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Example of an Automated Narrative for a Nonprofit Financial Statement

What is a Automated Narrative for Nonprofit Financial Statements?

Financial statements with automated narratives are considered modern analysis tools and are used by Board members, CFOs as well as other users and accountants to get an always concise, up-to-date and easy-to-read financial status. Some of the key functionality in this type of combined financial and narrative report is that it typically provides two pages (see tabs at bottom of the image). The first page is an automatically generated narrative that pulls the most essential metrics from the second page, which is an ordinary financial report. You find an example of this type of combined financial and narrative below.

Purpose of Auto-narrative Reports

Nonprofits and associations use Auto-narrative Reports to provide highly user-friendly financial updates to managers outside of the accounting department. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, an organization can improve its financial literacy and manager engagement as well as reduce the chances that few people outside of accounting follow and comments on financial performance.

Auto-narrative Report Example

Here is an example of an Automated Narrative Report for a Nonprofit Financial Statement.

Example of an Automated Narrative for a Nonprofit Financial Statement

Example of an Automated Narrative for a Nonprofit Financial Statement

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Combined financial and narrative?

The typical users of this type of combined financial and narrative are: Executives, department heads, board members.

Other Combined financial and narratives Often Used in Conjunction with Auto-narrative Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Auto-narrative Reports, along with balance sheets, statement of activities, statement of cash flows, financial dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Statement of Activities Report Example for a Nonprofit Organization

What is a Statement of Activities for a Nonprofit Organization?

Statement of activities reports are considered highly important financial statements and are used by executives and accountants to perform monthly financial analysis. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it is parameter driven and can be run for a month and across one or multiple organizational units. The report details revenues and expenses by account. Rows can be expanded by the user to see the individual accounts. The columns provide current period, last year and budget comparisons and variances. The traffic lights helps highlight good and bad variances. The year-to-date (YTD) columns can also be expanded to see the individual months that make up the YTD amounts. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Statement of Activities Reports

Nonprofits and associations use Statement of Activities Reports to give executives and department heads an easy to read monthly financial review. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, an organization can improve its analysis and related decision-making as well as reduce the chances that managers lose sight of important variances and trends.

Statement of Activities Report Example

Here is an example of a Statement of Activities report with dynamic, expandable rows and columns.

Statement of Activities Report Example for a Nonprofit Organization

Statement of Activities Report Example for a Nonprofit Organization

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Executives, boards, department heads, accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Statement of Activities Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Statement of Activities Reports, along with balance sheets, cash flow statements, financial dashboards, budget and forecast models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Profit & Loss Report Example with Automated Full Year Estimate

What is a Profit & Loss Report with Automated Full Year Estimate?

Profit & Loss (P&L) estimate reports are considered important decision-making tools and are often used by CFOs and analysts to, on a monthly basis, get an automatic forecast for the full year. Some of the key functionality in this type of monthly estimate report is that it provides all-in-one analysis with graphics, narrative and a trended P&L report. The top of the report shows trend charts for Revenue, Gross Profit and Operating Income. Each chart contains data series for actual and budget for the current year and actual last year. The main section of the report displays actual for each month up to the current period and then dynamically pulls in budgets for the rest of the year to give a full year estimate. You find an example of this type of monthly estimate report below.

Purpose of Profit & Loss Estimate Reports

Companies and organizations use Profit & Loss Estimate Reports to get a continuous outlook for the full year. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its decision-making as well as reduce the chances that managers only look in the rear view mirror or analyze variances based in old, stale budgets.

Profit & Loss Estimate Report Example

Here is an example of a Profit & Loss Report with charts and automated full year estimate.

Profit & Loss Report Example with Automated Full Year Estimate

Profit & Loss Report Example with Automated Full Year Estimate

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Monthly estimate report?

The typical users of this type of monthly estimate report are: CFOs, Analysts and Executives.

Other Monthly estimate reports Often Used in Conjunction with Profit & Loss Estimate Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Profit & Loss Estimate Reports, along with monthly variance reports, KPI dashboards, trended balance sheets and cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Profit & Loss Report Example with Trend Analysis

What is a Profit & Loss Report with Trend Analysis?

Trended Profit & Loss (P&L) reports are considered important management tools and are often used by CFOs and analysts to track year-over-year revenue, expense and profit trends. Some of the key functionality in this type of visual financial report is that it provides deep analysis with three different sections: 1) Trend charts, 2) Automated narrative (yellow row in the example), 3) P&L content where the user can drill down to transaction detail. You find an example of this type of visual financial report below.

