Blog header image showing a dashboard with financial report drill down for the Monthly Reporting Process Best Practices blog for Solver CPM



Subscription Revenue by Customer Report Example

What is a Subscription Revenue by Customer Report?

Subscription revenue reports with customer detail are considered customer reports and are often used by sales managers to analyze monthly sales and revenue per customer. Key functionality in this type of report shows monthly subscription revenue per customer. It also calculates average revenue per customer as well each customer’s % of the average. The figures and the column chart are ranked from high performer to low performer. You will find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Customer-Focused Subscription Revenue Reports

Companies and organizations use Customer-Focused Subscription Revenue Reports to track each customer’s contribution to the current month’s revenue. When used as part of good business practices in a sales department, a company can improve its ability to quickly spot top and bottom performers, as well as, reduce the chances that sales issues at the customer level go undetected.

Customer-Focused Subscription Revenue Report Example

Here is an example of a Subscription Revenue by Customer.

Subscription Revenue by Customer Report Example

Subscription Revenue by Customer Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here.

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Sales Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Customer-Focused Subscription Revenue Reports

Progressive Sales Departments sometimes use several different Customer-Focused Subscription Revenue Reports, along with subscription dashboards, detailed customer sales reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Binary Stream, Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Subscription Revenue by Product Report Example

What is a Subscription Revenue by Product Report?

Subscription revenue reports with product detail are considered analysis tools and are often used by product managers and sales executives to review product performance. Key functionality in this type of report shows monthly subscription revenue per item. It also calculates average revenue per item as well as each product’s % of the average. The figures and the column chart are ranked from high to low performer. You will find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Subscription Revenue by Product Reports

Companies and organizations use Subscription Revenue by Product reports to track each item’s revenue for the current month. When used as part of good business practices in a sales department, a company can improve its ability to quickly spot top and bottom performers as well as reduce the chances that sales issues at the item level go undetected.

Subscription Revenue by Product Example

Here is an example of a Subscription Revenue by Product.

Subscription Revenue by Product Report Example

Subscription Revenue by Product Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here.

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Product Managers, Sales Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Subscription Revenue by Product

Progressive Sales Departments sometimes use several different Subscription Revenue by Product, along with subscription dashboards, detailed product sales reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Recurring Revenue and Churn Analysis Report Example

What is a Recurring Revenue and Churn Analysis Report?

Recurring revenue and churn analysis reports are considered subscription management tools and are often used by sales managers and accountants to track important customer and contract metrics. Key functionality in this type of report tracks trends and variances for Monthly Recurring Revenue (MRR), new sales, upgrades, downgrades and churn. It also shows customer count at the beginning and end of the current period. Charts and traffic lights simplifies the analysis. You will find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Recurring Revenue and Churn Reports

Companies and organizations use Recurring Revenue and Churn Reports to keep a keen eye on how their MRR and the underlying drivers are trending. When used as part of good business practices in a sales and customer service department, a company can improve its managers’ ability to quickly track the performance of their subscription business, as well as, reduce the chances of losing valuable time if any opportunities or issues are discovered late.

Recurring Revenue and Churn Report Example

Here is an example of a Subscription Revenue Trend Report with MRR and churn analysis.

Recurring Revenue and Churn Analysis Report Example

Recurring Revenue and Churn Analysis Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here.

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Boards, Executive Teams, CFOs, Sales Managers, Customer Success Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Recurring Revenue and Churn Reports

Progressive Sales and Customer Service Departments sometimes use several different Recurring Revenue and Churn Reports, along with subscription dashboards, detailed customer billing reports, deferred revenue reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Binary Stream, Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Quarterly Trend Report for Subscription Revenue Example

What is a Quarterly Trend Report for Subscription Revenue?

Recurring revenue trend reports are considered key analysis tools and are often used by sales managers and executives to review multi-year growth trends for their subscription business. Key functionality in this type of report displays the past 8 quarters of recurring revenue by customer. Each quarterly column can be expanded to reveal the monthly detail behind it. The chart on top of the report shows the revenue trend by quarter.

Purpose of Multi-year Subscription Revenue Trend Reports

Companies and organizations use Multi-year Subscription Revenue Trend Reports to quickly get a big picture analysis of their recurring revenue by customer. When used as part of good business practices in a sales and customer service department, a company can improve its cash flow and related customer account planning, as well as, reduce the chances that managers low visibility to tracking individual customer contribution to revenue over time.

Multi-year Subscription Revenue Trend Report Example

Here is an example of an Eight Quarter Rolling Subscription Revenue trend report.

Quarterly Trend Report for Subscription Revenue Example

Quarterly Trend Report for Subscription Revenue Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here.

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Sales and Customer Service Managers, Account Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Multi-year Subscription Revenue Trend Reports

Progressive sales and customer service Departments sometimes use several different Multi-year Subscription Revenue Trend Reports, along with subscription dashboards, detailed customer billing reports, deferred revenue reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Binary Stream, Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Subscription Revenue Trend by Customer Report Example

What is a Subscription Revenue Trend by Customer Report?

Subscription revenue trend reports are considered essential for recurring revenue analysis and are often used by sales managers and accountants to review past or future monthly recurring revenue (MRR). Key functionality in this type of report shows selected customers in the rows and the MRR in the columns. In the example seen below, the Total column expands to display the past 48 individual months of MRR. The report can be run for any future or past month and will automatically present the prior 48 periods.

Purpose of Subscription Revenue Trend Reports

Companies and organizations use Subscription Revenue Trend Reports to easily see the month-by-month trend in MRR with customer detail. When used as part of good business practices in a sales and customer service department, a company can improve its cash flow planning, as well as, reduce the chances that managers have low visibility to individual customer contributions to MRR.

Subscription Revenue Trend Report Example

Here is an example of a Subscription Revenue Trend Report with a Total column that expands to see the 48 months of MRR by customer.

Subscription Revenue Trend by Customer Report Example

Subscription Revenue Trend by Customer Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here.

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Sales and Customer Service Managers, Account Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Subscription Revenue Trend Reports

Progressive Sales and Customer Service Departments sometimes use several different Subscription Revenue Trend Reports, along with subscription dashboards, detailed customer billing reports, deferred revenue reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Binary Stream, Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Budgeting_Process_Best_Practices_White_Paper_Solver
Blog header image showing a woman with binoculars for the Solver blog on how to use monthly rolling forecasts to gain insight in unpredictable times

According to the 2020 Wisdom of Crowds Enterprise Performance Management Market Study, adoption of enterprise management software increased in 2020. Nearly half of all surveyed organizations now use enterprise performance management (EPM) / corporate performance management (CPM) software, and 78% of survey respondents rated this software as “critical,” “very important,” or “important” to their organization.

Of course, enterprise and corporate performance management software is always useful for Finance and Operations planning, especially during the annual budgeting process, but in a time of economic uncertainty, the budgets that your organization created 12-18 months ago can seem stale and out of date.

Flexible monthly rolling forecasts, which are almost exclusively found in market-leading EPM / CPM software, help keep your Finance and Operations planning fresh and on track throughout unpredictable times, so you can enhance your budgeting agility and maintain your competitive edge.

View templates for forecasting and other critical planning processes.

Why Use Monthly Rolling Forecasts?

“Enterprise performance management software can help organizations manage short-term uncertainty and plan their strategies for the ‘new normal’…” – 2020 Wisdom of Crowds EPM Market Study

Rolling forecasts empower business leaders to continuously plan for the future with insight into the next 12-18 months. Using up-to-date historical data, rolling forecasts can help cultivate more agile organizational planning that helps illuminate how short-term disruptions and adjustments may affect long-term objectives.

In essence, monthly rolling forecasts help companies plan their strategy to overcome economic uncertainty by providing a continuously updating glimpse into the potential future.

Compared to the typical annual budgeting process — which relies heavily on assumptions generated in the past and marches steadily into an unknown future somewhere past the “fiscal cliff” — it is clear why rolling forecasts are critical to success in uncertain times.

Rolling Forecast Usage Is Likely to Increase Due to the Events of 2020

The Wisdom of Crowds study reports that 64% of respondents use rolling forecasts today, and 16% say they have now replaced annual budgets with rolling forecasts (an increase of ~15% YoY). Considering the ongoing disruption caused by COVID and global economic uncertainty, the adoption of monthly rolling forecasts is likely to increase more in 2020.

Would rolling forecasts be right for your organization? Here are a few reasons to consider utilizing this critical tool as a budget manager or executive:

  • Monthly rolling forecasts deliver timely insight based on the recent past.

When you planned your 2020 budget, no one had heard of a coronavirus – and you certainly did not expect a coronavirus to shrink the GDP, disrupt global supply chains, or quarantine your workforce in home offices. It is time to recalibrate your numbers.

Now that all this has happened, a monthly rolling forecast can help you strategize what to do next, whereas that annual budget will offer little to no help.

  • Rolling forecasts can report on current usage of allocated budgets.

Considering the myriad changes listed above, there is a high probability that your company expenditures have strayed significantly from expectations. For example, your company has probably spent less on conferences and travel. Can you re-allocate those budgets?

Department managers may be hesitant to initiate a conversation with you about the amounts still available in their allocated budgets, but a monthly rolling forecast can shine light onto usage (or lack thereof), so you can plan properly.

Why Not Use Rolling Forecast Tools Built into Your ERP System?

If you are running cloud ERP systems like Microsoft Dynamics 365 Finance, your company has a great accounting system. So, why not use the rolling forecast tools built into your ERP system? Simply put, there aren’t many available. That is why more than 90% of the organizations create their forecast models outside their ERP in manual Excel spreadsheet models.

Now, if it fills your needs, there is cash-flow forecasting and sales forecasting included with some ERP systems, including Dynamics 365 Finance implementations, but no forecasting is available on Government Community Cloud (GCC). If you are a Government agency or you want to use rolling forecasts for a wide variety of Operations and Finance areas, it is a smart idea to invest in a purpose-built, flexible and robust market-leading corporate performance management solution that can provide you with the in-depth insight you need immediately.

Next year’s annual budgeting process is here now, yet leaders across the globe still have few answers or concrete plans to address our uncertain future. The best way for you to plan your organization’s budget is to develop your own glimpse into the future… and the best way to do that is with monthly rolling forecasts.

Make Smarter Decisions Now Using Monthly Rolling Forecasts from Solver

With the current situation, you cannot wait to “see what happens.” Forecasting templates from Solver help you get started with this helpful tool quickly, so you can take a proactive role in your Finance and Operations planning processes.

Rolling forecasts from Solver are fully integrated with a number of ERP systems, including Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central and Microsoft Dynamics 365 Finance (f/k/a Microsoft Dynamics 365 Finance & Operations), and they provide an easy way for you to look forward into what you can expect next year, so you can plan appropriately.

 

Discover the facts on forecasting during economic uncertainty with this handy how-to from Solver.  

liquidityriskanalysis

Nobody likes a budget that is far off target, especially when it could result in a liquidity crisis. Luckily, most companies rarely have to experience such a stressful event. Although, in a turbulent economy where interest rates and stock indexes move up and down like yo-yos and news about corporate layoffs are part of daily news headlines, strong financial clarity does not seem like a bad idea.

So, what does a cash flow forecast mean to most people?

Here is a definition: A cash flow forecast is a plan that shows how much money a business expects to receive in, and pay out, over a given period of time. 

Based on the definition above, it seems logical that all businesses should have a cash flow forecast perfectly ingrained in their corporate processes, but is that the reality? Let’s take a closer look at this.

What are Cash Flow Budgets? 

Cash flow budgets are a set of elements.  In particular, capital requirements, cost of goods, development expenses, operating expenses, and sales and revenue are all highlighted by a cash flow budget.  And like every other quality budget, your cash flow projections rely on past performance data.  In order to forecast your cash flow, you will begin by looking at your estimated sales for the next year, related to the percentage of business volume produced monthly.  You’ll divide each month’s sales by cash and credit sales. 

Your cash sales can be recorded in the cash flow report in the same month they’re generated.  As for your credit sales, they are not credit card sales that are treated as cash, but instead, they have invoiced sales with agreed-upon terms.  Therefore, you will want to look at your AR (accounts receivable) records and figure out your typical collection period.  You won’t be able to log your credit sales as cash until 5-10 days after the period ends because you are waiting on another bank to receive payment.

Next up is other income.  More specifically, the next line item on a cash flow statement is the revenue you get from investments, interest accrued on loans that have been extended, and liquidating any assets.  The sum of cash sales, receivables, and other income is your total income.  In your first month of cash flow budgeting, it will typically be comprised of cash sales, other income, and any receivables from the previous budget that have matured to a collection point during the first month of the current budget.

Are All Businesses Doing Cash Flow Forecasting?

As much as it seems to make perfect sense to have a good estimate of your future cash outflows and inflows, many companies never get around to doing it. This is especially true in small and mid-sized businesses. Some of the reasons for the lack of cash flow forecasting models are the following:

  • The finance staff don’t have time to prepare it
  • Lack of tools that automate cash flow forecasting
  • Complexity in creating a good cash flow model
  • Lack of accuracy in past models leading to reduced appetite to repeat it
  • Other business tasks or fires keep executives focused in other areas
  • The financial planning team is exhausted after then annual budget process with no time or motivation to re-forecast the budget during the year

Regardless of the reason for not doing a cash flow forecast, healthy cash flow is the lifeblood of all businesses, so there is no lack of motivation.

Let’s look at the potential benefits of accurate cash flow forecasting.

Why Do Companies Want to Project Their Future Cash Outflows and Inflows?

Most executives know they would sleep better at night if they had a mechanism that fairly accurately could tell them if the liquidity of their business is healthy or not in the months ahead.

Below is an example of a report using simple color indicators and charts to help managers analyze the company’s projected cash position based on underlying cash flow forecast.

liquidity risk analysis

There are several very logical reasons why a company can benefit from regular cash flow forecasts, including:

  1. Reduce the risk of insolvency – by having a clear idea of any upcoming liquidity issues, management can react early and avoid drama and stress
  2. Move faster on investment opportunities – if you, thanks to a cash flow forecast, early on know that the business will be flush with cash in the months ahead, you can start planning acquisitions, down payment of high interest debt, purchases of strategic capital assets, etc.
  3. Satisfy bankers to enable debt financing or other bank-backed financial transactions

In other words, solid cash flow forecasts can be of tremendous value to a management team. However, if many financial teams dread the additional work of doing planning and performing a cash flow analysis, how can companies still get it done?

How to Automate Cash Flow Forecasts?

As in many other cases, technology can help automate laborious tasks. In the case of cash flow forecasting, there is a cloud software category often referred to as Corporate Performance Management (CPM) solutions that includes vendors such as Adaptive Insights, Centage and Solver that specialize in planning, budgeting and forecasting.

Benefits of CPM tools include scenario forecasting to predict “great”, “good” and “bad” scenarios so managers can plan accordingly. In other cases, CPM solutions provide entire driver-based forecast processes. Driver-based means that the forecast includes assumptions that help automate and simplify creation of sales, payroll, expenses, balance sheet and cash flow forecasts.

Sometimes managers don’t have the time or the need for a full forecast to analyze projected liquidity, in which case they can use simulation models to quickly adjust elements of their cash outflows and inflows to see the impact on the cash position as seen in this example:

cashflowanalysis

Most executives would agree that accurate cash flow forecasts provide numerous benefits to their business. During economic turmoil cash flow forecasts can help lower the risk of running into liquidity problems and increasing the chance to be ready to jump on investment opportunities. Regardless of the motivation, there are good tools available to help automate and simplify such financial planning processes.

At Solver, we offer Corporate Performance Management Solutions that help you establish cash flow forecasts and analyses and prepare for uncertain times. Contact one of our expert team members to learn how we can help you improve your cash flow processes.

Contact Us Today

financial planning analysis blog

The rapid growth of Microsoft’s Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC) cloud ERP system comes with investments in add-on app solutions by independent software vendors (ISVs)For example, Progressus is a company as described above and has a project solution for D365 BC. With Progressus, small and mid-sized companies receive easy-to-configure and advanced project accounting functionality in the cloud. 

However, as all project-centric business managers know, good transactional systems also need proper financial planning and analysis tools. In today’s highly competitive market, this can be the difference between success and failure.  As successful project-based companies invest in new cloud-based ERP systems like D365 BC and add advanced project apps like Progressus, a natural next step after the implementation is to look for an integrated and flexible reporting and planning solutionA reporting and planning software like Solver can operate down to the detailed field and dimension level in the Progressus tables inside the ERP system.  

Project Reports for D365 and the Progressus App

Lately, most companies prefer pre-integrated solutions. Due to this, Solver partnered with Progressus and now the corporate performance management solution delivers an out-of-the box integration to both Dynamics 365 Business Central and Progressus. Solver not only provides D365 BC customers with a strong financial reporting and budgeting software for general ledger and sub-ledger data, but it also now extends this functionality into all the project detail provided by Progressus. 

Customer Benefits:

  • Pre-built integration to Dynamics 365 and Progressus tables
  • Pre-built Progressus Project reports
  • Full report writer with Excel design
  • Optional Budgeting module
  • Multi-tenant Azure Cloud Platform
  • Pre-built Power BI integration for interactive Dashboards

However, as with any reporting solution, pre-built report templates speed up deployment when can be used as a starting point. 

Solver offers a number of project-focused reports for Progressus including:  

  • Benchmarking
  • Project Manager Benchmarking
  • Project Capacity by
    • Customer Group and Resource
    • Department and Resource
    • Customer Group and Resource
  • Project Detail by Customer
  • Project List
  • Resource Detail
  • Actual vs Budget Variance

 

project capacity

project 2

Both solutions are independently integrated to Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central. After the partnership between the two companies, they decided to configure a joint integration. With the rapid growth in popularity of cloud ERP software like D365 BC, one of the next big cloud drivers is that ISVs, such as Progressus and Solver, work together to give customers elegant integrations across both standard ERP data as well as transactions originating from ISV add-ins to the ERP systems. This eliminates many of the custom integrations that are configured in the old on-premise platforms.

Technology is driving major industry changes into the next decade. Project managers and executives will need and demand complete insight to their data to drive faster and better decisions. Cloud-based ERP vendors and ISVs are making good strides to make this happen!