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Example of a Sales and Inventory Dashboard for Real Estate Companies

What is a Sales and Inventory Dashboard?

Sales and Inventory Dashboards are considered analysis tools and are often used by executives and sales leaders to track and compare sales and available stock of properties across regions. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides four analytical perspectives with real estate KPIs, including: 1) Monthly metrics by state with measures for: Available stock (inventory), Sold units year-to-date (YTD), monthly average sales velocity (speed”), Months of inventory, 2) Available inventory ranked by state, 3) Sold units by state, and 4) Monthly average sales velocity (“speed”) by state. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Real Estate Sales and Inventory Dashboards

Real Estate companies use Sales and Inventory Dashboards to give managers a clear monthly picture of regional sales versus the available stock of properties. When used as part of good business practices in Sales and Financial Planning and Analysis (FP&A) departments, a company can improve its sales and marketing strategies, and it can reduce the chances that revenues are sub-optimized because of lack of real time insight to property inventory versus sales comparisons.

Example of a Sales and Inventory Dashboard

Here is an example of a Sales and Inventory Dashboard with regional comparisons and KPIs.

Example of a Sales and Inventory Dashboard for Real Estate Companies

Example of a Sales and Inventory Dashboard for Real Estate Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Sales Executives, CFOs, budget managers and executives.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Sales and Inventory Dashboards

Progressive Sales and Financial Planning and Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Sales and Inventory Dashboards, along with sales reports, property inventory reports, KPI dashboards, financial statements, annual budget models, sales forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of an Inventory Analysis Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies

What is an Inventory Analysis Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies?

Inventory Dashboards are considered operational analysis tools and are used by COO’s, production managers, and inventory managers to monitor monthly inventory changes. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it offer analysis from four different perspectives, including: 1) Change in inventory value per month, year and item category, 2) Annual change in inventory value compared to prior year, 3) Monthly trend in inventory value versus last year, and 4) Monthly figures for available quantity, sold quantity, net stock quantity (backlog) and percent. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Inventory Analysis Dashboards

Manufacturing companies use Inventory Analysis Dashboards to give managers an important big picture view of changes in inventory and monthly trends. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and operations departments, an organization can improve its strategies as it relates to production volumes, inventory, sales and pricing, and it can reduce the chances that the business runs into regular inventory-related problems.

Example of a Inventory Analysis Dashboard

Here is an example of a Inventory Analysis Dashboard with trends, quantity and value metrics. You can also try the interactive version of this dashboard example here (use the <> buttons on the bottom of the dashboard to navigate to page 4 to see the Inventory example).

Example of an Inventory Analysis Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies

Example of an Inventory Analysis Dashboard for Manufacturing Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: COOs, inventory managers, sales managers, purchasing managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Inventory Analysis Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and operations departments sometimes use several different Inventory Analysis Dashboards, along with inventory reports, sales forecasts, production plans, sales dashboards, backlog reports, open order reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Learn More About Solver CPM For Manufacturing

Example of an Inventory Analysis Dashboard for Distributors

What is a Inventory Analysis Dashboard?

Inventory Dashboards are considered operational analysis tools and are used by finance teams and inventory managers to analyze inventory KPIs. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides a big picture view of essential metrics such as: 1) Order cycle time, 2) Inventory value by product/category, 3) Inventory trend, 4) Inventory efficiency ratio, and 6) Order accuracy trend. The filters seen on the top right of the dashboard enable drill down into individual warehouse locations and periods. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Automate your financial analysis and reporting

Purpose of Inventory Analysis Dashboards

Distributors use Inventory Analysis Dashboards to give managers an easy and powerful way to monitor  the inventory KPIs that matters most to them. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, an organization can improve and speed up its product purchasing- and inventory planning strategies, and it can reduce the chances that money is lost due to poor tracking of key trends and exceptions.

Inventory Dashboards Example

Here is an example of a Inventory Analysis Dashboard with trends and value metrics.

Example of an Inventory Analysis Dashboard for Distributors

Example of an Inventory Analysis Dashboard for Distributors

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Finance officers, analysts, inventory managers, purchasing managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Inventory Analysis Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Inventory dashboards, along with sales forecasts, detailed inventory reports, sales dashboards, purchasing reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Automate your financial analysis and reporting

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of an Inventory Analysis Report with Drill Down to Sales Orders

What is an Inventory Analysis Report with Drill Down to Sales Orders?

Inventory Analysis Report with links to sales orders are considered inventory optimization tools and are used by purchasing and inventory managers to carefully watch inventory levels and related orders from customers. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it is parameter-based and the user can run it with a variety of filters to see exactly the data they are looking for. The report can also be scheduled to automatically run with email distribution or for display on e.g. a monitor. It shows key data like: Inventory value, Quantity on hand, Customer orders, Quantity available, Min/Max levels with red color for low alert and green for ok, Inventory minimum notification level, and 30 day forecast. These metrics are shown by supplier, Item class Item, and distribution center. One of the the key valuable features of the report is that the user can drill down on any Customer Order figure and see the details of the underlying sales orders. This should be easy, convenient and a time saver for the user. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Inventory Analysis Reports with Drill-down to Sales Orders

Distribution businesses use Inventory Analysis Reports with Drill-down to Sales Orders to optimize and speed up inventory decisions. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A), warehousing, purchasing and sales departments, a company can improve its revenues, reduce carrying costs and increase profits, and it can reduce the chances that managers sub-optimize profits due to poor visibility into supply and demand.

Inventory Analysis Report Example

Here is an example of an Inventory Analysis Report with alerts and direct drill down to underlying sales orders.

Example of an Inventory Analysis Report with Drill Down to Sales Orders

Example of an Inventory Analysis Report with Drill Down to Sales Orders

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Sales executives, inventory managers, purchasing managers and analysts.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Inventory Analysis Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A), warehousing, purchasing and sales departments sometimes use several different inventory  reports, along with  sales transaction reports, inventory dashboards, sales forecasts, sales budgets, supplier rating reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of an Executive Dashboard for a Distribution Company

What is an Executive Dashboard for a Distribution Company?

Executive dashboards are considered important analysis tools and are used by upper management to review overall performance as it relates to sales and inventory key performance indicators (KPIs). Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it combines four KPI charts with a report section. The charts covers: 1) Inventory turnover by distribution center, 2) Inventory turnover trend by month, 3) Top 10 customers based on sales, and 4) Top 10 best-selling products. The report section at the bottom of the charts contains the related metrics in a table format. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Executive Dashboards for Distributors

Distribution businesses use Executive Dashboards to provide self-service analysis that enables quick and easy monitoring of sales and inventory metrics. When used as part of good business practices in an executive department, a company can improve the speed and agility of decisions and it can reduce the chances that executives lack important insight between formal corporate meetings.

Executive Dashboards Example

Here is an example of an Executive Dashboard with sales and inventory KPIs.

Example of an Executive Dashboard for a Distribution Company

Example of an Executive Dashboard for a Distribution Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: CEOs, COOs, CFOs.

Other Dashboards Often Used in Conjunction with Executive Dashboards for Distributors

Progressive executive department sometimes use several different Executive Dashboards, along with general sales dashboards, inventory reports, profit & loss reports, cash flow statements, balance sheets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Product Dashboard for a Retail Company

What is a Product Dashboard for a Retail Company?

Product dashboards are considered operational reports and are used by product managers and store managers to analyze trends and budget variances. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it has seven different KPI charts. These include: Sales and gross margin by product class, monthly sales and gross margin trend, top and bottom products, and product inventory. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Product Dashboards

Retail businesses use Product Dashboards to provide managers with an easy, self-service solution to monitor product performance. When used as part of good business practices in retail operations, a company can improve its inventory, marketing and sales decisions as well as reduce the chances that to product performance goes under the radar for managers.

Product Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Product Dashboard with budget variances and trend analysis.

Example of a Product Dashboard for a Retail Company

Example of a Product Dashboard for a Retail Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Product managers, store and regional managers.

Other Dashboards Often Used in Conjunction with Product Dashboards

Progressive retail operations departments sometimes use several different Product Dashboards, along with general sales forecasts and budgets, sales dashboards, inventory reports, profit & loss reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Materials Cost Analysis Report Example for a Manufacturing Plant

What is a Materials Cost Analysis Report?

Materials cost reports are considered production analysis tools and are used by production- and plant managers to analyze monthly trends in the various material costs involved in their manufacturing process. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard report is that it is parameter driven and has charts on the top of the report and figures below that (not visible in screenshot below). There are four KPI charts, each with monthly cost trends: 1) Raw materials inventory trend, 2) Intermediate inventory trend, 3) Work in progress trend, and 4) Finished goods trend. You find an example of this type of dashboard report below.

Purpose of Materials Cost Reports

Manufacturers use Materials Cost Reports to easily monitor trends in the costs going into product manufacturing. When used as part of good business practices in a Production department, an organization can improve its production efficiency and data collection as well as reduce the chances that lack of benchmarking and analysis lead to competitive disadvantages.

Materials Cost Report Example

Here is an example of a Materials Cost Report with monthly trend charts for raw materials, inventory, WIP and finished goods.

Materials Cost Analysis Report Example for a Manufacturing Plant

Materials Cost Analysis Report Example for a Manufacturing Plant

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard report?

The typical users of this type of dashboard report are: Production  managers, product managers.

Other reports Often Used in Conjunction with Materials Cost Reports

Progressive Production departments sometimes use several different Materials Cost Reports, along with production dashboards, inventory reports, costing reports, benchmark dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Learn More About Solver CPM For Manufacturing

Example of an Executive Dashboard for a Manufacturing Business

What is an Executive Dashboard for a Manufacturing Business?

Executive Dashboards are considered management monitoring tools and are often used by manufacturing leaders to keep an eye on key performance metrics. Special functionality in this type of dashboard report is parameter driven and can be viewed for any month and plant facility. The charts show revenue and cost of goods sold (COS) trends and comparison to budgets. The dashboard also shows sales by customer and product, as well as, top suppliers based on purchases. Finally, it tracks inventory by distribution center. You will find an example of this type of dashboard report below.

Purpose of Executive Manufacturing Dashboards

Manufacturing companies use Executive Dashboards to provide top managers with an easy way to monitor KPIs and trends in a self-service, web interface that they can access from anywhere. When used as part of good business practices in an executive department, a company can improve its reaction time and speed of decision-making, as well as, reduce the chances that important metrics go undetected for weeks or even months.

Executive Manufacturing Dashboard Example

Here is an example of an Executive Dashboard for a manufacturing business.

Example of an Executive Dashboard for a Manufacturing Business

Example of an Executive Dashboard for a Manufacturing Business

You can find hundreds of additional examples here.

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard Report?

The typical users of this type of dashboard report are: CEOs, COOs, CFOs and Board Members.

Other Dashboard Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Executive Manufacturing Dashboards

Progressive Executive Departments sometimes use several different Executive Manufacturing Dashboards, along with profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Learn More About Solver CPM For Manufacturing

Work Order Management Report for Manufacturing Plants Example

What is a Work Order Management Report for Manufacturing Plants?

Work Order Management reports are considered essential production planning reports and are often used by production managers to determine the priority and sequence of the products they manufacture. Key functionality in this type of report shows work orders by plant, customer and item. It also displays production sequence, inventory and capacity statuses. You will find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Work Order Management Reports

Manufacturing plants use Work Order Management Reports to manage manufacturing priorities. When used as part of good business practices in a Production department, a company can improve its ability to meet customer orders in a timely manner, as well as, reduce the chances that line managers don’t see an upcoming issue related to inventory shortage or manufacturing capacity.

Work Order Management Report Example

Here is an example of detailed Work Order Management report.

Work Order Management Report for Manufacturing Plants Example

Work Order Management Report for Manufacturing Plants Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here.

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Production and Fulfillment Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Work Order Management Reports

Progressive Production Departments sometimes use several different Work Order Management Reports, along with production dashboards, inventory reports, sales forecast, sales reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Learn More About Solver CPM For Manufacturing

Open Orders by Item Report for Manufacturing Plants Example

What is an Open Orders by Item Report for Manufacturing Plants?

Open Orders Reports are considered operational reports and are often used by production and plant managers to determine the plant’s ability to fulfill customer orders. Key functionality in this type of report shows actual, production forecast and variance down the rows and key order metrics across the columns. Each report section covers one item (product). Metrics include quantity on hand, customer orders, quantity available, backlog quantity, and quality. You will find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Open Order Reports

Manufacturing plants use Open Order Reports to quickly gauge the plant’s ability to satisfy customer demand, as well as, plan production and delivery times based on backlog. When used as part of good business practices in a Production department, a company can improve its manufacturing forecast and inventory planning, as well as, reduce the chances that major backlogs impact customer satisfaction issues and sub-optimal revenues.

Open Order Report Example

Here is an example of a modern Open Orders report by Item.

Open Orders by Item Report for Manufacturing Plants Example

Open Orders by Item Report for Manufacturing Plants Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here.

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: COOs, plant and production managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Open Order Reports

Progressive Production Departments sometimes use several different Open Order Reports, along with production dashboards, inventory reports, sales forecast, sales reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Learn More About Solver CPM For Manufacturing