Purpose of Trended Profit & Loss Reports

Companies and organizations use Trended Profit & Loss Reports to easily detect and analyze swings in key revenue and expense figures for the current and prior years. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its decision-making as well as reduce the chances that managers miss important anomalies.

Trended Profit & Loss Report Example

Here is an example of a Trended Profit & Loss Report with charts and automated narrative.

P&L – Trend Analysis vs Prior Year

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Visual financial report?

The typical users of this type of visual financial report are: CFOs, Analysts and Executives.

Other Visual financial reports Often Used in Conjunction with Trended Profit & Loss Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Trended Profit & Loss Reports, along with monthly variance reports, KPI dashboards, trended balance sheets and cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

13 Month Rolling Profit & Loss Report Example

What is a 13 Month Rolling Profit & Loss Report?

Multi-month Rolling Profit & Loss reports are considered trend analysis tools and are often used by CFOs and analysts to look for significant upward or downwards trends in profitability. Some of the key functionality in this type of visual trend report is that it is parameter driven and based on the period the user runs it for, it will dynamically display the past thirteen months across the columns. The chart on the top of the report makes it easy to detect trends in Revenue, Gross Profit and Net Profit. The text in the yellow row below the chart provides an automatically generated narrative of essential information in the report. You find an example of this type of visual trend report below.

Purpose of 13 Month Profit & Loss Trend Reports

Companies and organizations use 13 Month Profit & Loss Trend Reports to easily track key P&L metrics backwards in time, including comparison to the same period in the prior year. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its reaction time to make decisions as well as reduce the chances that managers miss important trends and anomalies.

13 Month Profit & Loss Trend Report Example

Here is an example of a Trended 13 Month Profit & Loss Report with graphical analysis.

13 Month Rolling Profit & Loss Report Example

13 Month Rolling Profit & Loss Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Visual trend report?

The typical users of this type of visual trend report are: CFOs, Analysts and Executives.

Other Visual trend reports Often Used in Conjunction with 13 Month Profit & Loss Trend Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Month Profit & Loss Trend Reports, along with monthly variance reports, KPI dashboards, trended balance sheets and cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Monthly Profit & Loss Variance Report Example

What is a Monthly Profit & Loss Variance Report?

Profit & Loss (P&L) variance reports are considered essential monthly financial analysis tools and are most often used by financial managers to analyze revenues, expenses and profitability across the business. Some of the key functionality in this type of visual P&L report is that it is parameter driven and enhances analysis with its three different sections. On top of the report, the user can quickly analyze actual versus budget for Revenue, Gross Margin and Profit. The yellow row below the charts is an automatically generated sentence highlighting the current month’s performance. The main portion of the report is a modern P&L layout with variance analysis for current month, year-to-date (YTD) and last year. You find an example of this type of visual P&L report below.

Purpose of Monthly P&L Variance Reports

Companies and organizations use Monthly P&L Variance Reports to closely monitor revenues, expenses and profitability against stated goals as well as prior year. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its financial analysis capabilities as well as reduce the chances that poor variance insights leads to slow decision-making.

Monthly P&L Variance Report Example

Here is an example of a Monthly Profit & Loss Variance Report with charts and automated narrative.

Monthly Profit & Loss Variance Report Example

Monthly Profit & Loss Variance Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Visual P&L report?

The typical users of this type of visual P&L report are: Board Members, Executives, CFOs, Analysts, Accountants.

Other Visual P&L reports Often Used in Conjunction with Monthly P&L Variance Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Monthly P&L Variance Reports, along with KPI dashboards, revenue and sales reports, balance sheet and cash flow reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Consolidating Profit & Loss Report for a Retail Company

What is a Consolidating Profit & Loss Report for a Retail Company?

Consolidation reports are considered essential financial statements and are often used by accountants and controllers to show financial performance for individual stores and consolidated for the company. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it dynamically lists selected stores or regions across the columns with a consolidated total. The charts on the top of the reports provides easy comparisons. The report can be produced both for actual data as well as budgets and forecasts. The rows show a typical revenue and expense layout for a retail P&L report. The user can drill down on any figure to see the underlying detail. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Consolidating Profit & Loss Reports

Retail companies use Consolidating Profit & Loss Reports to give corporate managers a quick and easy monthly snapshot of profitability across all retail locations as well as in total. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its performance analysis and speed up decision-making as well as reduce the chances that weak profitability goes undetected for a longer time than necessary.

Consolidating Retail Profit & Loss Report Example

Here is an example of a Consolidating Profit & Loss Report with store locations across the columns.

Example of a Consolidating Profit & Loss Report for a Retail Company

Example of a Consolidating Profit & Loss Report for a Retail Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Corporate executives, controllers, store managers, regional managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Consolidating Profit & Loss Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Consolidating Profit & Loss Reports, along with sales forecasts and budgets, balance sheets, cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Profitability Dashboard Example

What is a Profitability Dashboard?

Profit-focused dashboards are considered financial visualization tools and are often used by executives and board members to analyze budget variances and trends related to profitability. Key functionality in this type of dashboard displays column charts to compare actual gross and net profit to budget and last year. The matrix on the top right shows all the key components that drive profitability both for the month and year-to-date. The two charts at the bottom displays year-to-date profit trends. Using the filters on the left side, the user can quickly select options to consolidate one or multiple companies, as well as, change periods. You will find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Profitability Dashboards

Companies and organizations use Profitability Dashboards to give executives a quick and easy way to analyze gross margin and net profit metrics. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its executives’ ability to always keep an eye on these essential KPIs, as well as, reduce the chances that important decisions are delayed because executives don’t have easy, self-service insight to performance.

Profitability Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Profitability Dashboard with interactive charts and figures.

Profitability Dashboard Example

Profitability Dashboard Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here.

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, board members and financial managers.

Other Dashboards Often Used in Conjunction with Profitability Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Profitability Dashboards, along with operational dashboards, detailed financial reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Departmental Allocation Report Example

What is a Departmental Allocation Report?

Allocation reports are considered financial tools and are often used by accountants to estimate profitability for revenue-generating departments after the distribution of overhead expenses to their financials. Key functionality in this type of allocation tool automatically calculates overhead amounts to be allocated from administrative to revenue generating departments. Any number of allocation methods can be used. In the example below, the allocations were performed based on headcount and square feet. You will find an example of this type of allocation tool below.

Purpose of Departmental Allocation Reports

Companies and organizations use Departmental Allocation Reports to get full visibility into the true profitability of their revenue-generating departments. When used as part of good business practices in a Finance and Accounting department, a company can improve its profit center analysis, as well as, reduce the chances that managers overstate profitability of departments that consume a lot of overhead services from other business units.

Departmental Allocation Report Example

Here is an example of a fully automated Allocation Report that calculates and stores allocated expenses by department.

Departmental Allocation Report Example

Departmental Allocation Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here.

Who Uses This Type of Allocation Tool?

The typical users of this type of allocation tool are: CFOs and Department Managers.

Other Allocation Tools Often Used in Conjunction with Departmental Allocation Reports

Progressive Finance and Accounting Departments sometimes use several different Departmental Allocation Reports, along with profit & loss reports, dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Trended Profit & Loss Report for Current versus Last Year Example

What is a Trended Profit & Loss Report for Current versus Last Year?

Trended, current-versus-last-year financial statements are considered comparative reports and are used by CFOs and financial managers to discover significant trends and anomalies. Some functionality in this type of report will dynamically display all periods up to the current month for this year, as well as, for last year. It also provides year-over-year variances for each month. Additionally, each year can be expanded and collapsed for easier readability of the report. You will find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Comparative Multi-Year Profit & Loss Reports

Companies and organizations use Comparative Multi-Year Profit & Loss Reports to make it easy to find trends and anomalies. When used as part of good business practices in a Finance and Accounting Department, a company can improve its ability to detect financial issues or opportunities, as well as, mitigate the risk that managers limit their analysis to monthly, year-to-date and budget variances.

Comparative Multi-Year Profit & Loss Report Example

Here is an example of a trended Profit & Loss Report that displays individual months for current and last year with variances.

Trended Profit & Loss Report Example for Current versus Last Year

Trended Profit & Loss Report Example for Current versus Last Year

You can find hundreds of additional examples here.

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Executives and Financial Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Comparative Multi-Year Profit & Loss Reports

Progressive Finance and Accounting Departments sometimes use several different Comparative Multi-Year Profit & Loss Reports, along with trended balance sheets, cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples