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Example of a Category and Listener KPI Dashboard for Media Companies

What is a Category and Listener KPI Dashboard?

Category and Listener KPI Dashboards are considered statistical analysis tools and are used by media executives and content managers to analyze monthly trends in user and content metrics. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides monthly trend analysis from six different perspectives: 1) Current year (CY) and prior year (PY) by number of countries reached, 2) Average daily listening (minutes) by desktop and mobile device, 3) Total users versus paid subscribers, 4) Monthly listeners by genre, and 5) Total songs and number of songs added per day. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Category and Listener Dashboards

Media companies use Category and Listener Dashboards to give managers a clear picture of monthly trends and seasonality as it relates to streaming users and available content. When used as part of good business practices in Subscriber Sales and Content departments, a company can improve its marketing and category strategies. It can also reduce the chances that underperforming  subscriptions or categories go under the radar that otherwise would be evident looking at trend charts.

Example of a Category and Listener Dashboard

Here is an example of a Music Category and Listener Metrics Dashboard with six monthly trend charts and comparative data.

Example of a Category and Listener KPI Dashboard for Media Companies

Example of a Category and Listener KPI Dashboard for Media Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Executives, Content Managers, Marketing Managers, Category Managers, Budget Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Category and Listener Dashboards

Progressive Subscriber Sales and Content departments sometimes use several different Category and Listener Dashboards, along with recurring revenue forecasts, recurring revenue dashboards, churn reports, subscription reports, sales forecasts, profit & loss reports, annual budgets, financial dashboards, KPI dashboards, category dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Sales Report for Media Companies

What is a Sales Report for Media Companies?

Media Sales Reports are considered revenue analysis tools and are used by sales executives to analyze revenues across categories and subsidiaries/locations. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it shows sales by category, category group and company for any chosen period. Columns in the report include: The last four quarters with a total, total sales last year, variance amount and variance in percent. Each media category has sub-totals and everything is summarized to a grand total. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Consolidated Media Sales Reports

Media companies use Consolidated Media Sales Reports to get a clear picture of quarterly performance as well as revenue growth compared to prior year. When used as part of good business practices in Sales and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, a company can improve its marketing and sales strategies, and it can reduce the chances that managers make slow or no decisions due to lack of clear sales data.

Example of a Consolidated Media Sales Report

Here is an example of a Media Sales Report with details across categories and subsidiaries.

Example of a Sales Report for Media Companies

Example of a Sales Report for Media Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Executives, VP of Sales, Sales Managers, Budget Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Consolidated Media Sales Reports

Progressive Sales and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Consolidated Media Sales Reports, along with sales dashboards, sales forecasts, profit & loss reports, annual budgets, financial dashboards, KPI dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Profit & Loss Variance Report for Media Companies

What is a Profit & Loss Variance Report for Media Companies?

Profit & Loss Variance Reports are considered monthly analysis tools and are used by executives and financial leaders to review profit margins and variances. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it is combines charts and a typical P&L layout with dynamic rows that automatically includes new general ledger (GL) accounts. The charts highlight KPIs for Revenues, Profit, Profit Margin, and Revenue per Employee. The detailed figures include: Actuals for the month, Actuals for the same month last year, Variance, Variance in percent, Budget for the current month with variances, Actual year-to-date (YTD) current year, and Actual year-to-date (YTD) prior year with variances. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Profit & Loss Variance Reports

Media companies use Profit & Loss Variance Reports to give managers a clear financial picture of the business and in an easily readable format. When used as part of good business practices in Executive and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, a company can improve its decision-making and grow related revenues, and it can reduce the chances that managers miss the “story” behind the numbers.

Example of a Profit & Loss Variance Report

Here is an example of a Profit & Loss Report with charts, traffic light indicators and a modern layout.

Example of a Profit & Loss Variance Report for Media Companies

Example of a Profit & Loss Variance Report for Media Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Board Members, CEOs and other executives, Financial Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Profit & Loss Reports

Progressive Executive and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Profit & Loss Reports, along with balance sheets, cash flow statements, profit & loss budgets, annual budgets, financial dashboards, KPI dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Sales Forecast Model for Media Companies

What is a Sales Forecast Model for Media Companies?

Sales Forecast Models are considered planning tools and are used by sales and budget managers to estimate the revenue from subscriptions, advertising, etc. for the remainder of the year. Some of the main functionality in this type of input template is that it automatically displays the actual data for the historical months and opens the remainder periods of the year for input. The rows list the media categories (print copies, subscriptions, advertising, etc.) by media brand. The bottom of the form shows the grand total actual and forecasted revenues by month. You find an example of this type of input template below.

Purpose of Sales Forecast Input Models

Media companies use Sales Forecast Input Models to speed up and simplify data entry of sales forecasts. When used as part of good business practices in Sales and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, a company can improve its forecasting accuracy and related sales tactics, and it can reduce the chances that overspending that are caused by over-optimistic revenue plans occurs.

Example of a Sales Forecast Input Model

Here is an example of a Sales Forecast Input Template with actual data and data entry for remaining months of the year.

Example of a Sales Forecast Model for Media Companies

Example of a Sales Forecast Model for Media Companies

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Input template?

The typical users of this type of input template are: VP of Sales, Sales Managers, Budget Managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Sales Forecast Input Models

Progressive sales and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Sales Forecast Input Models, along with profit & loss budgets, payroll budgets, capex budgets, variance reports, financial dashboards, budget dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Consolidating Profit & Loss Report for Events and Venues

What is a Consolidating Profit & Loss Report for Events and Venues?

Consolidating Profit & Loss (P&L) reports are considered key performance analysis tools and are used by CFOs and executives to compare and benchmark profitability across events and to see the consolidated results for all events. Some of the main functionality in this type of roll-up report is that it dynamically lists all chosen event categories across the columns with a consolidated total in the far right column. The user can click on any of the tabs at the bottom of the report and see how each individual event consolidate up to the category they belong to on the main report page. Based on the event categories the user selects when running the report, both the summary page and the detailed tabs dynamically adapt. You find an example of this type of roll-up report below.

Purpose of Consolidating Profit & Loss Event Reports

Venues and sports organizations use Consolidating Profit & Loss Event Reports to give managers a clear picture of margins and profitability across all events in one or multiple venues. When used as part of good business practices in Executive and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments, a company can improve its strategic decisions and related profitability, and it can reduce the chances that leaders make slow or inferior decisions due to lack of a complete financial picture.

Example of a Consolidating Profit & Loss Event Report

Here is an example of a Consolidating Profit & Loss Report with a summary tab (seen below) by event category and detailed tabs showing individual events within each category.

Example of a Consolidating Profit & Loss Report for Events and Venues

Example of a Consolidating Profit & Loss Report for Events and Venues

 

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Roll-up report?

The typical users of this type of roll-up report are: financial executives, board members, management teams.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Consolidating Profit & Loss Event Reports

Progressive Executive and Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Consolidating Profit & Loss Event Reports, along with balance sheets, cash flow statements, KPI reports, financial dashboards, annual budgets and forecasts, benchmarking dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Ticket Sales by Vendor Report for Sports Organizations and Venues

What is a Ticket Sales by Vendor Report?

Ticket Sales by Vendor Reports are considered ticket analysis tools and are used by sales executives and ticket managers to monitor vendor performance and top line ticket revenue metrics. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it shows ticket sales by vendor, game and season. The report starts with a summary of total ticket sales by season and then, down the rows, shows details by game and grouped by pre-season , regular season and post season. along with sub-totals, you can see each vendor’s percent of total ticket sales. Ticket vendors are dynamically listed across the columns. The background colors highlights high (green) and low (red) revenues. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Sales by Ticket Vendor Reports

Sports organizations use Sales by Ticket Vendor Reports to easily monitor how each ticket vendor is performing. When used as part of good business practices in FP&A and Ticket departments, a company can improve its vendor strategies and increase revenues, and it can reduce the chances that managers don’t have the data needed to quickly react to unexpected ticket vendor performance.

Example of a Sales by Ticket Vendor Report

Here is an example of a Sales by Ticket Vendor Report with detailed sales figures by game and season.

Example of a Ticket Sales by Vendor Report for Sports Organizations and Venues

Example of a Ticket Sales by Vendor Report for Sports Organizations and Venues

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Executives, ticket managers, sales managers, venue managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Sales by Ticket Vendor Reports

Progressive FP&A and Ticket departments sometimes use several different Sales by Ticket Vendor Reports, along with detailed ticket revenue reports, profit & loss reports, ticket dashboards, KPI reports, annual budgets and forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Ticket Sales Dashboard for Sports Organizations

What is a Ticket Sales Dashboard?

Ticket Sales Dashboards are considered revenue analysis tools and are used by sales executives and ticket managers to have clear insight into all key aspects of ticket sales revenues. Some of the main functionality in this type of report is that it uses six charts to present key metrics and below the charts it displays tables with related figures. The graphical analysis include: 1) Top 5 vendors based on ticket sales, 2) Top 5 ticket types based on sales, 3) Top 5 games based on ticket sales, 4) Ticket revenue ranked by vendor, 5) Revenue by ticket type, and 6) Revenue by game type. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Ticket Sales Dashboards

Sports organizations and venues use Ticket Sales Dashboards to enable managers to optimize their decisions that related to ticket strategies. When used as part of good business practices in FP&A and Ticket departments, an organization can improve its ticket sales strategies and it can reduce the chances that revenues become sub-optimized due to lack of informed management decisions.

Example of a Ticket Sales Dashboard

Here is an example of a Ticket Sales Dashboard with analysis of revenues by vendor, ticket type and game.

Example of a Ticket Sales Dashboard for Sports Organizations

Example of a Ticket Sales Dashboard for Sports Organizations

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Executives, ticket managers, sales managers, venue managers.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Ticket Sales Dashboards

Progressive FP&A and Ticket departments sometimes use several different Ticket Sales Dashboards, along with detailed ticket reports, profit & loss reports, sales dashboards, KPI reports, annual budgets and forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Credit Card Expense Report Example by Category

What is a Credit Card Expenses by Category Report?

Credit card usage reports are considered control and analysis tools and are often used by accountants to manage expenses coming from corporate issued credit cards. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it uses imported credit card transactions to provide a user-friendly format to review monthly expenditures. The report groups individual transactions by employee, category and assigned GL account. Amounts are sub-totaled for the same groupings. The line item detail also include vendor, transaction description and date. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of Credit Card Summary by Category Reports

Companies and organizations use Credit Card Summary by Category Reports to easily review monthly card usage by expense category. When used as part of good business practices in a accounting department, a company can improve its cost control and better analyze what type of expenses credit cards are being used for as well as reduce the chances that corporate usage policies are not being followed or that cards are being used in areas where other payment methods are preferred.

Credit Card Summary by Category Report Example

Here is an example of a Credit Card Report with expenses grouped by category.

Credit Card Expense Report Example by Category

Credit Card Expense Report Example by Category

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Accountants, Auditors.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with Credit Card Summary by Category Reports

Progressive Accounting Departments sometimes use several different Credit Card Summary by Category Reports, along with Travel & Entertainment (T&E) reports, T&E dashboards, expense reports, anomaly reports, exception reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from credit card vendors or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Departmental Travel and Entertainment Analysis Report Example

What is a Travel and Entertainment Departmental Analysis Report?

Travel and entertainment (T&E) reports are considered expense analysis tools and are often used by controllers and accountants to manage and review departmental T&E costs. Some of the key functionality in this type of report is that it is parameter driven and is usually reviewed on a monthly basis. The columns shows Travel (expense) Type, Department and Amount. The rows show expense by category and department. When the user clicks on a category such as “Dinner”, the row expands and all departments are shown with their individual expense amounts. The bottom of the report displays a chart that ranks total actual expenses by category. You find an example of this type of report below.

Purpose of T&E Departmental Expense Analysis Reports

Companies and organizations use T&E Departmental Expense Analysis Reports to easily review T&E expenses both at a high level and with the option to drill down to detail by individual department. When used as part of good business practices in an accounting department, a company can improve its cost control and related policies as well as reduce the chances that there is overspending or abuse in certain areas.

T&E Departmental Expense Analysis Report Example

Here is an example of Travel & Entertainment Report by Category and Department.

 Departmental Travel and Entertainment Analysis Report Example

Departmental Travel and Entertainment Analysis Report Example

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Report?

The typical users of this type of report are: Controllers and Accountants.

Other Reports Often Used in Conjunction with T&E Departmental Expense Analysis Reports

Progressive Accounting Departments sometimes use several different T&E Departmental Expense Analysis Reports, along with T&E dashboards, departmental and corporate profit & loss reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples