Example of a Transportation Carrier Monthly Trend Dashboard

What is a Transportation Carrier Monthly Trend Dashboard?

Carrier trend dashboards are considered valuable monthly analysis tools and are used by analysts and logistics managers to look for important trends in transportation KPIs. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides graphical trend analysis for six key carrier metrics. These include monthly seasonality and exceptions in: 1) Truck turnaround time (hours), 2) Average revenue per hour, 3) Truckload capacity utilized, 4) Transit time (hours), 5) Average revenue per mile, and 6) On time pickup. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Monthly Trend Dashboards for Transportation Carriers

Distribution businesses use Trend Dashboards to analyze monthly seasonality and outliers. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its decision speed when important trends are discovered, and it can reduce the chances that managers don’t quickly notice problems and outliers amongst their carriers.

Monthly Trend Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Monthly Trend Dashboard for Transportation Carriers to compare logistical KPIs.

Example of a Transportation Carrier Monthly Trend Dashboard

Example of a Transportation Carrier Monthly Trend Dashboard

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Analysts, Logistics managers, transportation executives, COOs.

Other Dashboards Often Used in Conjunction with Monthly Trend Dashboards for Transportation Carriers

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Monthly Trend Dashboards for Transportation Carriers, along with  inventory reports, demand forecasts, supplier reports, transportation rate forecasts, annual budgets and forecasts and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Transportation Carrier Comparison Dashboard

What is a Transportation Carrier Comparison Dashboard?

Carrier comparison dashboards are considered valuable benchmarking tools and are used by logistics managers to compare performance and cost across their carriers. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides graphical analysis for six key transportation metrics. These include: 1) Truck turnaround time (hours), 2) Average revenue per hour, 3) Truckload capacity utilized, 4) Transit time (hours), 5) Average revenue per mile, and 6) On time pickup. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Carrier Comparison Dashboards

Distribution businesses use Carrier Comparison Dashboards to benchmark their carriers. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its logistics strategies and decision-speed, and it can reduce the chances that managers don’t quickly notice problems and outliers amongst their carriers.

Carrier Comparison Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Transportation Carrier Comparison Dashboard to compare logistical KPIs.

Example of a Transportation Carrier Comparison Dashboard

Example of a Transportation Carrier Comparison Dashboard

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Logistics managers, transportation executives, COOs.

Other Dashboards Often Used in Conjunction with Carrier Comparison Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) departments sometimes use several different Carrier Comparison Dashboards, along with  inventory reports, demand forecasts, supplier reports, transportation rate forecasts, cost budgets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Supplier KPI Dashboard for a Distribution Business

What is a Supplier KPI Dashboard?

Supplier KPI dashboards are considered important analysis tools and are used by analysts and purchasing managers to monitor the performance of their suppliers. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it is parameter-driven and helps the user analyze the company’s suppliers from six perspectives: 1) Cost per drop, 2) Back order rate versus perfect order rate, 3) Length of transit (hours) versus production time, 4) Purchase trend, 5) Top 10 items, and 6) Top 10 suppliers. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Supplier KPI Dashboards

Distribution businesses use Supplier KPI Dashboards for monthly performance tracking of their suppliers. When used as part of good business practices in Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and Purchasing departments, a company can improve its supply chain, product quality and efficiency. It can also reduce the chances that major disruptions or cost issues occur due to avoidable supplier problems.

Supplier KPI Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Supplier KPI Dashboard for a distribution business, with monthly trends and top ten item and supplier rankings.

Example of a Supplier KPI Dashboard for a Distribution Business

Example of a Supplier KPI Dashboard for a Distribution Business

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: COOs, purchasing/procurement managers, analysts.

Other Dashboards Often Used in Conjunction with Supplier KPI Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A), Purchasing and operational departments sometimes use several different Supplier KPI Dashboards, along with  inventory reports, inventory dashboards, demand and supply forecasts, sales budgets, margin reports, quality reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Monthly Trend Dashboard for a Distribution Center

What is a Monthly Trend Dashboard?

Distribution center trend dashboards are considered analysis tools and are used by executives and analysts to analyze trends in strategic KPIs. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides graphical analysis from six different perspectives: 1) Inventory turnover versus backorder rate by location, 2) Order cycle time, 3) Quantity on hand, 4) Order picking accuracy versus Rate of return, 5) Inventory carrying cost, and 6) Inventory value. The dashboard is parameter-based and the user can run it for any period. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Monthly Trend Dashboards for Distribution Centers

Distribution businesses use Monthly Trend Dashboards to easily detect any periodic anomalies. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its performance and related strategies, and it can reduce the chances that managers do not react quickly with inventory adjustments and other corrective tactics.

Monthly Trend Dashboards for Distribution Center Example

Here is an example of a Monthly Trend Dashboard for a distribution center with inventory-related analytical KPIs.

Example of a Monthly Trend Dashboard for a Distribution Center

Example of a Monthly Trend Dashboard for a Distribution Center

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Inventory managers, distribution center managers, executives.

Other Dashboards Often Used in Conjunction with Monthly Trend Dashboards for Distribution Centers

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and operational departments sometimes use several different Monthly Trend Dashboards for Distribution Centers, along with  inventory and sales reports, margin reports, sales dashboards, sales forecasts, supplier reports, costing and allocation reports, profit & loss trend reports, balance sheets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Distribution Center Comparison Dashboard

What is a Distribution Center Comparison Dashboard?

Comparative distribution center dashboards are considered benchmarking tools and are used by executives, analysts and managers to analyze KPIs across the company’s locations. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides graphical analysis from six different perspectives: 1) Inventory turnover versus backorder rate by location, 2) Order cycle time, 3) Quantity on hand, 4) Order picking accuracy versus Rate of return, 5) Inventory carrying cost, 6) Inventory value. The dashboard is parameter-based and the user can run it for any period. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Distribution Center Comparison Dashboards

Distribution businesses use Comparison Dashboards to benchmark performance for various KPIs across their locations. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its individual distribution center strategies and inventory processes, and it can reduce the chances that managers miss outliers amongst their locations.

Distribution Center Comparison Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Distribution Center Comparison Dashboard with inventory-related KPIs.

Example of a Distribution Center Comparison Dashboard

Example of a Distribution Center Comparison Dashboard

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: COOs, inventory managers, distribution center managers, executives.

Other Dashboards Often Used in Conjunction with Distribution Center Comparison Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and operational departments sometimes use several different Distribution Center Comparison Dashboards, along with  inventory and sales reports, margin reports, sales dashboards, sales forecasts, supplier reports, costing and allocation reports, profit & loss reports, balance sheets and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Item Comparison Dashboard for a Distributor

What is an Item Comparison Dashboard for a Distributor?

Item dashboards are considered product analysis tools and are used by analysts and managers to analyze KPIs for the items they carry. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides graphical analysis from eight different perspectives: 1) Inventory turnover rate by item, 2) Back order rate, 3) Order cycle time, 4) Quantity on hand, 5) order picking accuracy, 6) Rate of return, 7) Inventory carrying cost, 8) Inventory value. The dashboard is parameter-based and the user can run it for any period. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Item Comparison Dashboards

Distribution businesses use Item Comparison Dashboards to benchmark performance for various KPIs across their products. When used as part of good business practices in a Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) department, a company can improve its product strategies and inventory processes, and it can reduce the chances that managers miss outliers in their product portfolio.

Item Comparison Dashboard Example

Here is an example of an Item Comparison Dashboard with inventory-related KPIs.

Example of a Item Comparison Dashboard for a Distributor

Example of a Item Comparison Dashboard for a Distributor

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: COOs, inventory managers, distribution executives, product managers.

Other Dashboards Often Used in Conjunction with Item Comparison Dashboards

Progressive Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and operational departments sometimes use several different Item Comparison Dashboards, along with  inventory and sales reports, margin reports, sales dashboards, sales forecasts, supplier reports, costing and allocation reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Customer Rating Dashboard for a Distribution Company

What is a Customer Rating Dashboard for a Distribution Company?

Customer rating reports are considered rare and powerful analysis tools and are used by executives and sales managers to analyze sales performance metrics. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard report is that it gives a unique set of customer metrics that few companies currently have. The six charts provides analysis of: 1) Top 10 customer by rating, 2) Monthly average customer purchase amount, 3) Average monthly gross margin per customer deal, 4) Bottom 10 customers by rating, 5) Monthly trend of average days outstanding, and 6) Average customer order size trend. The “rating” is based on a formula that scores each customer base don multiple criteria such as payment time, AR aging and purchase amounts. You find an example of this type of dashboard report below.

Purpose of Customer Rating Dashboards

Distribution businesses use Customer Rating Dashboards to give managers an objective view of the quality of the customer base and how this is trending. When used as part of good business practices in an sales department, a company can improve its sales, target market, accounting and product strategies, and it can reduce the chances that important policy and tactical decisions are delayed.

Customer Rating Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Customer Rating Dashboard with trends and scoring of customers.

Example of a Customer Rating Dashboard for a Distribution Company

Example of a Customer Rating Dashboard for a Distribution Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard report?

The typical users of this type of dashboard report are: Chief Revenue Officers and sales managers.

Other Dashboard reports Often Used in Conjunction with Customer Rating Dashboards

Progressive sales departments sometimes use several different Customer Rating Dashboards, along with  customer 360 reports, AR and sales reports, sales dashboards, marketing reports and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

Example of a Customer Sales Dashboard for a Distribution Company

What is a Customer Sales Dashboard for a Distribution Company?

Customer sales dashboards are considered market analysis tools and are used by sales executives to analyze sales performance metrics. Some of the main functionality in this type of dashboard is that it provides six visualizations for KPI analysis: 1) Sales by sales manager, 2) Gross margin by product, 3) Actual versus budgeted product sales, 4) Monthly revenue trend, 5) Accounts receivable (AR) by customer, and 6) Top 5 customer sales. You find an example of this type of dashboard below.

Purpose of Customer Sales Dashboards

Distribution businesses use Customer Sales Dashboards to provide self-service analysis that enables easy monitoring of customer sales metrics. When used as part of good business practices in an sales department, a company can improve its marketing and positioning strategies, and it can reduce the chances that sales managers miss the big picture because they only view transaction reports.

Customer Sales Dashboard Example

Here is an example of a Customer Sales Dashboard for a distribution company.

Example of a Customer Sales Dashboard for a Distribution Company

Example of a Customer Sales Dashboard for a Distribution Company

You can find hundreds of additional examples here

Who Uses This Type of Dashboard?

The typical users of this type of dashboard are: Chief Revenue Officers and sales managers.

Other Dashboards Often Used in Conjunction with Customer Sales Dashboards

Progressive sales departments sometimes use several different Customer Sales Dashboards, along with  product sales dashboards, sales transaction reports, accounts receivables (AR) reports, profit & loss reports, inventory dashboards and other management and control tools.

Where Does the Data for Analysis Originate From?

The Actual (historical transactions) data typically comes from management systems or enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like: Microsoft Dynamics 365 (D365) Finance, Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (D365 BC), Microsoft Dynamics AX, Microsoft Dynamics NAV, Microsoft Dynamics GP, Microsoft Dynamics SL, Sage Intacct, Sage 100, Sage 300, Sage 500, Sage X3, SAP Business One, SAP ByDesign, Acumatica, Netsuite and others.

In analyses where budgets or forecasts are used, the planning data most often originates from in-house Excel spreadsheet models or from professional corporate performance management (CPM/EPM) solutions.

What Tools are Typically used for Reporting, Planning and Dashboards?

Examples of business software used with the data and ERPs mentioned above are:

  • Native ERP report writers and query tools
  • Spreadsheets (for example Microsoft Excel)
  • Corporate Performance Management (CPM) tools (for example Solver)
  • Dashboards (for example Microsoft Power BI and Tableau)

Corporate Performance Management (CPM) Cloud Solutions and More Examples

solver microsoft

In a recent announcement, Microsoft and Solver launched a “Cooperation Agreement” (Agreement) to deliver deeply integrated planning and reporting for Microsoft’s Dynamics 365 Finance. This Agreement offers several benefits for current and future Dynamics 365 Finance (Finance) customers; and as a byproduct, many of these same benefits will also be available for Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central (Business Central) customers. Key benefits for Finance customers, Business Central customers, and both (D365) are discussed below.

Advanced CPM Software

One Version of the Truth

With a two-way integration between D365 and Solver, customers will be able to easily synchronize data between D365 and Solver, and update completed budgets and forecasts from Solver back into D365. Furthermore, customers will be able to drill down on reports in Solver to source transactions in D365.

Vendor Stability

In recent years there have been many acquisitions in the corporate performance management (CPM) and analytics space, often making customers uncertain about the future direction of their vendor. One of the most well-known of these acquisitions was when ERP vendor Workday acquired Adaptive Insights (Adaptive) in 2018. While it was an exciting transaction for Workday customers, it was not good news for Adaptive customers and Partners on ERPs competing with Workday. With Solver’s independent status, focus on the Azure cloud platform, and now this new Agreement with Microsoft, customers can look forward to years of integration enhancements and platform benefits.

More Leverage of the Microsoft Azure Platform and Other Microsoft Products like Teams and Excel

Since its inception, the Solver cloud product has had a deep integration to Excel for its report and budget form design experience. Microsoft Teams users can view Solver reports in Teams while discussing budgets and financials with other users, all on the Microsoft Azure platform. As part of the recently announced Microsoft Agreement, Solver will also deliver several enhanced integrations and other capabilities to D365 customers.

Easier Cloud Migrations to D365 for Legacy Dynamics AX, NAV, GP and SL Customers

There is still a large, global customer base running the on-premise Microsoft Dynamics legacy ERPs.

Solver’s integrations to Dynamics AX, NAV, GP and SL will assist Dynamics legacy customers’ migration to D365 at a reduced cost and amount of effort. In a nutshell, legacy customers can “park” their important historical AX, NAV, GP and SL data (e.g. 10 years’ worth) in Solver’s cloud data warehouse, and minimize the data they need to convert and load into their new D365 cloud ERP, thus saving time and cost.

Quick-Time-to-Value and Low Implementation Risk

The enhanced, two-way integration resulting from the Solver – Microsoft Agreement provided an opportunity to create QuickStart, an integration wizard that includes Solver’s unique mapping technology which enables immediate use of pre-built financial reports, budget forms and Power BI dashboards. While reporting and planning tools typically take weeks or months for customers to integrate, deploy and design, Solver’s QuickStart technology enables cloud tenant deployment with a standard D365 integration and pre-built financial templates to be up and running in as little as one day. This quick-time-to-value frees up more time for partners and customers to create high value analytics content. It also lowers the risk of implementations going over budget and not delivering promised value.

Eliminate or Reduce Dependency on Manual Excel Models or Legacy CPM Platforms

D365 customers will be able to save costs and reduce effort by eliminating old, manual planning and reporting models and consolidating them into the Solver cloud platform.  Most businesses extensively use homegrown Excel models to meet specific formatting requirements, and to customize budgeting and forecasting models. Some also have legacy third-party CPM solutions with ongoing high maintenance costs.

These companies will now be able to deploy Solver with deep two-way integrations into their D365 system, saving time and effort, with fewer models and technologies to update and maintain.

More Time for Analysis and Daily Accounting Tasks

The rapid time-to-value and simpler upkeep resulting from the technologies evolving out of the Microsoft – Solver Agreement will give the office of finance more time for analysis and high value tasks.  Direct time savings and improved efficiency are key customer benefits of interoperability between D365 and Solver. Furthermore, users will see continuous expansion and improvements in out-of-the-box integrations, including third-party apps that work with D365, as well as a growing marketplace with out-of-the-box reporting and planning templates.

The Promise of a “Cleaner” ERP?

One of the premises of the entire CPM software category is to provide a connected, best-of-breed planning and reporting solution. When customers plan their CPM solution before deploying their new ERP system, it has a great potential to eliminate unnecessary, complex or “clunky” ERP configurations patched up with accompanying complex manual Excel models.

The Agreement between Microsoft and Solver also promises a reduction of compromises done with dimensions and other setups during an ERP implementation. Adjustments that are typically done to purely to satisfy native ERP reporting or planning requirements. The new agreement provides the potential for cleaner, more user-friendly ERP deployments.

Advanced CPM Software

Higher ROI on Microsoft Dynamics 365 Finance & Business Central Investment  

Most companies at this point have a plan to migrate to a cloud ERP, if they haven’t already done so.  Those that have previously experienced ERP implementations know the risks of running over time and over budget. Because of the many benefits brought by closely aligned ERP and CPM solutions, and how the Microsoft – Solver Agreement further enables this, customers are likely to enjoy a higher return on investment (ROI) for their new D365 solution.

Summary

While all modern cloud ERPs have application programming interfaces (APIs) and independent software vendor (ISV) apps that can connect to provide additional value to customers, deeper relationships like the one between Microsoft and Solver is rarer and offers many new benefits to customers as they continue to digitalize and automate their processes as they move their business apps to the cloud.

Integration promises initial deployments of Solver’s cloud planning and reporting for Dynamics 365 in as little as one day to drive quick-time-to-value for Microsoft customers

 

LOS ANGELES, Calif. — January 26, 2021 — Solver, Inc. today announced a strategic cooperation agreement with Microsoft to deliver advanced cloud-based planning and reporting from Microsoft Azure to Dynamics 365 customers world-wide. One of the unique benefits of the agreement is QuickStart, a rapid deployment technology that Solver has designed as an add-on for Microsoft’s Dynamics 365 Finance. This enables Dynamics 365 customers to get up and running with pre-built, fully functioning forecasts, budgets and reports in as little as one day. In a time of economic uncertainties, this quick-time-to-value will also help Microsoft partners deliver Solver’s advanced planning to their customers in record time.

Solver’s solution will enable customers to simplify day-to-day planning and reporting tasks, foster collaboration, increase productivity and enhance security.

Customers will also benefit from the Solver multi-tenant cloud solution’s utilization of Microsoft technologies, which includes: Availability on global Azure data centers; Use of Azure Active Directory for single sign on; Integration to Microsoft Teams for collaboration; Cloud-connected Excel add-in for flexible report and input form design; and out-of-the box Power BI connector for professional dashboards.

Driving better and faster decisions in times of change

As organizations adjust and adapt to changing business environments, the need for connected, real-time planning capabilities is accelerating. Making faster, informed decisions across all areas of the business requires a continuous planning process. Solver offers customers a modern Azure-cloud based platform that now, with the new QuickStart integration to Microsoft Dynamics 365 Finance, will make it much easier and faster to connect strategic goals and KPIs with annual budgets and forecasts, as well as, with historical data from Dynamics 365. Ultimately, the deep two-way integration with Microsoft Dynamics 365 delivers consistent dataflows that provide customers with one version of the truth.

Furthermore, companies are increasingly spreading their data across various cloud business applications, such as ERP, HRM, and sales automation.  Solver and its ability to combine these data sources into Solver’s business data warehouse enables deep planning capabilities.  In addition, it also drives scalable modern analytics and reporting for the Microsoft Dynamics 365 community.

Deep integrations enable quick-time-to-value for Microsoft and Solver customers

Today’s announcement also includes the following additional integrations and support, focusing on easier access, collaboration and security between Microsoft and Solver applications.

  • The Solver QuickStart wizard makes it very easy for customers to deploy the initial integration and data loading between Dynamics 365 and Solver applications.
  • Solver QuickStart templates saves weeks of report and input form design work by delivering out-of-the-box industry standard financial reports and planning forms that can be used immediately without customization.
  • Ability to directly drill-down from Solver planning input forms and reports into related Dynamics 365 screens for immediate visibility and rapid decisions related to underlying historical data.
  • Solver’s automated direct write-back of approved budgets and forecasts to Dynamics 365 speeds up and simplifies accountants’ work at the end of the planning process. It will also enable immediate visibility of Solver budget and forecast data in Dynamics 365 for additional budget control and reporting.
  • Microsoft Teams integration enables users across the organization to access Solver from within Teams to view budgets, forecasts and reports.
  • Microsoft Azure Active Directory integration provides customers access to enterprise data and applications easily and securely through single sign-on. With expanded integrations, joint customers that use Microsoft and Solver applications can confidently secure end-to-end identity lifecycle and entitlement settings for greater privacy and security management. This feature was launched in January, 2020.

Comments on the news

“Continuous planning that is effortlessly connected with backend financial systems is quickly becoming a requirement as organizations adapt their strategies to our rapidly changing world,” said Nils Rasmussen, CEO at Solver.

“With our Solver cloud planning and reporting platform and the new two-way QuickStart integration to Microsoft Dynamics 365 Finance, our goal is to change the game of planning by making it very easy for finance teams to manage annual budgeting and reiterative forecasting processes across an organization’s silos of information,” explains Tad Remington, Chief Commercial Officer at Solver.

Georg Glantschnig, General Manager, Microsoft Dynamics 365 said, “At Microsoft, we’re laser-focused on empowering the Office of Finance and their counterparts across the organization to drive productivity and business performance with innovative and secure cloud-based financial applications.  Solver delivers deep corporate performance management directly integrated into Dynamics 365 Finance.”

Availability

Solver is a Premier Tier Dynamics 365 Finance solution, available today on Microsoft AppSource (Dynamics 365 Finance and Dynamics 365 Business Central). The new Solver QuickStart integrations for Dynamics 365 Finance and Business Central are scheduled for release in the coming months.

About Solver

Solver is a leading provider (Dresner and G2) of cloud applications for the office of finance that help drive faster and better decisions. Founded in 1996, Solver delivers a unified planning, financial reporting & consolidations and analytics platform for Microsoft Dynamics 365 Finance,  Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central, as well as, the legacy Dynamics ERP solutions and ERPs from other leading vendors (Solver Suite & Dynamics 365 Finance Tours).

 

For more information

Press:  Marketing – Solver, (310) 691-5300, Marketing@SolverGlobal.com

Become a Solver Partner:  Terry Ginley, VP Partnership Development, TGinley@SolverGlobal.com

Sales:  Sales@SolverGlobal.com