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Example of a Subscriber Dashboard for Media Companies

What is a Subscriber Dashboard?

Subscriber Dashboards are considered operational analysis tools and are used by executives, media and marketing managers to get important insights into subscriber KPIs, content preferences and trends. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides analysis of user KPIs from four different perspectives, including: 1) Monthly trend in total number of users, 2) Number of added users and churn per day, 3) Subscriber reach by country (region/geography), and 4) Number of subscribers per genre. The filters on top of the dashboard enables slicing by year and station/business unit. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Subscriber Analysis Dashboard

Media companies use Subscriber Analysis Dashboard to get a clear picture of the key user (subscriber) trends that drives the success of the company. When used as part of good business practices in Product and Marketing departments, a company can grow revenues by improving offerings and Go-To-Market tactics, and it can reduce the chances that managers are lacking visibility to subscriber churn and content preferences.

Example of a Subscriber Dashboard

Here is an example of a Subscriber Dashboard with trends in user KPIs as well as genre metrics.

Example of a Subscriber Dashboard for Media Companies

Example of a Subscriber Dashboard for Media Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, category managers, media managers, sales managers, marketing managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Subscriber Analysis Dashboard

Progressive Product and Marketing departments sometimes use several different Subscriber Analysis Dashboard, along with detailed subscriber reports, churn reports, financial statements, financial dashboards, sales forecasts, annual budgets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from media traffic systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Revenue Dashboard for Media Companies

What is a Revenue Dashboard for Media Companies?

Revenue Dashboards are considered financial analysis tools and are used by executives and sales managers to monitor revenues across business units, products and customers. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it enables analysis across five different perspectives, including: 1) Total revenue, 2) Actual and budgeted revenue by business unit, 3) Revenue contribution (%) by division, 4) Top ten customers, and 5) Revenue by product (or service). You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Revenue Dashboards

Media companies use Revenue Dashboards to enable leaders with a self-service interface to easily see the main contributors to the company’s top line. When used as part of good business practices in Executive, Sales and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, a company can improve its growth strategies and increase revenues, and it can reduce the chances that lack of good performance insight leads to delayed decisions.

Example of a Revenue Dashboard

Here is an example of a Revenue Dashboard with actual and budget analysis as well as comparisons of top contributors across customers, products and business locations.

Example of a Revenue Dashboard for Media Companies

Example of a Revenue Dashboard for Media Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Sales managers, executives, analysts, CFOs.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Revenue Dashboards

Progressive Executive, Sales and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Revenue Dashboards, along with detailed sales reports, profit & loss reports, financial dashboards, sales forecasts, annual budgets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Securities Dashboard for Banks

What is a Securities Dashboard for Banks?

Securities Dashboards are considered financial instrument analysis tools and are used by executives and financial managers to analyze key metrics for the bank’s financial instruments. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it track performance metrics from three different perspectives, including: 1) Tree map showing market value for the banks securities, 2) Ranked comparisons of book value and yield per financial instrument, and 3) Ranked comparisons of book value and yield per instrument. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Securities Dashboards

Banks use Securities Dashboards to give leaders and analysts a single screen to quickly see values and yields related to their financial instruments. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, a company can improve its decision-making and increase profitability, and it can reduce the chances that leaders miss important trends and KPI statuses.

Example of a Securities Dashboard

Here is an example of a Securities Dashboard with KPIs for market values, book values and yields.

Example of a Securities Dashboard for Banks

Example of a Securities Dashboard for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, CFOs, analysts, securities managers, investment managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Securities Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Securities Dashboards, along with detailed securities dashboards, securities reports, investment reports, financial statements, forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from financial investment systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Customer Acquisition Dashboard for Banks

What is a Customer Acquisition Dashboard?

Customer Acquisition Dashboards are considered customer analysis tools and are used by executives, marketing and product managers to analyze metrics and trends related to new customers. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides easy insight into customer behavior from four different perspectives, including: 1) Top loan balances by category, 2) Total loan balance by bank branch, 3) Table with customer metrics as well as totals: Loan balance, interest rate, transfer rate, net interest margin, interest amount, and 4) Monthly trend with loan balance and margin. The dashboard is interactive so, as an example, if the user clicks on a specific customer the entire dashboard filters down to only show data for that selection. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Customer Acquisition Dashboards

Banks use Customer Acquisition Dashboards to enable managers to quickly get a picture of customer product preferences and related financial impact. When used as part of good business practices in Sales/Customer Acquisition and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, a company can improve its customer- and marketing strategies and increase related revenues, and it can reduce the chances that sales and product managers sub-optimize their offerings and marketing decisions.

Example of a Customer Acquisition Dashboard

Here is an example of a Customer Acquisition Dashboard with loan balances and margin trends.

Example of a Customer Acquisition Dashboard for Banks

Example of a Customer Acquisition Dashboard for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, marketing managers, product managers, sales managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Customer Acquisition Dashboards

Progressive Sales/customer Acquisition and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Customer Acquisition Dashboards, along with financial statements, product dashboards, loan dashboards, KPI reports, call reports, detailed customer reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Loan Dashboard for Banks

What is a Loan Dashboard for Banks?

Loan Dashboards are considered operational monitoring tools and are used by executives and loan managers to analyze key trends and metrics for their loan portfolios. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboards is that it provides performance analysis across six different perspectives: 1) Declined and approved loans by product, 2) Approved loan value by bank branch, 3) Approved loan value by product, 4) Default amount by branch, 5) Monthly trend in default quantities and values, and 6) KPIs for total approved and default loan values, and percent approval/default value. You find an example of this type of dashboards below.

Purpose of Loan Dashboards

Banks use Loan Dashboards to quickly detect anomalies or trends in their loan business. When used as part of good business practices in Loan- and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, a company can improve its loan strategies and related revenues, and it can reduce the chances that managers miss trends or correlations related to approvals and defaults.

Example of a Loan Dashboard

Here is an example of a Loan Dashboard with analysis of approved and declined loans as well as trends in defaults.

Example of a Loan Dashboard for Banks

Example of a Loan Dashboard for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboards?

The typical users of this type of dashboards are: Executives, CFOs, loan managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Loan Dashboards

Progressive Loan- and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Loan Dashboards, along with detailed loan approval reports, loans declined reports, loan defaults reports, loan revenue reports, corporate dashboards, consolidated and branch-level profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements, detailed operational dashboards, and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from loan management software and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a CFO Dashboards for Banks

What is a CFO Dashboard for Banks?

CFO Dashboards are considered financial analysis tools and are used by CFOs and analysts to track trends and key performance metrics. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides financial analysis from nine different perspectives: 1) Actual and budget revenue by product, 2) Monthly actual and budget revenue trend, 3) Revenue by comparison by product, 4) Actual and budget revenue by department, 5) Monthly actual and budget expense trend, 6) Revenue comparison by department, 7) Actual and budgeted revenue by branch, 8) Actual and budget monthly profit trend, and 9) Revenue comparison by branch. You find an example of this type of dashboards below.

Purpose of CFO Dashboards

Banks use CFO Dashboards to give financial executives a clear picture of KPIs that drives the health of the business. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, a company can improve its financial performance and speed up related operational decisions, and it can reduce the chances that top level metrics are missed during financial analysis.

Example of a CFO Dashboard

Here is an example of a CFO Dashboard with revenue, expense and profit trends and budget comparisons.

Example of a CFO Dashboards for Banks

Example of a CFO Dashboards for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboards?

The typical users of this type of dashboards are: Executives, board members, CFOs, analysts, branch managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with CFO Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different CFO Dashboards, along with consolidated and branch-level profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements, detailed operating dashboards, and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from loan management software and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of an Executive Dashboard for Banks

What is an Executive Dashboard for Banks?

Executive Dashboards are considered interactive decision-making tools and are used by senior leaders to monitor trends and benchmark financial KPIs across bank branches. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides financial analysis from nine different perspectives: 1) Actual and budget revenue by branch, 2) Monthly actual and budget revenue trend, 3) Top five branches by revenue, 4) Actual and budget expenses by branch, 5) Monthly actual and budget expense trend, 6) Top five branches by expenses, 7) Actual and budgeted profit by branch, 8) Actual and budget monthly profit trend, and 9) Top five branches by profit. You find an example of this type of dashboards below.

Purpose of Executive Financial Dashboards

Banks use Executive Financial Dashboards to give their leaders an easy way to monitor top level financial KPIs and to do comparisons across their business units. When used as part of good business practices in Executive and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, a company can improve its strategies and resulting financial results, and it can reduce the chances that senior leaders have to delay decision-processes due to lack of clear, real time metrics.

Example of a Executive Financial Dashboard

Here is an example of an Executive Dashboard with bank branch comparisons as well as consolidated actual and budget trends.

Example of an Executive Dashboard for Banks

Example of an Executive Dashboard for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboards?

The typical users of this type of dashboards are: Executives, board members, CFOs.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Executive Financial Dashboards

Progressive Executive and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Executive Dashboards, along with consolidated and branch-level profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements, detailed operating dashboards, and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from loan management software and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Product Dashboard for Banks

What is a Product Dashboard for Banks?

Product Dashboards are considered operational analysis tools and are used by executives and product managers to monitor KPIs across regions and revenue categories. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it enables monitoring of metrics across five different areas, including: 1) Geographic map with revenue by branch, 2) Revenue distribution by product, such as: capex loans, home loans, debt restructuring, commercial property loan, credit cards, vehicle financing, 3) Declined versus approved loans by branch, 4) Default amount by branch, and 5) Default amount by product. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Financial Product Dashboards

Banks use Financial Product Dashboards to give leaders a real time snapshot of the health of the business across their product lines. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, a company can improve its product strategies, and it can reduce the chances that poor visibility to performance results in slower or sub-optimized decisions.

Example of a Financial Product Dashboard

Here is an example of a Product Dashboard with revenue analysis with defaults and approvals.

Bank – Product Dashboard

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboards?

The typical users of this type of dashboards are: Executives, CFOs, product managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Financial Product Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Financial Product Dashboards, along with detailed product revenue and loan default reports, corporate dashboards, consolidated and branch-level profit & loss reports, balance sheets, cash flow statements, detailed operational dashboards, and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from loan management software and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Claims Dashboard for Insurance Companies

What is a Claims Dashboard?

Claims Dashboards are considered operational analysis tools and are used by Claims Managers and Executives to KPIs and trends related to claims metrics. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides analysis from nine different perspectives: 1) Total claims and claims amount based on the selected time parameters, 2) Claims by product line, 3) Average days claims are open per policy, 4) Claims payout versus denied claims with monthly trends, 5) Average claim amount per policy type, 6) Claim status analysis, 7) Claim amount comparison with monthly trends, 8) Claims expense by product line, and 9) Assured amount by policy type. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Insurance Claims Dashboards

Insurance companies use Insurance Claims Dashboards to give their managers and executives an easy way to monitor the health of claims activities. When used as part of good business practices in Claims and Finance departments, an organization can improve its claims strategies and related bottom line, and it can reduce the chances that leaders don’t have a clear picture of claims trends and results.

Example of a Insurance Claims Dashboard

Here is an example of a Claims Dashboard with key trends and KPIs.

Example of a Claims Dashboard for Insurance Companies

Example of a Claims Dashboard for Insurance Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Claims Managers, Executives, Analysts.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Insurance Claims Dashboards

Progressive Claims and Finance departments sometimes use several different Insurance Claims Dashboards, along with claims reports, financial dashboards, financial statements, budget models, forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples