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Example of a Top Ten Customers by Profitability Report for banks

What is a Top Ten Customers by Profitability Report for Banks?

Top Customer by Profitability Reports are considered customer ranking reports and are used by managers and account executives to get a snapshot of the top most profitable customer by branch. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it groups and ranks the top 10 customers by branch location. The columns include: Average account balance, Total revenue, Total expense, and Net profit. The color indicators help the user quickly see important metrics. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Top Customers by Profitability Reports

Banks use Top Customers by Profitability Reports to at any time be able to identify their most important customers at the branch level and overall. When used as part of good business practices in Executive- and Account Management departments, a bank can improve its customer retention strategies, and it can reduce the chances that top customers are not getting the optimal nurturing.

Example of a Top Customers by Profitability Report

Here is an example of a Top Ten Customer Report that ranks each customer based on profitability and groups them by branch.

Example of a Top Ten Customers by Profitability Report for banks

Example of a Top Ten Customers by Profitability Report for banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Account executives, production managers, branch managers, analysts.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Top Customers by Profitability Reports

Progressive Executive- and Account Management departments sometimes use several different Top Customers Reports, along with detailed customer transaction reports, financial statements, annual budgets, KPI dashboards, customer dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from bank systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a New Customer Acquisition Report for Banks

What is a New Customer Acquisition Report for Banks?

New Customer Acquisition Reports are considered growth and profitability analysis tools and are used by sales managers and leaders to monitor new customer growth and profitability metrics. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it shows new customer KPIs for any given month and branch. The rows list new customers and key columns include detail and totals for: Average product balance, Net interest amount, Monthly cost, SFAS cost and Net profit. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of New Customer Acquisition Reports

Banks use New Customer Acquisition Reports to easily analyze the quantity of new customers a branch has acquired and the level of profitability associated with each customer and in total. When used as part of good business practices in Production- and Account Management departments, a bank can improve its revenue growth strategies, and it can reduce the chances that unprofitable tactics are not quickly addressed.

Example of a New Customer Acquisition Report

Here is an example of a New Customer Acquisition Report with a detailed listing of new customers for any given month as well as related KPIs.

Example of a New Customer Acquisition Report for Banks

Example of a New Customer Acquisition Report for Banks

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Account executives, production managers, branch managers, analysts.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with New Customer Acquisition Reports

Progressive Production- and Account Management departments sometimes use several different New Customer Acquisition Reports, along with financial statements, annual budgets, sales forecasts, KPI dashboards, customer dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from bank systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Client Project Estimate Template for Professional Services Companies

What is  Client Project Estimate Template for Professional Services Companies?

Client Estimate Models are considered project and resource planning tools and are used by project leaders and consultants to enter all key metrics related to a client project. Some of the main functionality in this type of input form is that it gives project managers a online, database-driven template to enter data to estimate and quote metrics like: 1) Comments/line item descriptions, 2) Lower and upper hour and cost estimates, and 3) Start date and end date. All of these inputs can be done at any level of detail with automated sub-totals and totals. The screen shot example below shows a few of these and many more are below and to the right of what is visible in the screenshot.. You find an example of this type of input form below.

Purpose of Client Estimate Input Forms

Professional Services organizations use Client Estimate Input Forms to capture all important metrics that go into a project estimate. These can then be reused in actual vs estimate status reports and in higher level summary reports and dashboards that go across any number of consultants and projects. When used as part of good business practices in PMO and Consulting departments, a company can improve its internal forecasting and resource planning as well as provide detailed backup for statement of works (SOWs) and client communication, and it can reduce the chances of cost or time overruns or inaccurate forecasts.

Example of a Client Estimate Input Form

Here is an example of a Client Project Estimate Form with comments, high/low hours and cost estimates.  Note, many details are not visible in the screenshots.

Example of a Client Project Estimate Template for Professional Services Companies

Example of a Client Project Estimate Template for Professional Services Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Input form?

The typical users of this type of input form are: Service Leaders, Project Managers, Consultants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Client Estimate Input Forms

Progressive PMO and Consulting departments sometimes use several different Client Estimate Input Forms, along with KPI dashboards, consultant billing reports, project dashboards, project detailed and summary reports, project forecast models, annual budget models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Customer Billing Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

What is a Customer Billing Dashboard?

Customer Billing Dashboards are considered client analysis tools and are used by executives and project managers to review revenues and hours by client and location. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides analysis from these two major perspectives: 1) Customers ranked by billable amount and with billable hours and nonbillable hours, and 2) Customer locations (note that the size of the markers can be set to correspond to e.g. the billable amount for each customer). The user can choose year with the drop down filter on the top of the screen. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Customer Billing Dashboards

Professional service organizations use Customer Billing Dashboards to gives managers an easy way to see which customers are providing the most revenues , or reversely – nonbillable hours, and if there are any patterns related to geographical customer location. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Consulting departments, an organization can improve its customer strategies and increase revenues, and it can reduce the chances that important trends are missed with resulting impact on margins..

Example of a Customer Billing Dashboard

Here is an example of a Customer Billing Dashboard with billing and hourly metrics as well as geographic location displayed on a map.

Example of a Customer Billing Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, CFOs, consulting managers, analysts, sales managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Customer Billing Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Consulting departments sometimes use several different Customer Billing Dashboards, along with profit & loss reports, project dashboards, revenue dashboards, detailed billing and utilization reports, project budget models, billing forecast models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Customer and Product Revenue Dashboard for Distributors

What is a Customer and Product Revenue Dashboard?

Customer and Product Revenue Dashboards are considered sales and tactical analysis tools and are used by sales & marketing executives and product managers to explore key revenue drivers from multiple perspectives. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it offers interactive graphical KPI analysis, including views of: 1) New customer and product count, 2) Sales and margin ranked by customer, 3) Revenues ranked by top product performers, 4) Individual product sales as a % of total sales, 5) Revenue and customer rating, and 6) Revenue versus customer attitude. The filters on the top right of the screen enables drill-down to customer, business unit and period. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Customer and Product Dashboards

Distributors use Customer and Product Dashboards to enable managers to easily monitor key sales, margin and rating metrics with visibility to customers and products. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Sales department, an organization can improve and speed up its strategic product and go-to-market decisions, and it can reduce the chances that managers only pay attention to higher level revenue figures because they don’t have easy anywhere, anytime access to drill down to detailed data.

Customer and Product Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Customer and Product Dashboard with revenue, margin and rating analysis.

Distribution – Customer and Product Analysis

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Sales and marketing executives, product managers, analysts.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Customer and Product Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Sales departments sometimes use several different Customer and Product Dashboards, along with detailed sales reports, trend reports, financial dashboards, sales forecasts, financial statements and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Sales by Customer Report for a Distribution Company

What is a Sales by Customer Report for a Distribution Company?

Customer sales reports with breakout by product group are considered critical revenue analysis tools and are used by sales executives and analysts to get a detailed picture of who is buying what and where, and how this has changed over time. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it is parameter-driven and the user can run it for any time period. Customers are listed down the rows and they are grouped into domestic and international categories. Major product groups are listed across the columns with each one containing actual monthly sales, sales for the same month in the prior year, variance % and variance amount. The colored arrows act as easy to see indicators of positive and negative variances. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Sales by Customer Reports

Distribution businesses use Sales by Customer Reports to easily detect year over year variances in how much- and which product types customers are buying. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and sales department, a company can improve its go-to-market strategies, and it can reduce the chances that customer or product outliers are not quickly detected in order to make timely decisions.

Sales by Customer Report Example

Here is an example of a Customer Sales Report with product detail and variance analysis.

Example of a Sales by Customer Report for a Distribution Company

Example of a Sales by Customer Report for a Distribution Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Sales executives, account managers, territory managers, product managers and analysts.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Sales by Customer Reports

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and sales departments sometimes use several different Sales by Customer Reports, along with  sales transaction reports, sales dashboards, sales forecasts, sales budgets, profit & loss reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples