Posts

Example of a Weekly Consulting Billing and Utilization Report for Professional Services Companies

What is  Weekly Consulting Billing and Utilization Report?

Consulting Utilization and Billing Reports are considered performance analysis tools and are used by Consulting Managers and Executives to analyze weekly, monthly and year-to-date (YTD) billing and utilization by consultant. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it it can be run for any week and based on this it will show hours, billing amount and utilization per person for the selected week, month and YTD. It also shows prior year YTD figures and variances. In the lower portion of the report it also shows the top 20 Customers, Top 20 Partners and Top 20 Non-billable Customers based on YTD billing amount. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Weekly Consulting Billing and Utilization Reports

Professional Services organizations use Weekly Billing and Utilization Reports to give consulting leaders a great weekly snapshot of billing activities and workload at a consultant level. When used as part of good business practices in PMO and Consulting departments, a company can improve its tactics related to utilization and billing, and it can reduce the chances that managers don’t take quick action on too low or too high utilization because they don’t have clear weekly reports.

Example of a Weekly Billing and Utilization Report

Here is an example of a Weekly Billing and Utilization Report with metrics by consultant and with Top 20 rankings for customers and partners.

Example of a Weekly Consulting Billing and Utilization Report for Professional Services Companies

Example of a Weekly Consulting Billing and Utilization Report for Professional Services Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Service Leaders, Project Managers, Consultants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Weekly Billing and Utilization Reports

Progressive PMO and Consulting departments sometimes use several different Weekly Billing and Utilization Reports, along with billing and utilization dashboards, project dashboards, detailed project and summary reports, revenue forecast models, annual budget models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Watch demo videos of reporting, planning and dashboards

Example of a Monthly Billing Trends by Consultant Report for Professional Services Companies

What is  Monthly Billing Trends by Consultant Report?

Monthly Billing Trend Reports are considered revenue and performance analysis tools and are used by Consulting Managers and Executives to look at multi-year billing trends, seasonality and budget variances. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it it can be run for any period and will dynamically display monthly data for the past five years as well as current year budget. All consultants with billings in any of the months will display down the rows, with a Total, Total Last Year, Budget, as well as Variances. There is a chart on the right side (not visible in the screenshot below) that shows the total billings for each consultant, and the chart at the bottom shows the total billings per month. Notice the tabs at the bottom of the report where Weekly Utilization is another report produced in the same report pack to allow for drill down to the current week. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Monthly Billing Trend Reports

Professional Services organizations use Monthly Billing Trend Reports to give services leaders a clear picture of monthly and annual fluctuations in billings both in total and down to the individual consultant level. When used as part of good business practices in PMO and Consulting departments, a company can improve its tactics related to utilization and billing analysis, and it can reduce the chances that managers don’t, as early as possible, notice important trends.

Example of a Monthly Billing Trend Report

Here is an example of a Monthly Billing Trend Report with revenue by consultant as well as multiple years of historical data.

Example of a Monthly Billing Trends by Consultant Report for Professional Services Companies

Example of a Monthly Billing Trends by Consultant Report for Professional Services Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Service Leaders, Project Managers, Consultants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Monthly Billing Trend Reports

Progressive PMO and Consulting departments sometimes use several different Monthly Billing Trend Reports, along with consultant billing reports, billing revenue dashboards, project dashboards, detailed project and summary reports, revenue forecast models, annual budget models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Project Hours by Consultant Report for Professional Service Companies

What is a Project Hours by Consultant Report?

Project Hours Reports are considered operational analysis tools and are used by Consulting Managers to get a detailed picture of hours delivered by week by consultant and project. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it dynamically displays hours by week across the columns and consultants grouped by project down the rows. Filters on the report include: Starting week of the report, year, and project managers. The report can include thresholds and if the number of hours pass these then the applicable cells will switch to a red color. The far right of the report (not visible in the example below) shows Total Hours and the bottom of the report shows total hours across all projects per employee. If the report is run for multiple project managers (PMs) these will each have their projects on a separate tab (see bottom of the report). The first tab shows the summary across all PMs. On a separate tab, the report also shows all projects that are on hold. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Project Hours Reports by Consultant Reports

Professional Services organizations use Project Hours Reports by Consultant Reports to get an exact idea of all delivered project hours both per PM and in aggregate. When used as part of good business practices in PMO and Consulting departments, a company can improve its resource and planning decisions because it can track and analyze delivery hours on a week by week basis both at the most granular level as well as in aggregate, and it can reduce the chances that potential issues go undetected due to lack of visibility to delivered hours.

Example of a Project Hours Reports by Consultant Report

Here is an example of a Project Hours Report with separate tabs for summary, projects by PM and projects on hold.

Example of a Project Hours by Consultant Report for Professional Service Companies

Example of a Project Hours by Consultant Report for Professional Service Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Service Leaders, Project Managers, Budget Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Project Hours Reports by Consultant Reports

Progressive PMO and Consulting departments sometimes use several different Project Hours Reports by Consultant, along with KPI dashboards, consultant billing reports, client dashboards, project detailed and summary reports, project forecast models, annual budget models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Forecast by Client and Consultant for Professional Services Companies

What is a Forecast by Client and Consultant?

Consultant Forecasting and Budgeting Models are considered revenue estimate- and resource planning tools and are used by Budgeting Managers and project leaders to enter forecasted hours by client and consultant for the remainder of the year. Some of the main functionality in this type of input form is that it gives consulting managers a online, database-driven template to input hourly estimates. Information seen in the example below includes: Client, Project Manager (PM) and Employee (consultant), Actual data year-to-date figures (this is read only and comes from the ERP system), data entry cells for the remaining months of the year with a grant total on the far right. At the bottom of the form (not visible in the screenshot) hours are aggregated to totals by employee and then multiplied with average hourly rates to show the grant total estimated service revenues for the year. You find an example of this type of input form below.

Purpose of a Forecast by Client and Consultant Input Forms

Professional Services organizations use Forecast by Client and Consultant Input Forms to create detailed forecasts or annual budgets using bottom-up input of hour estimates. The captured estimates can of course also be reused in actual vs estimate status reports and in higher level summary reports and dashboards. When used as part of good business practices in PMO and Consulting departments, a company can improve its internal forecasting and can maximize revenues with improved resource planning. It will also reduce the chances that inaccurate- or lack of hourly estimates leads to under- or overstaffing with resulting negative impact on the bottom line.

Example of a Forecast by Client and Consultant Input Form

Here is an example of a Client Project Estimate Form with input of hourly forecasts by client, PM and consultant.

Example of a Forecast by Client and Consultant for Professional Services Companies

Example of a Forecast by Client and Consultant for Professional Services Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Input form?

The typical users of this type of input form are: Service Leaders, Project Managers, Budget Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Forecast by Client and Consultant Input Forms

Progressive PMO and Consulting departments sometimes use several different Forecast by Client and Consultant Input Forms, along with KPI dashboards, consultant billing reports, client dashboards, project detailed and summary reports, project forecast models, annual budget models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of an Executive Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

What is an Executive Dashboard for Professional Services Companies?

Executive Dashboards are considered monitoring tools and are used by senior leaders as a self-service, real-time solution to review revenue and expense trends as well as key project metrics. Some of the main functionality in this type of visual report is that it is parameter driven so the user can run it for any year and month to see the result graphically. The report shows eight perspectives of the business, including: 1) Actual versus budget revenue by category, 2) Actual and budget monthly revenue trend, 3) Top five expenses with actual to budget comparison, 4) Actual and budget expense trend, 5) Pipeline by project, with high and low estimates, 6) Monthly pipeline trend with high and low estimates, 7) Top ten clients by billing amount, and 8) Bottom ten clients by billing amount. Below the charts there is a table section showing the figures used in the visuals. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Executive Dashboards for Professional Services

Professional Services organizations use Executive Dashboards to give leaders an easy way to analyze the top performance drivers of the company. When used as part of good business practices in Executive departments, a company can improve its strategic decisions and financial performance, and it can reduce the chances that key profitability inhibitors are not addressed in a timely fashion due to lack of insight to the underlying metrics.

Example of a Executive Dashboards for Professional Service

Here is an example of an Executive Dashboard with revenue and expense trends and variances as well as client rankings.

Example of an Executive Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

Example of an Executive Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Visual report?

The typical users of this type of visual report are: CEOs, COOs, CFOs, CROs and other top leaders.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Executive Dashboards for Professional Services

Progressive Executive departments sometimes use several different Executive Dashboards, along with profit & loss reports, KPI dashboards, project dashboards and detailed project reports, project forecast models, annual budget models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Customer Billing Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

What is a Customer Billing Dashboard?

Customer Billing Dashboards are considered client analysis tools and are used by executives and project managers to review revenues and hours by client and location. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides analysis from these two major perspectives: 1) Customers ranked by billable amount and with billable hours and nonbillable hours, and 2) Customer locations (note that the size of the markers can be set to correspond to e.g. the billable amount for each customer). The user can choose year with the drop down filter on the top of the screen. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Customer Billing Dashboards

Professional service organizations use Customer Billing Dashboards to gives managers an easy way to see which customers are providing the most revenues , or reversely – nonbillable hours, and if there are any patterns related to geographical customer location. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Consulting departments, an organization can improve its customer strategies and increase revenues, and it can reduce the chances that important trends are missed with resulting impact on margins..

Example of a Customer Billing Dashboard

Here is an example of a Customer Billing Dashboard with billing and hourly metrics as well as geographic location displayed on a map.

Example of a Customer Billing Dashboard for Professional Services Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, CFOs, consulting managers, analysts, sales managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Customer Billing Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Consulting departments sometimes use several different Customer Billing Dashboards, along with profit & loss reports, project dashboards, revenue dashboards, detailed billing and utilization reports, project budget models, billing forecast models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Project Dashboard for a Professional Services Company

What is a Project Dashboard for a Professional Services Company?

Project Dashboards are considered operational monitoring tools and are used by executives and project managers to analyze consulting resources and project performance. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it enables analysis of KPIs and other metrics from six different perspectives: 1) Project manager ranked by billings and with billable amount, billable hours and nonbillable hours, 2) Consultants ranked by billable amount and with billable hours and nonbillable hours, 3) Number of projects by project manager (PM), 4) Percent of projects with green, yellow and red status, 5) Monthly trend in billable amounts, and 6) Monthly trend in billable hours. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Project Dashboards

Professional service organizations use Project Dashboards to gives consulting leaders an easy way to understand how project managers, consultants and projects are performing. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Consulting departments, an organization can improve its decision speed as it relates to projects and professional resources, and it can reduce the chances that poor performance goes undetected with likely resulting loss in revenues.

Example of a Project Dashboard

Here is an example of a Project Dashboard with metrics of PMs and their team members as well as project status.

Example of a Project Dashboard for a Professional Services Company

Example of a Project Dashboard for a Professional Services Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, CFOs, consulting managers, project managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Project Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Consulting departments sometimes use several different Project Dashboards, along with profit & loss reports, project dashboards, revenue dashboards, detailed billing and utilization reports, project budget models, billing forecast models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Billing KPI Dashboard for a Professional Services Company

What is a Billing KPI Dashboard?

KPI Dashboards with billing metrics are considered operational analysis tools and are used by executives and project managers to monitor billing revenue and utilization metrics. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides analysis of KPIs from 8 different perspectives: 1) Monthly service revenue trend, actual and budget, 2) Monthly billable hours trend, 3) Top ten customers with billable amount, hours and nonbillable hours, 4) Top ten consultants with billable amount, hours and nonbillable hours, 5) Total billable revenue, 6) Total billable hours, 7) Total nonbillable hours, and ) Current year pipeline projections. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Billing KPI Dashboards

Professional service organizations use Billing KPI Dashboards to gives leaders an overview of the aggregate and individual performance of their consulting team. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Consulting/Services departments, an organization can improve its tactical customer and project decisions and increase related revenues, and it can reduce the chances that executives lack insight to key services trends and variances.

Example of a KPI Dashboard

Here is an example of a KPI Dashboard with trends in services revenues and billing performance metrics.

Example of a Billing KPI Dashboard for a Professional Services Company

Example of a Billing KPI Dashboard for a Professional Services Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, CFOs, consulting managers, project managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with KPI Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Consulting/Services departments sometimes use several different KPI Dashboards, along with profit & loss reports, project dashboards, revenue dashboards, detailed billing and utilization reports, project budget models, billing forecast models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Revenue and Expense Dashboard for a Professional Services Company

What is a Revenue and Expense Dashboard?

Revenue and Expense Dashboards are considered financial analysis tools and are used by Executives and CFOs to analyze trends and budget variances. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides analysis of key corporate metrics from six different perspectives: 1) Actual and budgeted revenue ranked by category, 2) Top five actual and budgeted expenses, 3) Actual and budgeted monthly revenue trend, 4) Actual and budgeted monthly expense trend, 5) High and low estimate for current year projected hours, and 6) High and low estimate for current year projected billable amounts. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Revenue and Expense Analysis Dashboards

Professional services organizations use Revenue and Expense Analysis Dashboards to provide executives with a one page overview of key financial figures as well as a pipeline outlook for hours delivered. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, an organization can improve its strategic decisions and profitability, and it can reduce the chances that decision-makers are missing the big picture.

Example of a Revenue and Expense Analysis Dashboard

Here is an example of a Revenue and Expense Dashboard with actual and budget variances and trends.

Example of a Revenue and Expense Dashboard for a Professional Services Company

Example of a Revenue and Expense Dashboard for a Professional Services Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, CFOs, boards, analysts.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Revenue and Expense Analysis Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Revenue and Expense Analysis Dashboards, along with profit & loss reports, KPI dashboards, project dashboards, project reports, detailed billing reports, budget input models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

This article will focus on Cloud-based Call Report Automation for Banks.
 
incomestatementbi360Why does going to the dentist always seem stressful? I have been going to the same dentist for over twenty years.  He has seen my children grow up.  He has seen me change jobs a couple of times.  My wife has even joined his team in a fund raiser or two.  You would think that every time I see him, a warm fuzzy feeling would overcome my emotions.
Read more