Posts

Opportunity Analysis by Sales Person Report Example

What is a Opportunity Analysis by Sales Person Report?

Opportunity by Sales Person reports are considered pipeline analysis tools and are often used by sales managers to review prospect details and pipeline totals for each team member. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it pulls data from the company’s CRM system and organizes it with easy to read KPIs. The filters in the report shows Open opportunities for a given date range and based on more than e.g. 10% probability. In the rows each sales person is listed and below each person all the opportunities are listed. The columns display essential metrics such as Estimated Close Date, Probability, Estimated Revenue, Weighted Revenue, and Days in the pipeline. The Average Days in Pipeline KPI number is a very important metric on the total row for each sales person. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Opportunity Analysis by Sales Person Reports

Companies and organizations use Opportunity Analysis by Sales Person Reports to easily and quickly view pipeline metrics by sales person and in total. When used as part of good business practices in a Sales department, a company can improve its sales forecasting and sales person pipeline analysis as well as reduce the chances that managers miss sales funnel issues that could end up hurting revenues.

Opportunity Analysis by Sales Person Report Example

Here is an example of Sales Opportunity by Sales Person analysis report.

Opportunity Analysis by Sales Person Report Example

Opportunity Analysis by Sales Person Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Sales managers, sales team members.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Opportunity Analysis by Sales Person Reports

Progressive Sales Departments sometimes use several different Opportunity Analysis by Sales Person Reports, along with pipeline funnel reports, marketing and sales KPI reports, opportunity dashboards, win-loss reports, sales forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from CRM and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Dynamics 365 (CRM), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite, Salesforce, Hubspot and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Marketing Campaign Analysis Report Example

What is a Marketing Campaign Analysis Report?

Campaign analysis reports are considered essential marketing analytics tools and are often used by marketing executives and campaign managers to compare lead metrics and cost across their campaigns. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it provides filters so the user can see only the campaigns and time period they are interested in. The resulting campaigns are listed down the rows and across the columns you see lead and cost KPIs like: Total # of leads, Disqualified leads, Open leads, Qualified leads, Budgeted campaign cost, Cost per qualified lead. The last column shows how each campaign compares to the AVERAGE lead cost of all the campaigns. The data typically originates from a CRM system. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Campaign Analysis Reports

Companies and organizations use Campaign Analysis Reports to easily benchmark campaigns against each other to see which ones produces the best result compared to the investment. When used as part of good business practices in a Marketing department, a company can improve its revenues by investing in the best possible campaigns as well as reduce the chances that money and marketing budgets are wasted on poor performing campaigns.

Campaign Analysis Report Example

Here is an example of a modern and automated Campaign Analysis Report that provides essential KPIs and benchmarking.

Marketing Campaign Analysis Report Example

Marketing Campaign Analysis Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Marketing managers, budget users, sales executives.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Campaign Analysis Reports

Progressive Marketing Departments sometimes use several different Campaign Analysis Reports, along with pipeline reports, campaign dashboards, marketing simulation dashboards, marketing budget models, lead and opportunity reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from CRM and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Dynamics 365 (CRM), Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite, Salesforce and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Top Sales Opportunities KPI Report Example

What is a Top Sales Opportunities KPI Report?

Top opportunity reports are considered pipeline analysis tools and are often used by sales managers and account executives to get a snapshot of the top deals that the sales team is working on. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it provides a ranked lists of the top (here: Top 50) active opportunities. The prospects are listed down the rows and the columns show key information like estimated revenue, close date, probability, last updated date, days in pipeline and sales person. In green on the top of the report the opportunities are automatically counted and put into Small, Medium and Large categories. The bottom of the report has totals for the two revenue columns. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Top Opportunities Reports

Companies use Top Opportunities Reports to put attention to their most important deals and also to, at any time, get an estimate of the potential revenue from their best opportunities. When used as part of good business practices in a Sales Department, a company can improve its ability to track and support its top opportunities and thus improve forecasting and increase sales as well as reduce the chances that deals are lost due to lack of pipeline visibility.

Top Opportunities Report Example

Here is an example of a Top 50 Opportunity Report with KPIs.

Top Sales Opportunities KPI Report Example

Top Sales Opportunities KPI Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Sales managers, account executives.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Top Opportunities Reports

Progressive Sales Department Departments sometimes use several different Top Opportunities Reports, along with detailed lead and opportunity reports, win-loss reports, CRM dashboards, sales dashboards, sales reports, sales forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from CRM and enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Dynamics 365 (CRM), Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite, Salesforce and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Website Efficiency Report Example

What is a Website Efficiency Report?

Website efficiency reports are considered web analytics tools and are often used by marketing executives to determine the cost per website vistor that converts into a lead. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it uses data from e.g. Google Analytics and combines it with expense data from the company’s ERP system. On the top of the report, it displays the number of unique website visitors for the past 12 months compared with the 12 months prior to that. In other words, based on the month the user runs the report for, it uses a rolling twelve month functionality to produce these figures. The second row from the top shows the number of people that filled out a form on the web-site. These are referred to as “conversions”. And, the key metric is the third row where it takes the web-site marketing expenses for the same 12 month period and divides it by the number of conversions. In other words, this helps a marketing manager to see how well the investments in search engine optimization (SEO) and other web-site related expenses are providing a return on investment (ROI) as it relates to lead generation for the sales team. The bottom of the report (not seen in the image below) provides other popular web metrics like top referral sites, vistors by country, etc.. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Website Analytics Reports

Companies and organizations use Website Analytics Reports to decide how much money and time to allocate to website-related activities based on the ROI it provides in terms of leads and potential sales. When used as part of good business practices in a Marketing department, a company can improve its sales by showing executives the ROI on web-site investments and thus help budget requests and improve marketing decisions. This also helps reduce the chances that lack of web-site ROI information results in sub-optimized marketing and funding decisions and ultimately reduces sales.

Website Analytics Report Example

Here is an example of Web-site Efficiency Report that highlights top website and marketing expense metrics.

Website Efficiency Report Example

Website Efficiency Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Marketing and Sales Executives.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Website Analytics Reports

Progressive Marketing Departments sometimes use several different Website Analytics Reports, along with campaign analysis reports, annual marketing expense budgets, sales funnel analytics, marketing dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Marketing Campaign Report Example with Cost and ROI Analysis

What is a Marketing Campaign Report with Cost and ROI Analysis?

Marketing campaign cost and return on investment (ROI) reports are considered essential marketing analytics tools and are often used by marketing executives and campaign managers to review the cost and performance of campaigns over a selected date range. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it provides filters where the user can select all- or specific campaigns for a given time period and see key performance metrics. KPIs include cost, expected revenue and ROI per campaign. Traffic lights and charts makes it easy for the user to see top and bottom performing campaigns. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Marketing Campaign ROI Reports

Companies and organizations use Marketing Campaign ROI Reports to easily determine which campaigns to keep investing in and which ones to discontinue. When used as part of good business practices in a Marketing department, a company can improve its ability to attract customers and thus help drive sales for the lowest cost per opportunity as well as reduce the chances that money is wasted on money-losing or low ROI marketing campaigns.

Marketing Campaign ROI Report Example

Here is an example of Marketing Campaign ROI Report to analyze cost and estimated return per campaign.

Marketing Campaign Report Example with Cost and ROI Analysis

Marketing Campaign Report Example with Cost and ROI Analysis

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Marketing managers, budget managers, sales executives.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Marketing Campaign ROI Reports

Progressive Marketing Departments sometimes use several different Marketing Campaign ROI Reports, along with pipeline reports, campaign dashboards, marketing simulation dashboards, marketing budget models, lead and opportunity reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Recurring Revenue Forecast Model for a Technology Company

What is a Recurring Revenue Forecast Model?

Recurring revenue forecast models are considered planning and analysis tools and are often used by sales executives and budgeting managers to estimate key subscription-related drivers for the current- and next year. Some of the key functionality in this type of model is that it can both be used to create forecasts and budgets, and it can be used for what-if modelling without storing the resulting data. The example below is driver-based where the user enters beginning customer count, churn, new customers, new ARR and ARR expansion in the yellow cells on the top. The model then automatically calculates all the rows below both for the current year and next year. The resulting metrics includes net customer count, renewal statistics, ARR, MRR and other statistics. You find an example of this type of input model below.

Purpose of Recurring Revenue Forecast Models

Companies use Recurring Revenue Forecast Models to enable managers to quickly analyze future potential revenues and related subscription metrics. When used as part of good business practices in a sales or FP&A department, a company can improve its revenue-related planning activities, from hiring to cash flow estimates as well as reduce the chances that managers make sub-optimal decisions due to lack of visibility into future subscription metrics.

Recurring Revenue Forecast Model Example

Here is an example of a Recurring Revenue Forecast Model for a Technology Company.

Example of a Recurring Revenue Forecast Model for a Technology Company

Example of a Recurring Revenue Forecast Model for a Technology Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Input model?

The typical users of this type of input model are: CFOs, sales executives, budget managers.

Other Input models Often Used in Conjunction with Recurring Revenue Forecast Models

Progressive sales or FP&A Departments sometimes use several different Recurring Revenue Forecast Models, along with detailed subscription reports, recurring revenue dashboards, budget models, profit & loss and cash flow reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of Product Sales Forecast for a Technology Company

What is a Product Sales Forecast for a Technology Company?

Product sales forecast templates are considered planning tools and are often used by sales managers and revenue officers to estimate revenues for the remainder of the current year. Some of the key functionality in this type of input model is that it dynamically displays actual sales for each month up to the current period and the user can input the forecast for the remaining months. There is also a variance column showing the difference between the bottom up and the top down forecast. Also (not visible in the screenshot example below), when the user enters the percent increase (or decrease) in the top left cell of the form, it calculates a top-down forecast based on last year’s actual sales plus this percent change. Each product and/or service is listed in the rows. You find an example of this type of input model below.

Purpose of Product Sales Forecast Models

Companies use Product Sales Forecast Models to easily capture product and service forecasts during any period of the year. When used as part of good business practices in a Sales department, a company can improve its pipeline visibility and revenue estimates as well as reduce the chances that the company misses profit and margin budgets because of poor revenue insights.

Example of Product Sales Forecast for a Technology Company

Example of Product Sales Forecast for a Technology Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Input model?

The typical users of this type of input model are: Budget Managers, Revenue Officers, Sales Executives.

Other Input models Often Used in Conjunction with Product Sales Forecast Models

Progressive Sales Departments sometimes use several different Product Sales Forecast Models, along with detailed sales reports, sales dashboards, budget models and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Helpdesk Service Goals and Call Volume Forecast Example

What is a Helpdesk Service Goals and Call Volume Forecast?

Hepdesk Service and Call Volume forecasts are considered planning tools and are often used by helpdesk/support managers to review past productivity per helpdesk agent and use it to forecast future call metrics. Some of the key functionality in this type of planning template is that it provides historical call metrics by support person, both for the prior month and the same month last year. Then the total call volume forecast for next month is entered in the yellow column seen in the example below. Using the drivers entered on the top left side, the model then automatically calculates Abandoned calls, Answered Calls, Spam Calls and Real Calls.. You find an example of this type of planning template below.

Purpose of Helpdesk Service Goals and Call Volume Forecast models

Companies use Helpdesk Service Goals and Call Volume Forecast models to create individual productivity forecasts by support team member. When used as part of good business practices in a Helpdesk department, a company can improve its planning accuracy and enable better staffing strategies as well as reduce the chances that poor individual performance goes undected and that this lowers productivity forecasts without proper analysis.

Helpdesk Service Goals and Call Volume Forecast model Example

Here is an example of a web-based Helpdesk Service Goals and Call Volume Forecast input form.

Helpdesk Service Goals and Call Volume Forecast Example

Helpdesk Service Goals and Call Volume Forecast Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Planning template?

The typical users of this type of planning template are: Helpdesk Managers, Budget Managers.

Other Planning templates Often Used in Conjunction with Helpdesk Service Goals and Call Volume Forecast models

Progressive Helpdesk Departments sometimes use several different Helpdesk Service Goals and Call Volume Forecast models, along with helpdesk dashboards, support ticket reports, expense and revenue budgets/forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Helpdesk Call Analysis Report for a Technology Company

What is a Helpdesk Call Analysis Report?

Call analytics reports are considered operational analysis tools and are often used by helpdesk managers and COOs to determine phone support quantity and efficiency. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it compares incoming calls with abandoned calls, real calls and spam calls. In the rows, the report groups company/helpdesk by region which provides useful benchmarking analysis. The pie charts on the top of the report helps with the quantitative and qualititative call comparisons. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Helpdesk Call Analysis Reports

Companies use Helpdesk Call Analysis Reports to make it easy for managers to quickly compare call statistics across helpdesk locations and by call type. When used as part of good business practices in a support department, a company can improve its helpdesk staff planning and use of technology to optimize the support operations as well as reduce the chances that helpdesk managers lose sight of the big picture related to call statistics and therefore make slower- or sub-optimal decisions.

Helpdesk Call Analysis Report Example

Here is an example of a detailed Call Statistics report for a technology company with multiple helpdesk teams.

Example of a Helpdesk Call Analysis Report for a Technology Company

Example of a Helpdesk Call Analysis Report for a Technology Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Helpdesk managers, COOs, support team leads.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Helpdesk Call Analysis Reports

Progressive support department Departments sometimes use several different Helpdesk Call Analysis Reports, along with helpdesk dashboards, support ticket reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of Waterfall Recurring Revenue Report for a Technology Company

What is a Waterfall Recurring Revenue Report?

Waterfall reports for recurring revenues are considered subscription analysis tools and are often used by sales executives and budgeting managers to track current and future recurring revenues. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it displays actual recurring revenues by month and shows how a sales amount has been spread into future months in the current calendar year. In the columns on the right, the running year-to-date amount is automatically calculated and compared to the budget, with a variance column on the far right (not visible in the screenshot below). You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Recurring Revenue Waterfall Reports

Tech companies use Recurring Revenue Waterfall Reports to easily track recognized and upcoming subscription revenue amounts from existing contracts. When used as part of good business practices in a sales or FP&A department, a company can improve its revenue visibility and cash flow planning as well as reduce the chances that sales execs and planners forecast revenues without full understanding of revenues booked into future months.

Recurring Revenue Waterfall Report Example

Here is an example of Recurring Revenue Waterfall Report.

Example of Waterfall Recurring Revenue Report for a Technology Company

Example of Waterfall Recurring Revenue Report for a Technology Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Sales executives, budget managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Recurring Revenue Waterfall Reports

Progressive sales or FP&A Departments sometimes use several different Recurring Revenue Waterfall Reports, along with sales reports, sales dashboards, recurring revenue dashboards, sales and revenue forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples