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Departmental Allocation Report Example

What is a Departmental Allocation Report?

Allocation reports are considered financial tools and are often used by accountants to estimate profitability for revenue-generating departments after distribution of overhead expenses to their financials. Some of the key functionality in this type of allocation tool is that it automatically calculates overhead amounts to be allocated from administrative- to revenue generating departments. Any number of allocation methods can be used. In the example below, the allocations were performed based on headcount and square feet. You find an example of this type of allocation tool below.

Purpose of Departmental Allocation Reports

Companies and organizations use Departmental Allocation Reports to get full visibility into the true profitability of their revenue-generating departments. When used as part of good business practices in a Finance and Accounting department, a company can improve its profit center analysis as well as reduce the chances that managers overstate profitability of departments that consume a lot of overhead services from other business units.

Departmental Allocation Report Example

Here is an example of a fully automated Allocation Report that calculates and stores allocated expenses by department.

Departmental Allocation Report Example

Departmental Allocation Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Allocation tool?

The typical users of this type of allocation tool are: CFOs and Department Managers.

Other Allocation tools Often Used in Conjunction with Departmental Allocation Reports

Progressive Finance and Accounting Departments sometimes use several different Departmental Allocation Reports, along with profit & loss reports, dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Trended Profit & Loss Report for Current versus Last Year Example

What is a Trended Profit & Loss Report for Current versus Last Year?

Trended, current versus last year financial statements are considered comparative reports and are used by CFOs and financial managers to discover signficant trends and anomalies. Some of the functionality in this type of report is that it dynamically displays all periods up to the current month for this year as well as for last year. It also provides year-over-year variances for each month. Also, each year can be expanded and collapsed for easier readability of the report. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Comparative Multi-Year Profit & Loss Reports

Companies and organizations use Comparative Multi-Year Profit & Loss Reports to make it easy to find trends and anomalizes. When used as part of good business practices in a Finance and Accounting Department, a company can improve its ability to detect financial issues or opportunities as well as reduce the chances that managers limit their analysis to monthly, year-to-date and budget variances.

Comparative Multi-Year Profit & Loss Report Example

Here is an example of a trended Profit & Loss Report that displays individual months for current and last year with variances.

Trended Profit & Loss Report Example for Current versus Last Year

Trended Profit & Loss Report Example for Current versus Last Year

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Executives and Financial Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Comparative Multi-Year Profit & Loss Reports

Progressive Finance and Accounting Departments sometimes use several different Comparative Multi-Year Profit & Loss Reports, along with trended balance sheets, cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Profit & Loss Report with Department Comparisons Example

What is a Profit & Loss Report with Department Comparisons?

Financial statements with organizational units in the columns are considered comparative reports and are often used by accountants and department managers to get a side-by-side view of how one department is doing versus another. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it automatically lists selected departments across the columns with a consolidated total. The rows in the report has a normal P&L layout. The charts on the right side help with the analysis. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Comparative Profit & Loss Reports

Companies and organizations use Comparative Profit & Loss Reports to easily compare how each department are doing versus the others, both for revenues and expenses. When used as part of good business practices in a Finance and Accounting Department, a company can improve its account-level analysis as well as reduce the chances that one department becomes an outlier without anyone taking notice, for example when it comes to certain expenses.

Comparative Profit & Loss Report Example

Here is an example of a Profit & Loss Report with departments listed across the columns.

Profit & Loss Report with Department Comparisons Example

Profit & Loss Report with Department Comparisons Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: CFOs, Controllers and Accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Comparative Profit & Loss Reports

Progressive Finance and Accounting Departments sometimes use several different Comparative Profit & Loss Reports, along with regular financial statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Profit & Loss Report with Monthly Trend Example

What is a Profit & Loss Report with Monthly Trend?

Trend-based Profit & Loss reports are considered important for analysis and are often used by CFOs and financial managers to look for upward or downward swings in the business. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it dynamically displays historical data for each month of the fiscal year up to the current period the user is running the report for. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Trended Profit & Loss Reports

Companies and organizations use Trended Profit & Loss Reports to get a side-by-side comparison of monthly results for the current year without having to run a single period report multiple times. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Department, a company can improve its ability to quickly detect trends in revenues, expenses and profitability as well as reduce the chances that important exceptions or shifts in the business goes undetected.

Trended Profit & Loss Report Example

Here is an example of a trend-based Profit & Loss Report with months displayed across the columns.

Profit & Loss Report with Monthly Trend Example

Profit & Loss Report with Monthly Trend Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Executives and Financial Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Trended Profit & Loss Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Trended Profit & Loss Reports, along with trended balance sheets, cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Profit & Loss Report with Estimate versus Budget Example

What is a Profit & Loss Report with Estimate versus Budget?

Profit & Loss estimate reports are considered variance analysis reports and are often used by CFOs and Executives to compare the most likely annual results with the original plan. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it automatically calculates the year end estimate based on actual figures year-to-date plus forecast for the remainder of the year. For each new month the user runs the report for, the current month’s actual data will replace the forecast for that month. The report also shows the original annual budget and the variance. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Profit & Loss Estimate Reports

Companies and organizations use Profit & Loss Estimate Reports to easily compare current likely (actual plus forecast) outcome versus the original budget. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Department, a company can improve its business decisions that are tied to year end results as well as reduce the chances that managers put too much weight on a budget that by now may be far off the actual results.

Profit & Loss Estimate Report Example

Here is an example of a Profit & Loss Report with estimate (actual YTD plus forecast), budget and variance columns.

Profit & Loss Report with Estimate versus Budget Example

Profit & Loss Report with Estimate versus Budget Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: CFOs and Executives.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Profit & Loss Estimate Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Profit & Loss Estimate Reports, along with balance sheets, cash flow reports, dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Profit & Loss Report with Links to Supporting Sub-ledger Reports Example

What is a Profit & Loss Report with Links to Supporting Sub-ledger Reports?

Financial statements with links to sub-ledger reports are considered self-service analysis reports and are often used by managers and accountants to provide users with easy answers to their questions. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it allows the user to click on the hyperlinked account numbers seen in the first column. These links will open a different report that provides granular details about the figure seen in the financial statement. Examples of such reports can be a sales report explaining a revenue figure or an accounts payable report explaining the details behind an expense figure. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Profit & Loss Reports with Links to Supporting Sub-ledger Reports

Companies and organizations use Profit & Loss Reports with Links to Supporting Sub-ledger Reports to give their users direct drill-down to detailed sub-ledger transactions to answer their questions. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Department, a company can improve its speed of decision-making as well as reduce the chances that managers have to contantly ask accountants to go back to the ERP system to explain figures in financial statements.

Profit & Loss Reports with Links to Supporting Sub-ledger Report Example

Here is an example of a Profit & Loss Report with hyperlinks to underlying sub-ledger transaction reports.

Profit & Loss Report with Links to Supporting Sub-ledger Reports Example

Profit & Loss Report with Links to Supporting Sub-ledger Reports Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Executives, Department Heads and Financial Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Profit & Loss Reports with Links to Supporting Sub-ledger Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Profit & Loss Reports with Links to Supporting Sub-ledger Reports, along with balance sheets, cash flow reports, transaction analysis reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Profit & Loss Report with Charts and Modern Layout Example

What is a Profit & Loss Report with Charts and Modern Layout?

Modern Profit & Loss Reports with KPIs are considered a new trend in user-friendly reports and are often used by executives and financial managers to analyze profitability, revenues and expenses. A key functionality in this type of report shows actual, budget and last year figures with variances. Some of the most important information in the report is displayed as charts and KPIs on the top. You will find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Modern Profit & Loss Reports with KPIs

Companies and organizations use Modern Profit & Loss Reports with KPIs to present financial information to managers in an attractive and intuitive way. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Department, a company can improve its analytical capabilities, as well as, mitigate risks that reporting users miss the most important information as they study financials.

Modern Profit & Loss Reports with KPI Example

Here is an example of a modern Profit & Loss Variance Report with KPIs displayed as charts.

Profit & Loss Report with Charts and Modern Layout Example

Profit & Loss Report with Charts and Modern Layout Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here.

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Executives and Financial Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Modern Profit & Loss Reports with KPIs

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Modern Profit & Loss Reports with KPIs, along with balance sheets, cash flow reports, dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Profit & Loss Report with Text Comment Column Example

What is a Profit & Loss Report with a Text Comment Column?

Profit & Loss reports with comment sections are considered interactive financial statements and are often used by finance teams to enter comments that explain financial figures. Key functionality in this type of report includes a data entry column in the middle of the report for comments. These comments can be saved to the database as a benefit for any user looking at the report on their own or in the future. You will find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Financial Statements with Comment Sections

Companies and organizations use Financial Statements with Comment Sections to capture explanations at the line item level in a report. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Department, a company can improve its ability to share important analytical commentary, while reducing the chance that managers repeatedly ask the same questions about figures and variances, or lose out on the benefits in general of such commentary.

Financial Statements with Comment Section Example

Here is an example of a Profit & Loss Report with a comment section in the middle.

Profit & Loss Report with Text Comment Column Example

Profit & Loss Report with Text Comment Column Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here.

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Executives and Financial Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Financial Statements with Comment Sections

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Financial Statements with Comment Sections, along with balance sheets, cash flow reports, dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Monthly Profit & Loss Report with Budget and Forecast Variances Example

What is a Monthly Profit & Loss Report with Budget and Forecast Variances?

Monthly Profit & Loss Variance Reports are considered core financial statements and are often used by executives and financial managers to review month-end results. Key functionality in this type of report provides actual to budget and forecast comparisons for the current period. It also shows the full year budget versus the revised forecast. Rows are grouped by department and can be expanded to view the individual accounts. You will find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Profit & Loss Reports with Budget and Forecast Variances

Companies and organizations use Profit & Loss Reports with Budget and Forecast Variances to easily view actual revenue, expense and profit performance compared to both the annual budget and the forecast. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Department, a company can improve its monthly and year-end tracking against plan, as well as, reduce the chance that managers lose sight of gaps between current performance versus current and year-end budgets and forecasts.

Profit & Loss Reports with Budget and Forecast Variance Example

Here is an example of a Profit & Loss Report with variances against budget and forecast.

Monthly Profit & Loss Report with Budget and Forecast Variances Example

Monthly Profit & Loss Report with Budget and Forecast Variances Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here.

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Executives and Department Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Profit & Loss Reports with Budget and Forecast Variances

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Profit & Loss Reports with Budget and Forecast Variances, along with balance sheets, cash flow reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Profit & Loss Variance Report with Expandable YTD Columns Example

What is a Profit & Loss Variance Report with Expandable YTD columns?

Profit & Loss Variance Reports are considered essential month-end reports and are often used by executives and the finance team to analyze the components that drive profitability. Key functionality in this type of report automatically provides a presentation-quality layout with account-level detail and traffic lights that highlight important variances. Each of the year-to-date columns can be expanded to see each individual month from the beginning of the year until the current period. You will find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Profit & Loss Variance Reports

Companies and organizations use Profit & Loss Variance Reports to analyze revenues, expenses and profitability, and to easily detect variances versus the same period last year and when compared to the budget. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Department, a company can improve its ability to interpret monthly financial results, as well as, reduce the chance that significant revenue or expense-related performance issues goes undetected.

Profit & Loss Variance Report Example

Here is an example of modern Profit & Loss Variance Report with expandable YTD columns and traffic lights to highlight important variances.

Profit & Loss Variance Report with Expandable YTD Columns Example

Profit & Loss Variance Report with Expandable YTD Columns Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here.

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Board Members, Executives and Department Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Profit & Loss Variance Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) Departments sometimes use several different Profit & Loss Variance Reports, along with balance sheets, cash flow reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples