Posts

Example of a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks

What is a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks?

Reconciliation Reports are considered data control tools and are used by accountants to help ensure that loan-related transactions tie to the General Ledger. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it for any given GL account chosen by the user will list and match with the related deposit transactions. In the columns display months up to the current period to make it easy to track historical balances. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Deposit and GL Reconciliation Reports

Banks use Deposit and GL Reconciliation Reports to automate and speed up the monthly close process and to ensure that data from deposit transactions match with the related GL postings. When used as part of good business practices in Accounting departments, a bank can improve its accounting staff efficiency, and it can reduce the chances that mistakes carry through to financial reports.

Example of a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report

Here is an example of a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report with user-defined parameters for Entity and Account.

Example of a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks

Example of a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Controllers and Accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Deposit and GL Reconciliation Reports

Progressive Accounting departments sometimes use several different Deposit and GL Reconciliation Reports, along with detailed deposit reports, profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from deposit management systems for retail banks and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks

What is a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks?

Reconciliation Reports are considered data control tools and are used by accountants to help ensure that loan-related transactions tie to the General Ledger. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it for any given GL account chosen by the user will list and match with the related loan transactions. The columns list months up to the current period to make it easy to track historical balances. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Loan and GL Reconciliation Reports

Banks use Loan and GL Reconciliation Reports to automate and speed up the monthly close process and to ensure that data from loan transactions match with the related GL postings. When used as part of good business practices in Accounting departments, a bank can improve its accounting staff efficiency, and it can reduce the chances that mistakes carry through to financial reports.

Example of a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report

Here is an example of a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report with user-defined parameters for Entity and Account.

Example of a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks

Example of a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Controllers and Accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Loan and GL Reconciliation Reports

Progressive Accounting departments sometimes use several different Loan and GL Reconciliation Reports, along with Detailed loan reports, profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from loan management systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks

What is a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks?

Reconciliation Reports are considered monthly data control tools and are used by accountants to help ensure that securities-related transactions tie to the General Ledger. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it for any given GL account chosen by the user will list and match with the related securities transactions. Months up to the current period are listed across the columns to track historical balances. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Securities and GL Reconciliation Reports

Banks use Securities and GL Reconciliation Reports to automate and speed up the monthly close process and to ensure that data from sub-ledgers match with the related GL postings. When used as part of good business practices in Accounting departments, a bank can improve its accounting staff efficiency, and it can reduce the chances that mistakes carry through to financial reports.

Example of a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report

Here is an example of a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report with user-defined parameters for Entity and Account.

Example of a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks

Example of a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Controllers and Accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Securities and GL Reconciliation Reports

Progressive Accounting departments sometimes use several different Securities and GL Reconciliation Reports, along with profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements, KPI reports, budget models, forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report for Credit Unions

What is a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report for Credit Unions?

Reconciliation Reports are considered data control tools and are used by accountants to help ensure that loan-related transactions tie to the General Ledger. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that for any given GL account chosen by the user it will list and match with the related deposit transactions. In the columns you find months up to the current period to make it easy to track historical balances. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Deposit and GL Reconciliation Reports

Credit Unions use Deposit and GL Reconciliation Reports to automate and speed up the monthly close process and to ensure that data from deposit transactions match with the related GL postings. When used as part of good business practices in Accounting departments, a company can improve its accounting staff efficiency, and it can reduce the chances that mistakes carry through to financial reports.

Example of a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report

Here is an example of a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report with user-defined parameters for Entity and Account.

Example of a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report for Credit Unions

Example of a Deposit and GL Reconciliation Report for Credit Unions

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Controllers and Accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Deposit and GL Reconciliation Reports

Progressive Accounting departments sometimes use several different Deposit and GL Reconciliation Reports, along with detailed deposit reports, trial balances, profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from loan management systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report for Credit Unions

What is a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report?

Reconciliation Reports are considered data control tools and are used by accountants to help ensure that loan-related transactions tie to the General Ledger. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it for any given GL account chosen by the user will list and match with the related loan transactions. In the columns you find months up to the current period in order to make it easy to track historical balances. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Loan and GL Reconciliation Reports

Credit Unions use Loan and GL Reconciliation Reports to automate and speed up the monthly close process and to ensure that data from loan transactions match with the related GL postings. When used as part of good business practices in Accounting departments, a company can improve its accounting staff efficiency, and it can reduce the chances that mistakes carry through to financial reports.

Example of a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report

Here is an example of a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report with user-defined parameters for Entity and Account.

Example of a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report for Credit Unions

Example of a Loan and GL Reconciliation Report for Credit Unions

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Controllers and Accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Loan and GL Reconciliation Reports

Progressive Accounting departments sometimes use several different Loan and GL Reconciliation Reports, along with Detailed loan reports, trial balances, profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from loan management systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report for Credit Unions

What is a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report?

Reconciliation Reports are considered monthly data control tools and are used by accountants to help ensure that securities-related transactions tie to the General Ledger. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it for any given GL account chosen by the user will list and match with the related securities transactions. Months up to the current period are listed across the column to track historical balances. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Securities and GL Reconciliation Reports

Credit Unions use Securities and GL Reconciliation Reports to automate and speed up the monthly close process and to ensure that data from sub-ledgers match with the related GL postings. When used as part of good business practices in Accounting departments, a company can improve its accounting staff efficiency, and it can reduce the chances that mistakes carry through to financial reports.

Example of a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report

Here is an example of a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report with user-defined parameters for Entity and Account as well as actual to budget comparisons.

Example of a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report for Credit Unions

Example of a Securities and GL Reconciliation Report for Credit Unions

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Controllers and Accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Securities and GL Reconciliation Reports

Progressive Accounting departments sometimes use several different Securities and GL Reconciliation Reports, along with profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements, KPI reports, budget models, forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Department Revenue and Expense Forecast Form

What is a Department Revenue and Expense Forecast Form?

Financial forecasts by department are considered important corporate planning tools and are used by budget managers and department heads to manage revenues and expenses and to replace annual budget figures. One key functionality in this type of forecast form allows users to view actual historical amounts through the current month and input forecast amounts for the rest of the year. You will find an example of this type of forecast form below.

Purpose of Departmental Forecast Forms

Companies and organizations use Departmental Forecast Forms to replace annual budgets for the current year and have a fresh outlook for the remaining periods. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Accounting Department, a company can improve its planning accuracy and its use of resources, as well as reduce the risk that the company completely misses its financial targets.

Departmental Forecast Form Example

Here is an example of a parameter-driven forecast input template by GL account and department.

Department Revenue and Expense Forecast Form

Department Revenue and Expense Forecast Form

You can find 100’s of additional examples here.

Who Uses This Type of Forecast Form?

The typical users of this type of forecast form are: CFOs, controllers, budget managers and department heads.

Other Forecast Forms Often Used in Conjunction with Departmental Forecast Forms

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Accounting Departments sometimes use several different Departmental Forecast Forms, along with sales forecasts, cash flow plans and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Technology Solutions and More Examples

bi360

This article will discuss today’s best budgeting and forecasting tools for not-for-profit organizations, specifically regarding their built-in features and functionalities to expand your Microsoft Dynamics GP experience.

Budgeting is such a crucial task, no matter if you’re budgeting for yourself or on the organizational level.  Regarding not-for-profit (NFP) organizations, budgeting might be the particular reason you are still afloat, living within your means to deliver for the community.  Recently, I had the opportunity to speak with NFP budget contributors, and the common theme was that technology has historically been restrictive when trying to meet modern planning goals.  Excel might suffice for your household budget, but is challenging for any healthy organization.  If you’re reading this blog post, you’re likely shopping around for independent software vendor (ISV) budgeting software that can read your historical Microsoft Dynamics GP figures and/or perhaps data from additional sources, like payroll from ADP or Ceridian, to streamline and improve your planning process.  Today’s planning solutions deliver secure collaboration functionality for planning tasks, which makes the inherent teamwork easier, so that your organization can be successful in living within their means.
Read more

This article discusses modern budgeting and forecasting solutions for non-profit organizations, zooming in on premier feature and functionality offerings to expand your Intacct experience.

Budgeting is such an important process, regardless of whether you’re doing financial planning in your personal life or full-scale organizational budgets and forecasts.  For non-profit organizations, budgeting can be the exact reason you are able to live within your means, surviving to continue providing what the community needs.  When recently speaking to non-profit budgeting contributors, I discovered that one of the biggest hurdles is the technology they are using to respond to today’s complex planning demands.  Excel might be perfect for a household budget, but performs subpar for any organization of a healthy size.  If you’re reading this article, you’re probably looking at independent software vendor (ISV) budgeting tools that can bring together your historical Intacct actuals and/or maybe information from another system, like payroll from ADP, to simplify and upgrade your planning processes.  Modern planning software delivers secure collaboration for your budgeting and forecasting tasks, which streamlines the requisite teamwork, so that you can successfully live within your organization’s means.
Read more

In this article, we’ll explore today’s budgeting and forecasting tool options, focusing on the best features and functions to improve your Intacct planning experience.

Yesterday, I went to a financial advising meeting, and I didn’t cringe or feel sick when they asked me for a personal monthly budget, so while I celebrated my own progress, I still cannot say that budgeting has ever been an exciting responsibility for me.  And in discussing organizational budgeting with finance professionals, it’s not much different in the business world, particularly with software that is limited in handling the modern complexities of planning.  Excel serves me adequately with my household budget, but is not sufficient for any healthy-sized company.  If you clicked on this article, you’re likely interested in finding third party budgeting software that brings your historical Intacct information and/or perhaps data from a payroll program like ADP to streamline and expedite your planning tasks.  Today’s planning tools offer secure paths to collaborating on budgeting and forecasting, which simplifies the teamwork required to live within our organizational means.
Read more